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15-21 November 1942: Five Ships Bring Food and Fuel for Malta

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15 November 1942: 700 Allied PoWs Die in British Sub Attack

SS Scillin

At 2 o’clock this afternoon 27 recovered British prisoners of war and some 46 Italian prisoners were landed in Malta from HM Submarine Sahib (P 212). They are the only survivors from the torpedoed Italian merchant ship SS Scillin.

Scillin was carrying 814 Allied prisoners of war and over 200 Italian troops when she embarked from Tripoli on Friday.  Sahib was on patrol in the area, intercepting supply convoys and troop transports in support of the Axis campaign in North Africa.  Just before nine o’clock  yesterday evening  a  Malta-based reconnaissance aircraft alerted her to the presence of a merchant ship.  The submarine’s monitors soon detected the vessel off the Tunisian coast and its commander Lt John Bromage, with no knowledge of the ship’s passengers, ordered the attack.

HMS Sahib (P 212)

HMS Sahib struck the merchant ship with a single torpedo.  The missile hit the Scillin’s engine room and the ship sank in less than a minute.  It was only when the submarine’s crew heard survivors in the water speaking English that the full implications of the sinking were realised.  They responded quickly and within 35 minutes had rescued 27 Allied prisoners of war (26 British and one South African), plus 46 members of the Scillin’s Italian crew including the captain. 

An Italian warship then approached and Sahib was forced to withdraw, abandoning the rescue and leaving another ten men in the water.  According to survivors, the British prisoners were in very poor condition due to lack of food and medical treatment.  Sahib’s torpedo blew out the bottom of the hold in which the British PoWs had been penned, and they died instantly.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 15 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 16 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  100% cloud; rain.

0740-0855 hrs  1435 Squadron Luqa carry out a reconnaissance patrol between Linosa and Lampedusa: no enemy aircraft are sighted.

0820-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0821-0835 hrs   Air raid alert: aircraft turned out to be friendly.

0935-1055 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol to Lampedusa and Linosa: no enemy aircraft or anti-aircraft fire encountered.

1450-1530 hrs  Two Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far search for missing delivery Beaufighters.  Weather conditions are very bad and they find nothing.

1510-1540 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron search for the delivery Beaufighters.  Visibility is nil, with cloud down to 500 feet, and nothing is found.  One Spitfire does not return: Sgt Roberts is missing.

1620-1640 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa is sent to search for missing delivery Beaufighters has to return due to the adverse weather.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Henry Atkinson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 500 Squadron; Pilot Officer James Diack, RAF VR, 81 Squadron; Flying Officer Francis Jemmett, Royal Canadian Air Force, 69 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Cyril Prior, RAF VR, 500 Squadron; Sergeant John Roberts, RAF VR, 249 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 15 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hebe swept P 212 in. P 42 sailed for patrol, swept out by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Five sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering the harbours and aerodromes of Sicily.  Departures  Two Liberators, four Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Beaufighter to Abusuier.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires on reconnaissance failed to return: pilots missing.  One Spitfire shot down in the sea: pilot missing.  Three Beaufighters missing in transit between EDCU and Malta.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  A Company took over Tal Virtu observation post and coast patrol.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  11th-15th November the Battalion has found one Officer and 50 Other Ranks as crater-filling party on Hal Far aerodrome.  Working party also at Zabbar sub-depot: four 15 cwt and four impressed lorries; 16 Other Ranks manning trucks for convoy transport work.

 

16 November 1942: Convoy Embarks For Malta

Message from AOC Malta to Admiral Cunningham:  “We are delighted to be able to assist your expedition from the west as well as the expedition from the east.”

The first convoy to Malta since Operation Pedestal (Santa Marija) in August sailed this morning.  The embarkation of a convoy from the eastern Mediterranean has been made possible by the Allied Army advance following the Battle of El Alamein.

Merchant ship Denbighshire

After a delay of 24 hours pending Allied occupation of the Gambut airfields, convoy MW 13 – codenamed Operation Stoneage – sailed from Suez and passed through the Canal to arrive at Port Said by dusk, proceeding straight to sea. The convoy is made up of four merchant ships, the 9000 ton Dutch ship Bantam, the British 8000 ton Denbighshire and two American ships: the 8000 ton Mormacmoon and 7000 ton Robin Locksley.  The cruiser Euryalus and sevendestroyers are escorting them to the approaches to Alexandria.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 16 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 17 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Much heavy rain, especially early, and low cloud; visibility nil.

Night  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa patrols north of the Island at 10000 feet: no enemy aircraft seen.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 16 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 46 and P 212 were swept out by Rye.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  Heavy rain rendered the aerodrome unserviceable.

LUQA  No operations due to bad weather.

TA QALI  Aerodrome unserviceable: no operations.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  300 men standing by to unload HMS Welshman.  Stood down about 1000 hrs: ship due to arrive tomorrow.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1300 hrs  Party of 300 Officers and men standing by for convoy duties.  1330 hrs  Party stood down.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn found one Officer and 25 men as crater-filling party on Hal Far aerodrome.  Working party also at Zabbar sub-depot: four 15 cwt and four impressed lorries; 16 Other Ranks manning trucks for convoy transport work.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Heavy rainfall all day stopped air activity.

24 FORTRESS COMPANY ROYAL ENGINEERS  The following attachments from Malta Section took place leaving all British personnel at Bahar-ic-cahaq with the exception of 1 NCO and 10 sappers (Maltese). 10 Other Ranks attached to BD section.  16 Other Ranks attached to 173 Tunnelling Coy RE, 5 Other Ranks transferred.

 

17 November 1942:  Army on Standby to Unload Convoy

Message to AOC Western Desert:  “All ranks RAF Malta send heartiest congratulations to RAF Western desert and 8th Army on their brilliant victory over Axis forces.  We are most grateful for your opening of our supply line from the east.”

OPERATION STONEAGE SHIPS REACH ALEXANDRIA

HMS Euryalus

Convoy MW 13 and close escort arrived off Alexandria early today, where the accompanying Fleet destroyers were relieved by Hunt class ships of the 5th Flotilla.  Led by the cruiser Euryalus, HMS Aldenham, Beaufort, Belvoir, Croome, Dulverton, Exmoor, Hurworth, Hursley, Tetcott and the Greek Pindos departed for Malta with the four merchant ships at 15 knots at 0700 hours.

The Rear Admiral Commanding, Fifteenth Cruiser Squadron in Cleopatra, with Dido, Arethusa, Orion and the Twelfth and Fourteen Destroyer Flotillas, were sailed at 1330 hours, with the aim of reaching the convoy at daylight tomorrow.

SUBMARINE ‘CLUB RUNS’ TO END

In view of the improved situation in the Mediterranean, submarines of the 1st Flotilla are to discontinue carrying petrol and stores to Malta.

MALTA MONEY PROBLEMS

Currency in Malta is about to be ‘defaced’ to cover an acute shortage of one shilling coins on the Island.  It has been decided that one shilling notes are urgently needed but supply of the currency from England is currently impossible.  In an emergency measure, it has been decided to overprint old stocks of unused two shilling notes on both sides as ‘1 shilling’.  These were originally printed in London and held in stock in Malta but never used.

The newly amended notes have been issued today and immediately become legal tender.  They will remain in circulation until new one shilling notes can be printed in London and shipped to Malta. (1)

MALTA JOINT OPS SHOW FORCE

Malta air forces launched a joint operation this evening against an enemy tanker heading for North Africa.  The 10,000 ton tanker escorted by two destroyers was located 46 miles from Homs.  One special Wellington 69 Squadron was despatched with two Albacores of the Fleet Air Arm to attack.  They located the convoy at 2155 hours and the Weelington dropped three flares.  The Albacores then attacked from port and starboard with two torpedoes, each of which scored a hit amidships, causing terrific explosions. The tanker was set ablaze from stem to stern, the fire visible 80 miles away.  The vessel then keeled over and sank.  All the Malta aircraft returned safely to base.

TRIPOLI TARGET

Reconnaissance photographs taken today show that Tripoli has resumed its former importance as Rommel’s main port of entry for supplies to Libya, following the loss of Benghazi to the Allies.  All available quays and jetties at Tripoli are occupied by merchant vessels or F boats unloading supplies.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 17 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 18 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Thunderstorms in the morning, becoming showery to fair.

0650-0810 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali carry out a patrol from Linosa to Lampedusa: no sightings.

0700-0740 hrs  Two Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa fly 13 miles north of St Paul’s Bay on a search but have to return early due to adverse weather conditions.

1915-2035 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa patrols over Comiso aerodrome, Sicily.  Pilot F/O Kinmouth shoots down one JU 88 which crashes in flames and damages another.

2308-2327 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft prove to be friendly.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Eric Clegg, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 18 Squadron; Sergeant Harold Goggin, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 253 Squadron; Flying Officer Charles Kaye, RAF VR, 18 Squadron; Sergeant Jack Walder, RAF VR, 18 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 17 NOVEMBER 1942

Ancient transporting troops in Malta, March 1942 (c) IWM A7331

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Utmost to sea.  The tug Ancient which was damaged and sunk during the heavy air attacks in April 1942 was salvaged and taken in hand for refit.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Baltimore from LG 227; nine Beaufighters from Gambut; one Liberator, one Hudson from Gibraltar.

LUQA  69 Squadron Photo-reconnaissance: seven sorties covering harbours and aerodromes in Italy and Sicily.  2050-2150 hrs  Seven Wellingtons (two 40 Squadron, five 104 Squadron) were despatched to attack El Aouina aerodrome: a fire was started near one hangar.  0330-0425 hrs   Five Wellingtons attacked El Aouina: results not observed due to weather.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn found one Officer and 25 men as crater-filling party on Hal Far aerodrome: working party cancelled at the end of the day.  Working party at Zabbar sub-depot: four 15 cwt and four impressed lorries; 16 Other Ranks manning trucks for convoy transport work.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Dumps and sub-depot on four days’ readiness.

 

18 November 1942: Convoy Attacked – 159 Killed

The Operation Stoneage convoy was attacked today by German torpedo-bombers.  HMS Arethusa was hit with the loss of 159 men. (CASUALTY LIST) 

HMS Cleopatra

The first enemy attack came mid-morning, some four hours after the full convoy had assembled.  Cruisers HMS Cleopatra, Orion, Arethusa and Dido with seven Fleet destroyers joined convoy MW 13 and close escort at dawn.  Single engined fighters from Matruba and Beaufighters from Gambut were dispatched to provide fighter protection throughout the day.

At 1110 hours the convoy was attacked by six JU 88s: one aircraft was seen to crash and no damage was caused.  Five hours later 26 JU 52s escorted by two fighters were seen passing ahead of the convoy heading northeast. Four of the Allied aircraft attacked the raiders and each claimed to have damaged one.  

Once the attack had subsided the Fifteenth Cruiser Squadron and Fleet Destroyers parted company in order to cover the convoy north towards Malta.

Damage to Arethusa

Minutes later an explosion was heard and convoy command received a signal: Arethusa had been hit.  Taking advantage of the failing light, torpedo bombers had launched another attack and the cruiser had been struck amidships by an aircraft torpedo, killing 159 members of the crew.  The ship was badly damaged and turned back for Alexandria, escorted by Petard.

Two more torpedo bombers attacked the convoy during the evening.  The second is believed probably destroyed by anti-aircraft fire from the American merchantman Robin Locksley.

WELSHMAN DOCKS WITH SUPPLIES – UNLOADED IN RECORD TIME

The fast minelayer HMS Welshman arrived in Grand Harbour from Algiers at 0920 hours this morning, having been delayed in the eastern Mediterranean by the recent bad weather.  Under the codename Operation Analyst, Welshman has brought 110 tons of powdered milk, 25 tons of dried beans, 25 tons of dried peas, 110 tons of corned beef and fifteen 18″ aerial torpedoes, as well as 13 officers, 50 RAF airmen and 50 REME Other Ranks.

The food cargo was unloaded in 4 hours 5 minutes, Welshman’s fastest ever emptying in Malta, and second fastest ever.  The Governor and Commander in Chief Viscount Gort sent a personal message to 1st Bn Cheshire Regiment:  “Congratulations on good work on unloading HMS Welshman.”

HMS Welshman is to be retained at Malta to be used for an operation to land troops in the Sousse area.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 18 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 19 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Showery day; thunderstorms in the evening.

0640-0710 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron and three 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne to provide protection for friendly shipping: no enemy aircraft seen.

0925-1035 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to act as escort to friendly shipping.

0945 hrs   Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are airborne to provide escort for HMS Welshman.

1725-1730 hrs; 2032-2050 hrs  Air raid alerts.  Aircraft turned out to be friendly.

Military casualties  Sapper Glanville Williams, 173 Tunnelling Company, Royal Engineers.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Welshman

ROYAL NAVY  Welshman arrived and was swept in by Hebe, who then swept P 44 out and returned with P 45 and P 48.  The two submarines arrived to join the Tenth Submarine Flotilla, having taken part in the early stages of Operation Torch as navigational marks off Algiers, then carrying out a patrol in the Gulf of Tunis. P 45 made three unsuccessful attacks in the area and P 48 two.  With all torpedoes expended they were ordered to return to Malta.

AIR HQ  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter collided and crashed on landing: crew uninjured. Departures  One Hudson, one Liberator to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  1755-1830 hrs  Two Swordfish and one Albacore set out to attack an enemy convoy in the Cape Bon area.  Very bad weather conditions forced them to turn back.

LUQA  69 Squadron Photo-reconnaissance flew seven sorties.  1824-2350 hrs  Seven Wellingtons 40 and 104 Squadrons were despatched to attack Tunis aerodrome: all bombs dropped on the aerodrome and among buildings and hangars.  All aircraft returned safely.  2325 hrs  Four special Wellingtons 69 Squadron carried out separate patrols of the east of Taranto: one hospital ship sighted.  0030-0555 hrs  Six Wellingtons were despatched on a second attack on El Aouina.  Bursts are observed in the target area and one fire is seen.

ROYAL ARTILLERY  Anti-aircraft artillery deployed for defence of convoy.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Battalion is standing by with all leave cancelled for work in connection with expected convoy.  The Battalion is Brigade reserve and has been detailed for the following duties: 42 drivers to sub-depots; 4 parties of 1 Officer and 13 Other Ranks to act as fire-fighting parties on board the merchant vessels; 150 standing by at 2 hours’ notice as a reserve for all duties.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Working party at Zabbar sub-depot: four 15 cwt and four impressed lorries; 16 Other Ranks manning trucks for convoy transport work.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Dumps and sub-depot come onto two hours’ notice.

 

19 November 1942: First Raid Since 6 November

MALTA’S WAR ROLE RECOGNISED IN BRITISH PARLIAMENT

“Malta has been one of the determining factors in the struggle for the conquest of North Africa, and we are particularly proud of the great contribution that it has made.”  Mr Robert Richards, MP for Wrexham, House of Commons, 19 November 1942

Carmelo Borg Pisani

MALTESE SPY FACES DEATH SENTENCE

The death sentence was passed today on Carmelo Borg-Pisani, who was discovered at Dingli on 21 May claiming to be Italian and found to be Maltese spying for the enemy.  His crimes are listed as espionage, taking up arms against the Government and forming part of a conspiracy to overthrow the Government.  The sentence was announced in public in Malta.

THREE SPITFIRES LOST PROTECTING CONVOY

The covering force of cruisers and destroyers rejoined the Operation Stoneage convoy at daylight today to cover the next stage of the journey of four merchant ships to Malta.  Enemy aircraft were reported carrying out reconnaissance searches for the ships but did not attack.

As the convoy approached within range of Malta, the Island’s aircraft provided umbrella cover.  The ships were sighted at dawn by Malta Beaufighters, in position 122 degrees 134 miles from Delimara.  Four Beaufighters, 42 long-range and 19 short-range Spitfires carried out continuous patrols over the convoy for the last leg of its voyage.

They faced very rough weather and during the morning three Spitfires crashed ahead of the convoy.  P/O Kelley 126 Squadron was picked up by the convoy ahead; Sgt Roberts 126 Squadron was last seen in his dinghy near the convoy.  P/O Park 185 Squadron suffered engine trouble near the convoy and had to bale out.  A destroyer sped to his rescue but he was found to be already dead.  The reasons for the other two crashes are unknown.

HMS Orion

At 1400 hours Cleopatra, Dido, Orion and the six Fleet destroyers parted company with the convoy and returned to Alexandria.  Just after 4pm the convoy’s commander reported being shadowed by enemy aircraft but there was no attack.  Having patrolled continuously from dawn till dark, Malta aircraft finally escorted the convoy safely to within 30 miles of Grand Harbour.

At dusk the first raiders to cross Malta since 6 November were reported approaching the Island.  Only one came close to dropping bombs on target, attempting to impersonate a returning RAF aircraft before being deterred by anti-aircraft fire.

Tonight operations by Malta’s RAF Wellingtons were temporarily switched from Tunis to Sicily, with bombing attacks on the German bomber bases of Catania, Gerbini and Comiso to deter attacks on the convoy.  At 2240 hours the minesweeper Speedy led the ships through the mineswept channel and they entered harbour. Approximately 3200 troops and large numbers of civilians are standing by to unload the four merchant ships as soon as they dock.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 19 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 20 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Thunderstorms and showers early, becoming fair.

1010-1105 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over the Island: nothing sighted.

1210-1400 hrs; 1255-1440 hrs  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali at a time on patrol over the approaching convoy: no sightings.

1440-1635 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol over the friendly convoy: no enemy activity.

1515-1710 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol over the friendly convoy: no enemy activity.

1824 hrs  Air raid alert for 10 enemy aircraft which approach the Island singly, in clear weather, coming to within 20 miles of the Malta convoy which is now 30 miles south of the Island.  Two Beaufighters are airborne and approach the enemy raiders which split up, most going north.  The remaining four cross over Gozo and Malta.  One raider turns and comes in over Kalafrana Bay at 5000 feet.  The searchlights illuminate the aircraft for two seconds but it is too far from the Beaufighters for them to engage.  4th Heavy Ack Ack Regt report the target as an unidentified aircraft giving friendly recognition and IFF signals.  It seems to be firing verey lights but in the wrong colours.

Mystery raider identified as possible Cant Z 1007 bis bomber

1850 hrs  B Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report the enemy aircraft flying over Ta Silch.   The raider is engaged by Bofors and small arms fire over Fort St Lucien and drops bombs in the water off Delimara, before receding out to sea.  There are no reports from the RAF of friendly aircraft being engaged by Light Ack Ack.

1901 hrs  All clear.

2200 hrs  A convoy consisting of four merchantmen escorted by a cruiser and eleven destroyers enters Grand Harbour in bright moonlight.  No hostile air activity is observed in the vicinity of the Island.

0517-0535 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft turn out to be friendly.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer Class II James Fearnside, Royal Canadian Air Force; Flight Sergeant Clifford Gray, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Sergeant William Hammond, Royal New Zealand Air Force; Sergeant Benjamin Holmes, RAF VR; Sergeant John Layton, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant John Mercer, RAF, all 104 Squadron.

Pilot Officer Gardner Kelly, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron; Flying Officer Robert Park, Royal Australian Air Force; Sergeant Henry Roberts, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 126 Squadron; Sergeant Nigel Steevenson, RAF VR, 111 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 19 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  HMS P 43 returned to Malta from taking part in Operation Torch, covering the approaches to Messina and the North west corner of Sicily. On 16 November she scored a hit with torpedoes on a medium sized tanker, then surfaced and attempted to finish her off by gunfire, but the tanker retaliated and she was forced to dive. The ship was last seen heavily listed and attempting to beach herself.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  Three Spitfires crashed in the sea due to engine trouble: two pilots drowned, one missing.  One Wellington shot down by enemy action: crew missing.

104 Squadron Wellington reported missing

LUQA Message from AOC Sir Keith Park:  “You and your squadrons are certainly leaving your mark upon the Axis.  Grand work; keep it up.”  Four sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires covering the harbours of Tunis and Bizerta.  Six sorties by Baltimores of 69 Squadron on shipping search.  A total of 14 Wellington sorties: targets Catania, Gerbini and Comiso; attacks considered successful.  Five Wellingtons 104 Squadron and two 40 Squadron were sent to bomb Catania aerodrome.  Bombs hit target and explosions were seen across the runway, buildings and dispersal areas.  There was intense light and heavy flak.  One aircraft did not return: Pilot F/Lt Mercer and crew Sgts Fearnside, Gray, Hammond, Layton and Holmes are missing.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Midnight  Bn provided three shifts of 96 Other Ranks to work 12 hour shifts unloading the Mormacmoon at Hamilton Wharf.  Each shift was split into eight gangs of 12 men.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Midnight  Two parties totalling four Officers and 78 Other Ranks reported to Canteen Steps and Hamilton Wharf for duties as lighter loading parties.  Additional personnel employed at Marina Pinto.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  All drivers reported to sub-depots by 1530 hrs.  All fire-fighting parties reported at allotted berthing places at 2200 hrs and were on board ship by midnight.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn provided 10 Officers and 231 Other Ranks for unloading M/V Robin Locksley.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties.

 

20 November 1942: Convoy Cargo Blaze – Fuel Supplies Destroyed

OPERATION STONEAGE DELIVERS

Troops to repeat success of Operation Ceres (c) IWM GM1475

At 0130 hours this morning all ships of the convoy were reported to have arrived safely in Grand Harbour.  All four merchant ships, with Euryalus and ten Hunt class destroyers berthed safely during the night.  By 3 am 3200 troops plus civilians had begun unloading the merchant ships and dispersing the cargoes to dumps.  A further 1800 troops are employed on the aerodromes.

FUEL DUMP FIRE

A serious fire has destroyed fuel supplies which had just arrived on today’s convoy.  The fire broke out at 8.15 pm this evening at a storage dump near Hamrun, igniting quantities of kerosene and petrol which had just been delivered from Grand Harbour.  It is believed that a back-fire from a transport lorry caused the blaze, which was brought under control before a very large amount of fuel was lost.  No casualties have yet been reported.

SWORDFISH CREW MISSING AFTER OFFENSIVE OPS

‘Swordfish’ lost

The pilot of a Swordfish from Hal Far has been reported missing following a strike on enemy shipping today.  One special Swordfish, one torpedo-carrying Swordfish and one Albacore were despatched to attack a 1300 ton merchant vessel bound from Sicily to Tunisia.  They found the ship 14 miles west of Marittimo and the Albacores released one torpedo but results were not observed.  The torpedo-carrying Swordfish suffered engine trouble and turned back for Malta.  The aircraft was seen to crash into the sea as it approached the Island: a search for the crew has so far found nothing.

Four Beaufighters of 227 Squadron sent to carry out an offensive sweep found a westbound Italian merchant vessel, 32 miles east of Kuriat.  They attacked at 1206 hrs, dropping two 250 lb bombs – one scored a direct hit amidships on the starboard side – and raked the vessel with cannon and machine-gun fire.  The vessel was left stalling and the crew appeared to be preparing to abandon ship.  Three Beauforts escorted by five Beaufighters were despatched at 1625 hrs to attack the same ship, scoring a probable hit with one torpedo: she was later seen sinking and abandoned.

Two JU 88s were destroyed in offensive sweeps in the Bizerta-Sicily area and tonight four Wellingtons made two attacks on Bizerta aerodrome, scoring many hits on the target area.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 21 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fair except for slight morning showers.

0625-1240 hrs  Sixteen sorties by Spitfires from Luqa as protective patrols over friendly shipping.

0840 hrs  Convoy escort of one cruiser and eight destroyers leave Grand Harbour.

0950-1106 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over the Island: nothing sighted.

1324-1347 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine enemy fighters including ME 109s approach the Island at great height, believed to be on reconnaissance.  Malta fighters are airborne and intercept the raiders north of the Island, forcing them to turn back.

1550-1650 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol over the Island: no enemy activity.

2153-2203 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft identified as friendly.

0042-0450 hrs  One Swordfish and one Albacore from Hal Far search for the crew of a missing Swordfish off the coast of Gozo: nothing seen.

Military casualties  Sergeant Leslie Drywood, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 202 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birzebbugia  Mary Farrugia, age 44.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 20 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Parthian

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Three Beaufighters from Gambut; one Beaufort, two Spitfires, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  2110-2350 hrs; 0325-0516 hrs  Two Hurricanes RNAS carried out intruder patrols over south east Sicily: no enemy air activity.

LUQA  Cinema re-opened after being damaged by fire on 25 October: film “Little Old New York”.  Four sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron over harbours and aerodromes in Italy, Sicily and Tunisia.  1255-1720 hrs  Three Beauforts 39 Squadron were despatched on an offensive sweep against enemy shipping in Misurata, Kerkenna, Pantelleria areas.  One 2000 ton motor vessel was sighted and torpedoes dropped: no definite explosion observed.

ROYAL ARTILLERY  Operation Instruction 69 orders the adjustment of aerodrome barrages to give protection to runways.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  0200 hrs  Ship docked and first food discharged by 0430 hrs.  Mormacmoon is carrying a cargo of food, petrol, bombs and ammunition.  Unloading during the day went well.

SS Robin Locksley

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  0800 hrs  Shift II: 4 Officers and 78 Other Ranks lighter duties on Mormacmoon and Robin Locksley.  2000 hrs  Shift III took over lighter duties from Shift II.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn found 8 Officers and 230 Other Ranks for convoy and has unloaded 1150 tons from Robin Locksley in past 24 hours.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties.  Additional six Officers and 250 Other Ranks engaged as Brigade reserve.

21 November 1942: 14000 Tons of Cargo Unloaded in 60 Hours

CONVOY ESCORT SAILS WITH AXIS POW

HMS Euryalus and most of the Fifth Destroyer Flotilla which escorted the four merchant ships to Malta have sailed for Alexandria.  Euryalus took with her 28 German and Italian prisoners of war.

SWORDFISH RESCUE

The crew of a Swordfish forced down into the sea off Gozo with engine trouble yesterday have been found alive.  Sub/Lt Russell-Jones and Sub/Lt Moon were picked up this morning by the Kalafrana High Speed Launch.

SITUATION REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING 21 NOVEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd: War Office

1.  Enemy air activity negligible.  Two daylight alerts for fighters probably on reconnaissance.  One night alert for 11 enemy aircraft but none crossed the coast.  Two bombs in the sea.

Gerbini aerodrome

2.  RAF offensive and reconnaissance: air activity by RAF in support of Operation Torch continues;  Beaufighters on daylight patrols area Bizerta-Sicily destroyed two JU 88s, one HE 115 shot up, two merchant vessels 2000 and 8000 tons – former hit, latter near missed by bombs.  Flak ship also shot up.  Merchant vessel 2000 tons later claimed by Beauforts.  By night Wellingtons and Fleet Air Arm aircraft scored two torpedo hits on tanker causing heavy explosions and fire.  Wellingtons bombed El Aouina, Bizerta, Catania, Gerbini and Comiso.  All attacks considered successful.  Beaufighters on night sorties shot up planes on the ground at Trapani.

3.  HMS Welshman arrived carrying stores.  Unloaded by Army personnel.  Convoy four merchant vessels escorted by cruiser and destroyers arrived safely 0030 hrs 20 November.  Cargoes being unloaded and dispersed to dumps by 3200 Army personnel and Maltese labour.  13672 tons unloaded in 60 hours.  1800 Army personnel on aerodromes.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 21 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 22 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Variable; showers late evening.

0715-0845 hrs; 0830-0925 hrs; 1055-1225 hrs  A total of 16 Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over friendly shipping.

1135-1315 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol over naval units: nothing sighted.

1235-1420 hrs; 1405-1520 hrs  A total of 16 Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far on patrol: nothing sighted.

1320-1440 hrs; 1515-1630 hrs  Four, then three Spitfires 229 Squadron on patrol: nothing sighted.

1529-1545 hrs  Air raid alert for a number of enemy fighters which approach the Island at great height, probably on reconnaissance.  None cross the coast.  Seven Spitfires are airborne and patrol from St Paul’s Bay to the north of Gozo but see no enemy aircraft.

1855-1910 hrs  Air raid alert.  Raid does not materialise.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Martin Lundy, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 229 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 21 NOVEMBER 1942

Troop transport Piemonte in former op as Minnedosa

ROYAL NAVY  The unloading of the convoy continued without any attempted interference by enemy aircraft.  Rye swept Turbulent and P 35 in from sea.  HMS P 35 returned to Malta from Operation Torch and patrol off the western coast of Calabria. P 35 sighted three Littorio battleships escorted by twelve destroyers on the 12 November off Cape Vaticano and fired a salvo of torpedoes with no damage. On 15 November she landed a rail sabotage party in the Gulf of Eufemia but owing to considerable barded wire entanglements they were forced to withdraw. At 1416 on 17 November she probably sank the 7000 ton Italian troop ship Piemonte.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Spitfire from Algier-Bone; one Liberator, one DC3 from LG 224, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Swordfish crashed in the sea: crew saved, uninjured.  One Spitfire crash-landed near Mosta: pilot killed.  One Wellington force-landed near Bone: crew believed safe.  One Beaufighter crash-landed on the aerodrome: crew uninjured.  Departures   One Hudson to Gibraltar.

LUQA  1442-2013 hrs  Six Beauforts 39 Squadron and other aircraft were despatched on an offensive sweep in the area south of Malta to attack any southbound enemy shipping.  Nothing of importance was seen; all aircraft returned safely.  One Wellington 104 Squadron and four Beaufighters 46 Squadron were despatched to attack Trapani aerodrome which was shot up by the Beaufighters.  Aircraft on the runway were attacked with cannon fire.  Six special torpedo-carrying Wellingtons 69 Squadron were airborne to attack a southbound enemy convoy of one cruiser, four destroyers and six merchant vessels.  Bad visibility prevented the attack and all torpedoes were brought back to base.

TA QALI  1235-1600 hrs  Six Beaufighters 272 Squadron acted as escort to Beauforts 39 Squadron for strike on shipping.  1250-1715 hrs  Three Beaufighters despatched on an offensive sweep and reconnaissance in the area of Sousse, Sfax and Gabes: one HE 115 destroyed, one Flak ship shot up.  1255-1715 hrs  Three Beaufighters 272 Squadron on offensive sweep and reconnaissance: W/Cdr Buchanan destroys one HE 115; F/Lt Rankin and F/O Cobley damage a flak ship.  Two Beaufighters damaged by flak and crash on returning to base.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Unloading going well: cargo is fairly easy to handle.  No 5 hold is finished as far as we are concerned; the remainder of its contents is coal.  There is an occasional shortage of lighters.  Our ship has 8000 tons of cargo.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Convoy duties as for yesterday.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties.  Additional six Officers and 250 Other Ranks engaged as Brigade reserve.

(1)  Bank Notes of the Government of Malta, John E Sandrock, http://www.thecurrencycollector.com

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

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8-14 November 1942: Fortress Malta Underpins North African Invasion

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8 November 1942: Malta Aircraft & Submarines Join Operation Torch

Operation Torch troops hit beaches near Algiers

Under cover of darkness early this morning scores of thousands of American troops were landed on the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts of French North Africa.  The objective is to forestall an Axis invasion, remove the threat of an attack on America from the West African coast, and establish an effective second front to assist Russia. British divisions will follow the Americans.

Marshal Petain has ordered the French African Army to resist, and Vichy Radio reports fighting east and west of Algiers. It is reported from Allied Headquarters that initial objectives have been achieved in landings on two important beaches, and that US airborne troops were first landed to seize aerodromes and vital channels of communication.(1)

Malta’s task is now to hinder the enemy’s attempts to rush men and materials into the north east corner of Tunisia by sea and air.  Twenty submarines of the 1st, 8th, and 10th Flotillas are operating from the Island as part of Operation Torch and other Malta-based vessels will come under operational control of Captain (S), 10th Submarine Flotilla, when east of longitude 8 degrees east.

Wellington bombers are to make sorties against targets in Tunisia, Sardinia and Sicily.  They opened their offensive last night with an attack on Cagliari (Elmas) aerodrome to cover the arrival of the Allied landing force in Algeria.

With the opening of the new campaign in North Africa, the role of Malta’s photo-reconnaissance pilots has also been changed, from covering Libyan convoys to monitoring the Italian battle fleet.  They will now be covering Taranto, Messina, Navarino and Naples two or three times a day.

BRITISH BOMBERS USING DELAYED ACTION FUZES

Three special Wellingtons despatched on shipping searches sighted one merchant vessel with escort.  Seven Wellingtons were despatched to attack Elmas and Decimomannu aerodromes: the results were difficult to asses as many of the bombs had long delayed action fuzes.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 9 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine/fair.

No air raids.

0925-1015 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1720-1745 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on dusk patrol: no sightings.

2045-2240 hrs; 0320-0455 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron at a time patrol over the Island and surroundings: no enemy aircraft seen close to Malta.

Military casualties  Flying Officer John Greig, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flying Officer Peter Mould, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Walter Owen, RAF VR; Flying Officer Roy Quarendon, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Hilgrove Teale, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Frank Snelling, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Edward Robbins, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Thomas Parker, RAF VR; Sergeant Ernest Stott, RAF VR; all 233 Squadron.  Flying Officer Harry Lethbridge, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 8 NOVEMBER 1942

Cape San Vito

ROYAL NAVY  1125 hrs  Submarine HMS P 44 witnessed an attack on a Regolo class cruiser by HMS P 46, 16 miles northwest of Cape San Vito, which blew a considerable portion of the cruiser’s bow away.  P 44 attempted to finish her off but missed, though an escorting destroyer may have been hit.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Beauforts from Mariut; three Spitfires from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Liberator, two LG 224s to DC 3.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed: pilot seriously injured.

HAL FAR  One Spitfire on a practice flight crash-lands: pilot unhurt.

LUQA  Nine sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires covering aerodromes and harbours of Sicily, Pantelleria and southern Sardinia.  Seven Wellingtons (four 104 Squadron, three 40 Squadron) were despatched to bomb Elmas and Decimomannu aerodromes.  Five aircraft dropped bombs on Elmas aerodrome, scoring hits on the runways and doing considerable damage.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  All duties at Luqa aerodrome taken over by 2nd Bn Royal Irish Fusiliers.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the past 24 hours has found working parties at Hal Far as for Nov 7th.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  9 trucks, 1 motor-cycle, 1 Officer and 20 Other Ranks reported for fatigue duties on Ta Qali.

 

9 November 1942: Axis Fighters Move From Sicily to Tunisia

Over 80 enemy fighters are reported to have left Sicily since Wednesday.  It is believed that many of them are heading for Tunisia, as part of the effort to hold that territory in the face of the recent invasion.

FLEET AIR ARM ATTACK CONVOY

Fairey ‘Swordfish’ with torpedo

At midnight two torpedo-carrying Albacores and one torpedo-carrying Swordfish co-operated with a special Swordfish in an attack on three enemy cruisers and several destroyers en route from Navarino to Messina in position 144 degrees Spartivento 75 miles.  Three torpedoes were aimed at the cruisers but an effective smoke screen was put up.   Two explosions were observed, but all three cruisers were subsequently located at Augusta.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 10 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair to cloudy; clearing later.

No air raids.

1320-1425 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on practice flying and intercept patrol: no sightings.

1400-1440 hrs; 1525-1625 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne at a time on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Night  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa is airborne for a raid which does not materialise.  It patrols north of Malta at 12000 feet but sees no enemy aircraft.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Charles Brennan, Royal Canadian Air Force, 544 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 9 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde sailed being swept out by Hebe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Wellington from Gianaclis.  Departures  One Spitfire photo-reconnaissance to Kilo 8.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington failed to return from operations: crew missing.

LUQA  Seven sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires which covered the aerodromes of southern Sardinia and harbours of Sicily, Tunis and Bizerta.  Three special Wellingtons 69 Squadron carried out shipping searches of Taranto, Messina and Sardinia areas.  One cruiser and three destroyers were sighted.  One aircraft failed to return: P/O Matthews, P/O Moffat, P/O James, P/O Reay, P/O Burgess, Sgt Watt missing.

Decimomannu aerodrome aerial view

1913-0330 hrs  Seven Wellingtons (three 40 Squadron, four 104 Squadron) were despatched to attack Elmas and Decimomannu aerodromes.  Bombs were dropped on the aerodromes and on buildings to the south.  Some Heavy Ack Ack was encountered.  All aircraft returned.  2020-2125 hrs  Three torpedo-carrying Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were despatched to attack shipping in the Navarino area: no enemy aircraft seen.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  0900 hrs  Convoy duties: 3 NCOs and 15 Other Ranks reported to Camerata Barracks for duties as tally clerks.  1 Officer, 5 NCOs and 16 Other Ranks reported to Mifsud’s Verandah for duties at Broken Case Store.  1200 hrs  1 Officer, 1 Warrant Officer and 12 Other Ranks reported for duty at Zabbar motor transport sub-depot.

1500 hrs  Transport and 26 drivers reported to sub-depot for duty.  Unit transport involved eight 15 cwt trucks, two 30 cwt trucks and three impressed vehicles.  1700 hrs  Green Dump established at San Gregoriu Church: 3 Officers, 11 NCOs and 50 Other Ranks reported for duty.  1 Officer 3 Other Ranks reported for duty with Docks Unit.  3 NCOs 18 Other Ranks reported Porte des Bombes for fire fighting duties at Docks.

1st Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  1730 hrs  18 Officers 361 Other Ranks in position at five convoy dumps and one motor transport sub-depot, locations Pawla, Attard, Tal Balal, L’Imsierah, Hamrun and Gzira.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

10 November 1942: Enemy Transport Aircraft Arrive in Med

Axis command has introduced large numbers of transport aircraft into the Central Mediterranean area.  The planes were reported by pilots returning from reconnaissance missions over Trapani and Tunis, where no fewer than 40 of the aircraft have arrived since yesterday.

ME 323 Transport Aircraft

The majority of the new aircraft are JU 52s but a few larger models have also been seen, including JU 90s, FW 200s and ME 323s.   The latter is a six-engined plane with a 180 foot wingspan and is believed capable of carrying 40-50 fully equipped troops.  The transport aircraft have been observed flying in convoys of 25-30 planes each.

The transport fleet is understood to be part of the renewed efforts North African campaign by Axis forces.  Intelligence reports indicate that the enemy intend to occupy and defend as much as possible of Tunisia.  In response, Malta Air Command have been instructed to transfer the main weight of their bomber effort to the aerodrome of El Aouina at Tunis, where many of the Axis transports and some large gliders are concentrated.

MALTA AIR CREW CAPTURED

Junkers JU 90

One of nine Beaufighters of 272 Squadron despatched to attack German aircraft on El Aouina aerodrome in Tunis last night has been reported missing.  Visibility was good, with only a slight ground haze when the Beaufighters attacked in waves of four, strafing aircraft on the ground.  They reported destroying five JU 52s, two JU 90s and one JU 87, one large glider and a twin-engined aircraft.  They also damaged three JU 87s, two ME 109s, two JU 52s, one large glider, three twin-engined aircraft and five more unidentified aircraft.

The aerodrome’s defences opened up with small gun fire: one Beaufighter appears to have been hit: it was seen by crews of the other aircraft making a successful emergency landing near the airfield.  As the area is French territory the crew are likely to be interned if captured.

A Wellington bomber is also missing after an attack on Elmas aerodrome.  The bomber was one of seven Wellingtons sent to attack the airfield.  Bombs are reported to have fallen all over the aerodrome and runway, causing 17 small fires – believed to be aircraft.  Many hits were scored on an ammunition dump which exploded.

One torpedo-carrying and one bomb-carrying Wellington returned safely after attacking Axis shipping.  The two Wellingtons were on shipping reconnaissance west of Benghazi when they found a westbound merchant ship with a single escort vessel 80 miles east of Misurata.  One of the Wellingtons dropped flares, while the other attacked the merchantman with three 500 lb bombs, scoring near-misses.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 11 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair to fine.

No air raids.

0650-0800 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0740-0840 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to act as escort to friendly shipping.

0830-0945 hrs; 0945-1035 hrs  Three and then four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1018-1118 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over the Island at 12-15000 feet.

1100-1230 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0320-0338 hrs  One air raid alert for a single aircraft which proves to be friendly.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer II Byard Fisher, Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF); Flying Officer Francis James, RCAF; Flying Officer Allison Burgess, RCAF; Sergeant Ralph Bland, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant Hugh Locke, RCAF; Flying Officer William Mathews, RCAF; Flying Officer Verdun Ray, RCAF; Flight Sergeant Frank Lewsley, RAF VR; Flying Officer Bernard Moffatt, RCAF; Warrant Officer II Burchester McNall, RCAF; Warrant Officer II Frank Olsen, RCAF; all 69 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 10 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Porpoise

ROYAL NAVY  HMS Porpoise was retained at Malta for a possible landing of military personnel in the Sousse area to captain certain coast defence guns.  0710 hrs  During patrol for Operation Torch HMS Una sighted an enemy force of three 6 inch cruisers, escorted by six destroyers in position 37-11N, 15-30E. Una attacked but missed the cruisers, but a fleet destroyer on the far side of the screen was hit and sunk.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter landed in French territory: crew believed to have been interned.

LUQA  Seven sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires covering aerodromes and harbours in Sicily, northern Sardinia, Tunis and Bizerta.  1645-0450 hrs  Three torpedo-carrying Wellingtons and one special Wellington 69 Squadron were despatched to locate and attack enemy snipping in the Navarino area.  The special Wellington sighted three cruisers and two destroyers.  1730-0535 hrs  Four special Wellingtons 69 Squadron were airborne to search for enemy shipping in the Straits of Messina: no important sightings made.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1300 hrs  1 Officer, 7 NCOs and 16 Other Ranks reported at Docks for fire fighting duties on ships.  10 NCOs and 40 Other Ranks standing by as General Duty reserve.  Other convoy duties as yesterday.  5 Other Ranks reported as reserve drivers to sub-depot.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the past 48 hours has found working parties at Hal Far: 4 x 15 cwt trucks for food delivery, servicing aircraft and for mobile vehicle repairs; 2 impressed lorries for crater-filling; 2 motor-cycles for motor control work; 16 Other Ranks working above trucks.  At Zabbar sub-depot: 4 x 15 cwt trucks.

1st Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Dumps and sub-depot on four hours readiness.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

 

11 November 1942:  Qrendi Air Strip Opens

Qrendi air strip (NWMA Malta)

Qrendi air strip officially opened yesterday afternoon.  His Excellency the Governor and Commander in Chief Viscount Gort performed the opening ceremony which was attended by commanders of all Services.  The Air Officer Commanding was given the honour of being the first pilot to use the new airfield, taking off in a fighter immediately after the formal proceedings.  The air strip is now expected to be fully operational.

MERCHANT SHIP GROUNDED EN ROUTE FOR MALTA

HMS Manxman grounded early this morning as she was embarking to bring supplies to Malta.  Manxman sailed from Alexandria at 0500 hours escorted by destroyers Dulverton, Beaufort, Aldenham, Hurworth and Belvoir.

On passing through the boom, the merchant vessel grounded outside the quarantine breakwater of Alexandria Harbour. She was refloated an hour later with the help of a tug.  An inspection of the hull reported no apparent damage and she was declared safe to proceed. After dark, the destroyers turned back for Alexandria and Manxman is reported continuing towards Malta at high speed.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 12 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair to cloudy.

No air raids.

1230-1340 hrs; 1345-1430 hrs  Four and then five Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali search for a submarine: no sightings.

1425-1535 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far search for the submarine but find nothing.

1450-1525 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1505-1810 hrs  Six Beaufighters were despatched to patrol the area between Cape Bon and Trapani.  One HE 115 was destroyed and one schooner shot up.

1620-1655 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

2020-2125 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron patrols over the Island: no enemy aircraft sighted.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Charles Hall, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant Basil Conway, RAF; Sergeant Claude Hotchkiss; Sergeant Kenneth Keston, RAF VR; Sergeant George Love, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant Geoffrey Maxton, RAF; Sergeant Eric Mudd, RAF VR; Sergeant William Parsons, RAF; Sergeant Harold Watson, RAF VR; all 210 Squadron.  Lieutenant Gordan Brodziak, South African Air Force; Flight Sergeant Malcolm Humphrey, RAF; Sergeant William Lip-Guey, Royal New Zealand Air Force; Sergeant Wallace Moss, RAF VR; all 608 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Zejtun  Joseph Busuttil, age 58.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 11 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 46 was swept in by Hebe, returning from patrol off Cape San Vito for Operation Torch. At 1123 on 8th November in position 38-14N, 12-43E she torpedoed and hit a Regolo class cruiser heavily escorted by destroyers. This hit was confirmed by a subsequent reconnaissance of Palermo.

Liberator Lands in Malta

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Spitfire photo-reconnaissance from Gibraltar; one Liberator, one DC 3, one Wellington from LG 224.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One photo-reconnaissance Spitfire failed to return: pilot missing.  One Wellington failed to return from operations: crew missing.  One Wellington shot down in the sea: crew picked up uninjured.

LUQA  0800 hrs  One 5-6000 ton motor vessel is seen 10 miles south of Naples.  Night sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron cover aerodromes in Italy, Sicily and southern Sardinia.  2010-0125 hrs  Two Wellingtons 40 Squadron and three 104 Squadron were despatched to attack Tunis aerodrome.  Bombs were dropped on the target, causing considerable damage.  Night  Four Wellingtons were airborne on reconnaissance and patrol, covering the Straits of Messina area: no important sightings made and all aircraft returned safely.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Ships’ fire fighting party stands down.  Other convoy duties as for yesterday.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  4 Other Ranks temporarily attached to 1st Bn Cheshire Regt as tally clerks on docks.  1 Other Rank temporarily attached to Docks Unit as batman.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

12 November 1942:  Manxman Arrives With Supplies and Men

HMS Manxman

HMS Manxman entered Grand Harbour at 5 o’clock this afternoon after a successful 1000 mile passage through the eastern Mediterranean from Alexandria.  Manxman was carrying 350 tons of varied foodstuffs including much needed supplies of powdered milk, dried cereals, and preserved meat.  There were also 200 passengers, including RAF and Army personnel, for Malta.  The food was loaded into heavy sacks which slowed the unloading process.  Despite this 1st Bn Cheshire Regiment managed to complete the task by 0230 hours.  The cargo was immediately dispersed to safe keeping in the Island’s storage facilities.

A second supply run by HMS Welshman from the east has been delayed.  The ship set out from the UK on 1st November but has been delayed by bad weather in the eastern Meditteranean.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 13 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Rain early becoming fair.

No air raids.

0835 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled: raid does not materialise.

0855-1010 hrs  Twelve Spitfire sorties by 126 Squadron Luqa and twelve by 1435 Squadron: no enemy aircraft seen.

1345-1450 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to act as escort to approaching ship: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1415-1540 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron patrol over the ship 20 miles off Kalafrana.

1435-1520 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1500 hrs  B Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a circular object with red painted horns floating in the sea 100 yards offshore.

1536-1845 hrs  Seven Beaufighters were despatched to patrol over the Tunis-Sicilian channel.  Five Savoia Marchetti 82s with German markings were sighted 40 miles south east of Pantelleria on a northerly course.  A further SM 82 with Italian markings was following behind.  The Beaufighters attacked and destroyed them all.  Several khaki-clad figures were seen struggling in the water.

1735 hrs  C Coy 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report flashes on the horizon due east of Della Grazia, identified as possible gun fire.

1825 hrs  Air raid alert sounds for approaching aircraft which turn out to be friendly.

0405 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a red glare on the horizon off Della Grazia.

Military casualties  Sergeant Bruce Norman, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 154 Squadron, RAF.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 12 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Utmost

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Utmost in from patrol, and then went out again to sweep Manxman into Grand Harbour.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Wellington from LG 224.  Departures  One DC3, one Liberator to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Two Beaufighters overshot runway on landing: crew uninjured.  One Beaufort crashed on landing: crew uninjured.  One Spitfire belly-landed at Luqa: pilot uninjured.

LUQA  The Air Officer Commanding has sent personal congratulations to ground staff for achieving a record high level of serviceability, including 100% Spitfire serviceability, demonstrating excellent teamwork on the part of all concerned.  Seven sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires covering aerodromes and harbours in Sicily, Sardinia and Tunis.

1805-0505 hrs  Six Wellingtons attacked El Aouina aerodrome, starting many fires and causing a large explosion – believed to be a fuel dump.  The Wellingtons made a second sortie against the target and caused more fires.  Bombs were seen to explode near hangars and a gun position was silenced.  All aircraft returned safely.  2015 hrs  Six Wellingtons (two of 40 Squadron, four of 104 Squadron) were despatched to attack Tunis.  All bombing was confined to the aerodromes: fires and large explosions seen.  0120-0540 hrs  Five Beauforts 39 Squadron were despatched to lay mines in the approachs to Tunis harbour.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Bn ‘stood by’ to unload HMS Manxman.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1630 hrs  General Duty reserve reported to No 5 Dock and were employed in unloading HMS Manxman.  Other convoy duties as for yesterday.

4th HEAVY ACK ACK REGIMENT  PM  Orders given to preset ammunition for ship barrage for HMS Manxman.  Dockyard barrages now have priority.

1st Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Red, Brown and Blue [Supply] Dumps remain in position.  White and Pink Dumps stand down except for skeleton guard.  Sub-depot continues operating.

1st Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  E Company apprehended 6 civilians smuggling eggs and cheese from Gozo: they were handed over to the civil police.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

 

13 November 1942: Malta Fighters Disable 13 Axis Transport Planes

Focke-Wulf FW 200

Seven Beaufighters patrolling the Tunisian-Sicilian channel at 5000 feet today sighted large formations of enemy transport planes flying at 100 feet.  The Beaufighters attacked, destroying six enemy aircraft and probably destroying seven.  One Beaufighter is missing and six were slightly damaged in the attack.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 13 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 14 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Cloudy.

No air raids.

0845-0920 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol north of the Island: nothing sighted.

1100-1315 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne and patrol as far as Mandia but see no aircraft or shipping.

1535-1700 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on patrol see a Spitfire crash into the sea and cover the pilot in his dinghy until he is picked up by the High Speed Launch.

1535-1845 hrs  Seven Beaufighters 272 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol sight and attack six Savoia Marchetti  82s, shooting all six down into the sea.  Two Beaufighters are damaged in combat: one crash-lands at base and is written off.

1612-1707 hrs  One Swordfish RNAS Hal Far is despatched on Air Sea Rescue and drops a dinghy to a pilot in the sea 16 miles west of Dingli.  He is later picked up by the High Speed Launch.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer II John Stephen, Royal Canadian Air Force; Sergeant Samuel Whear, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; both 227 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Una and P 44 were swept in by Rye after missions for Operation Torch.  HMS P 44 was returning to Malta from patrol off the northwest of Sicily.   HMS Una was back from patrol off the southern approaches of Messina and Port Augusta.  Speedy, Hythe and Hebe carried out searching sweep of QBB 298 and swept six mines.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Spitfires from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Spitfire photo-reconnaissance to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Four Beaufighters damaged by enemy action: crews uninjured.  Two Beaufighters crash-landed at Luqa: crews uninjured.  One Beaufighter shot down in the sea: crew missing.  One Spitfire missing in transit from Gibraltar to Malta.

LUQA  Six sorties were flown by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires covering the harbours of Naples, Taranto and Messina.  Two Baltimores 89 Squadron searched for shipping in the Marittimo area.  Night  One special Wellington 69 Squadron was sent on a shipping search in the area Cavoli-Marittimo: a number of sightings.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  0315 hrs  General Duty reserve completed unloading duties.  Personnel employed at Green Dump reduced to 3 NCOs and 12 men on guard duties.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

 

14 November 1942: El Aouina Under Fire

Axis aircraft destroyed at El Aouina

At 1525 hours this afternoon seven Beaufighters of 272 Squadron based at Ta Qali were sent to attack El Aouina aerodrome in Tunis.  Despite intense flak over the target, they strafed the airfield, destroying three JU 52s and three JU 88s, and damaging one JU 87 and one single-engined aircraft on the ground.

Two Beaufighters have been reported missing following the raid.  One was seen making an emergency landing on the beach at Tunis: the crew S/Ldr A Watson and P/O C F Cutting are believed taken prisoners of war.  The whereabouts of the other crew, F/Lt Bale and Sgt Soutter,  are unknown.  The remaining Beaufighters landed safely at 1850 hours this evening.

Tonight seven Wellingtons were despatched to attack El Aouina.  Bombs explode on the landing ground and in dispersal areas, starting several fires.  The Wellingtons made a second sortie and bombs were seen exploding among the buildings, starting two large fires.  All aircraft returned safely.

SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 14 NOVEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt:  The War Office

1.  No enemy air activity.

2.  Much offensive and reconnaissance air activity in support of Operation Torch.  Beaufighters on daylight shoot-ups El Aouina, destroyed ten transport planes, one large glider, five other planes.  Damaged two transports, one glider and five other planes on the ground.  Beaufighters and Spitfires on patrol Tunisian Sicilian channel intercepted and destroyed 20 transport planes and three other planes; probably destroyed seven transport planes.

By night Wellingtons and Fleet Air Arm aircraft scored torpedo hits: one, possibly two, cruisers near misses with bombs on one merchant vessel.  Wellingtons bombed Elmas and El Aouina where much damaged caused.  Also Cagliari and Decimomannnu.  Beauforts laid mines on approaches to Tunis.

3.  HMS Manxman arrived with approximately 350 tons foodstuffs unloaded by army personnel.  Large working parties on aerodromes continue.

4.  Qrendi landing strip opened.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 14 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 15 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather Fair.

No air raids.

0645-0810 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0900-1015 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa patrol 30 miles north east of Malta in response to a report of a possible air raid: enemy aircraft do not approach the Island.

Messerschmitt Bf 110

1000-1255 hrs  Eight long-range Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa carry out a reconnaissance patrol over the Tunisian-Sicilian channel.  They sight one BR 20 with escorting fighters and attack: P/O Piggot destroys one BR 20; P/O Hibbert destroys one ME 110.  Sgt Hendry damages one JU 90 and Sgt Mortimer damages one ME 110. 

1400-1630 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron carry out reconnaissance in the Cape Bon area.  P/O Kirkman or Sgt Kebble destroy one BR 20; F/Lt McLennan destroys one SM 82 [later identified as S 75].

1155-1325 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol north of Gozo: nothing sighted.

1215-1555 hrs  Eight Beaufighters on patrol destroy one JU 88, one SM 85 and one ME 109.  Two Beaufighters are reported missing.

1400-1630 hrs  Eight Spitfires on reconnaissance patrol sight a BR 20 and a SM 82 and attack, destroying them both.  Four  Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol as far as Lampedusa and Linosa: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1505-1650 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1605-1735 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrol: they chase one enemy aircraft but do not engage.

1645 hrs  Seven Beaufighters patrolling the Sicilian channel destroy one HE 114.

Military casualties  Sergeant Cecil Candler, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Sergeant John Hughes, RAF; Flying Officer Robert Pearson, RAF; Flying Officer David Witherspoon, Royal Canadian Air Force; all 227 Squadron.  Flight Lieutenant Leslie Bale, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Robert Soutter, RAF VR; both 272 Squadron. Flight Lieutenant Francis Bassett, RAF, 152 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant George Davidson, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 14 NOVEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Spitfire, six Hudsons from Gibraltar; two Beaufighters from ECDU; two Baltimores from LG 227; two Liberators from LG 224; four Wellingtons from Gianaclis.  Aircraft casualties  Four Beaufighters shot down by enemy aircraft: crews missing.  One Beaufighter force-landed in French territory: crew saved.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  3 x 1 ton lorries and six Other Ranks reported for transport duties on Luqa.  3 trucks and 6 drivers reported for Brigade special duties at Naxxar.

3rd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  200 men began pen-building at Qrendi aerodrome.  1600 from various units are distributed on the other aerodromes, assisting with maintenance and servicing.

(1) Adapted from Sydney Morning Herald 9 November 1942

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1-7 November 1942: Fuel Shortages Threaten Malta’s Role in War

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1 November 1942: ‘Spy Ship’ to Relieve Malta Fuel Shortage

Desperate shortages of aviation fuel in Malta have forced Allied naval commanders to come up with an innovative solution.  Intensive enemy air and sea activity makes it impossible to run a convoy through the eastern Mediterranean.  Instead, they have decided to send a captured former Italian ship disguised as an Axis supply vessel to carry supplies to the Island.

Former MS Rodi now Empire Patrol

The former Italian ship MS Rodi was seized by British Contraband Control at Malta on 10 June 1940, the eve of Italy’s declaration of war.  Renamed Empire Patrol she has since been in use by the Ministry of War Transport.

The plan is to disguise the ship under Turkish colours and send her unescorted through Turkish waters east of Cyprus.  She will then change to Italian colours and turn westwards, taking a standard route of Italian freighters bound from the Dardanelles to Southern Italy.

The Empire Patrol was loaded with 1200 tons of aviation fuel and 3000 tons of benzene, all carried in cans.  She left Alexandria this afternoon, steaming northwards at 15 knots.

E BOATS IN MALTA WATERS

Enemy E boats were spotted tonight off the coast by observers of 1st Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment.  Reports described a flashing light out to sea off Delimara.  The searchlights at Fort Delimara were illuminated and gun batteries opened fire on the E boats: no claims are reported.  It is believed that the enemy vessels were engaged in minelaying.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 1 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 2 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Cloudy to fair; slight shower early.

No air raids.

1205-1240 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled for a raid that does not materialise.  One Spitfire crashes, killing Pilot Officer Wright.  C Company 1st Bn Royal West Kent Regiment mount a guard on the crashed Spitfire at Tal Hlas Church, Zebbug.

2245 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a light flashing out to sea.

0200 hrs  D and B Companies 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report lights exposed and two rounds fired by Fort Delimara.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Patrick Attenborough, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (VR); Pilot Officer Austin Bettridge, Royal Air Force; Sergeant Douglas Jenkins, Royal Air Force VR; Flight Sergeant Arthur Smith, Royal Air Force; Wing Commander Hubert Styles, Royal Air Force, all 233 Squadron; Pilot Officer Russell Wright, Royal Air Force VR; Warrant Officer II Albert Powles, Royal Canadian Air Force; Private Thomas Seville, 1st Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 1 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 43 and P 37 were swept out by Hebe and Rorqual by Rye.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Beaufighter, one DC 3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crash-landed: pilot killed.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

LUQA  One Spitfire was sent on reconnaissance of Patras and a shipping search of Cape Katakola.  The 5-6000 ton tanker seen off Cape Maria di Leuca on 29 October was lying in the roads off Patras Harbour with a destroyer.  One Baltimore 69 Squadron sent on shipping search of Sapienza south of Cape Matapan area sighted nothing.

TA QALI  No operations.

2 November 1942:  Operation Supercharge

‘Operation Supercharge’ tanks in W desert (c) IWM E18972

Overnight, Allied forces began an attack westward in the northern sector of the North African campaign under ‘Operation Supercharge’.  By dawn today they had reached their final objectives.  Meanwhile diversionary attacks were made in the central and southern sectors with some success.

RNAS ATTACK AXIS MERCHANT SHIP

Late this afternoon a Spitfire of Malta’s photo-reconnaissance unit spotted a convoy of one 5000 ton merchant vessel, one destroyer and one flak ship 15 miles east of Tripoli and heading eastwards.  At 2300 hours one special Swordfish and two Albacores were despatched to attack.  At 0151 hours they found the convoy 45 miles east of Homs.  The Albacores dropped two torpedoes which were seen to run well but the results could not be observed.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 2 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 3 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine.

1340-1409 hrs  Air raid alert for 24 enemy fighters including fighter bombers approaching the Island at a great height.  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are airborne on a practice flight when they are diverted to intercept the approaching formation but they see no hostile aircraft.  Spitfires of 126 Squadron Luqa, plus seven Spitfires 229 Squadron and four 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept reported enemy raiders: no sightings.

Raiders head for Luqa airfield and attack.  RAF Regiment ground defences open up with machine gunfire and destroy one ME 109 which blows up in the air and crashes near Kirkop.  Bombs are dropped on Luqa, Kirkop and Misrah Blandun.  Ack Ack guns also fire: no claims.

1617-1638 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 enemy fighters approaching the Island at high altitude.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and are jumped by ME 109s.  Sgt Weir is injured in the thigh and crash-lands back at base.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled but sight no raiders.  Six ME 109s cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

Enemy aircraft are reported as having a painted white band around the fuselage aft of the cockpit.

0436-0515 hrs  Air raid alert for four enemy bombers which drop bombs on Imtarfa, Rabat, Luqa, Zebbug and Birkirkara, damaging property, killing seven civilians and injuring 15.  Two nursing sisters are injured at Imtarfa.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Malta fighters are airborne: no interceptions.

Military casualties   Nil.                                                 Civilian casualties  (See 3 November).

Enemy casualties  Oberfeldwebel Heinrich Slany, pilot of Messerschmitt Bf 109.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 2 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 35, P 44 and P 46 to sea for patrol swept out by Speedy and Parthian swept in by Hebe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Three Beauforts from Gibraltar; one Liberator from LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crash-landed due to enemy action: pilot injured.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron made photo-reconnaissance of Porto Empedocle.  27 Spitfire sorties were made against 54 plus enemy sorties.  10 Spitfire sorties were made in reconnaissance patrols north of Malta: no enemy aircraft or shipping sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Working party 1 Officer 30 Other Ranks found by A Company to work for Royal Engineers in Floriana.

1st Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT C Company 1 Officer 50 Other Ranks on Luqa.  1 NCO 18 men assisting 173 Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers on Luqa.

3 November 1942: Empire Patrol’s Cover Blown

At 1330 hours today Empire Patrol, sailing under Turkish colours with fuel supplies for Malta, was spotted by a German Dornier 215 on reconnaissance to the north west of Cyprus.  Three hours later the ship’s monitors picked up traces of a submarine which was evidently shadowing the merchantman.

The ship had already been plagued with electrical and diesel defects which threatened her power and compromised her potential for evading attack.  The Royal Naval Reserve Lieutenant in command of the ship decided its disguise had been compromised and decided to abandon the mission.  Empire Patrol headed straight for Famagusta.

HMS Clyde

There was some relief for Malta’s ongoing fuel shortage today as HMS Clyde arrived from Beirut with a cargo of petrol and torpedoes.  This will provide a temporary top-up, but supplies are still inadequate to support the Island’s air strength, to defend itself and support the war effort in North Africa, which is now at a critical stage.

MALTA WELLINGTONS DESTROY AXIS FUEL SUPPLY

Malta-based Wellingtons launched successful attacks on enemy supply shipping tonight.  Just after 10 pm Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were despatched to attack an enemy southbound convoy heading for Benghazi.  One Wellington found two medium merchant vessels with three destroyers 118 miles north of Benghazi and attacked.  Two Wellingtons from the Middle East were in the same area and set off flares to illuminate the target.  The Malta Wellington’s torpedo scored a hit on the bows of one heavily laden merchantman, leaving it stationary and down by the bows.

A second convoy of eight vessels, including a tanker, was found 80 miles north of Cape Aamer.  Two Wellingtons attacked with bombs and two with torpedoes.  One torpedo hit was scored aft of the tanker.  A reconnaissance aircraft later reported three separate oil patches each 500 feet across at the location of the attack.  Reports confirm that one tanker and one merchant vessel were hit by torpedoes and sunk.  All aircraft returned safely.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 3 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 4 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair, becoming cloudy.

0850-0900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to practice flying and for intercept patrol: no sightings.

1047-1110 hrs  Air raid alert for about 20 enemy fighters including fighter bombers.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and sight two ME 109s but do not engage.  The raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa and Mqabba.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1342-1425 hrs  Air raid alert as 15 enemy fighters escorting fighter bombers approach the Island.  Seven Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and chase the raiders down to 10000 feet.  Yellow Section engages three Macchi 202s north of Grand Harbour: Sgt Gunstone destroys one.  One Spitfire receives a direct hit and is burned out.  A few raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa, making one runway temporarily unserviceable, and on Mqabba.

1537-1606 hrs  Air raid alert for 12 enemy fighters approaching the Island.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron airborne for practice flying and intercept patrol sight two ME 109s and give chase but cannot catch them.  Raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Zejtun and on Hal Far, where a Spitfire suffers a direct hit and is destroyed on the ground.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1630-1720 hrs  Enemy fighters attack a submarine off south coast near Delimara.  4th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment put up a protective barrage over the submarine.  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to provide a protective patrol.

0100-0137 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers which cross the coast and drop bombs on Birzebbuga and the Hal Far-Kalafrana area.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

0458-0637 hrs  Two Beaufighters on anti E boat patrol.  No E boats are seen but a schooner is sighted and shot up.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Roland Ambrose, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Sergeant Thomas Bailey, RAF; Sergeant Charles Cockburn, RAF VR; Sergeant Thomas Elder, RAF; Flight Sergeant Ronald Mitchell, RAF VR; Sergeant Harold Warren, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant Terence Sassoon, RAF VR; Sergeant Kenneth Thorne, RAF VR, all 202 Squadron.  Flying Officer Egbert Wall, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Lija  Anthony Camilleri, age 56; Saviour Cutajar, age 48; Peter Fenech, age 82; Joseph Galea, age 55; Carmela Zammit, age 24; Anthony Zammit, age 10.  Zebbug  Joseph Abdilla, age 11; Antonia Bonanno, age 16; Salvina Bonanno, age 7; Emanuel Buhagiar, age 29; Philip Muscat, age 75; Anthony Muscat, age 18; Carmela Muscat, age 5.  Gozo (Victoria)  Carmela Galea, age 56.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 3 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde arrived from Beirut and was swept in by Hythe, Speedy and four MLs; a large escort was used as it was suspected that mines were laid last night.  Speedy swept P 211, P 212 and P 217 out, and Hythe swept out Una and Utmost, to join major operations in the Mediterranean.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC 3, one Wellington from LG 224; one Liberator from Middle East.  Departures  One Beaufighter to Abusuier; one Liberator to Gibraltar; one DC 3 to Middle East.

LUQA  Spitfires 69 Squadron on photo-reconnaissance.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Working party A Company continues to work for Royal Engineers in Floriana.  1530 hrs  Funeral of the late [Lance Corporal] Tarr.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1645 hrs  Private T Seville died in No 90 General Hospital as a result of a gunshot wound to the knee.

4 November 1942: 8th Army Breaks Axis Lines

Panzer tanks in Cyrenaica

Malta troops today heard the news that the 2nd Battle of El Alamein has been won by the Allies.  Sources in North Africa report that the 8th Army has broken through in the Middle East.  The Axis losses of men and equipment is so great that Rommel has ordered his Afrika Korps into full retreat.

The skies over Malta remained silent throughout the day, giving the Island time to reflect on the significance of this major step forward in the war in the Mediterranean.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 5 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine.

No air raids.

0600-0710 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron were airborne to provide cover for Beaufighters on anti E-boat patrol.  No enemy aircraft are seen.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Harold Bardsley, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant Geoffrey Green, Royal Air Force; Sergeant Ernest Jones, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Edward Sleigh, Royal Air Force;  Sergeant Thomas Millar, RAF VR; Sergeant John Ritchie, RAF VR; Warrant Officer Joseph Keough, Royal Canadian Air Force, all 210 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 4 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Turbulent was swept in by Rye, who later swept out HM Submarines Pandora and Turbulent – the last two of the twelve submarines sailing to take up position for a major forthcoming operation in the Mediterranean.  No mines have yet been swept in the areas where the E boats were operating on the past two nights.

AIR HQ  Departures  Two Wellingtons to Gianaclis.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on photographic reconnaissance of east Sicilian aerodromes and Catania harbour.

TA QALI  229 Squadron stood down.

5 November 1942: Axis Armies Taken Prisoner

Italians led into captivity at El Alamein

Having broken through the enemy’s position on the El Alamein line, the Eighth Army have continued in pursuit of Rommel’s forces throughout today.  The Allies have taken large numbers of Axis prisoners were taken and seized vast quantities of motor transport equipment and stores. The German rearguards have attempted a delaying action with fighting southwest of the Fuka escarpment.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 6 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair.

1530-1557 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 enemy fighters which cross the coast on a sweep.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa join other fighters engaging the enemy: F/Lt Burgess damages one ME 109.

1929-1942 hrs  One Cant Z 1007 approaches the Island at 20000 feet and drops bombs in the sea over Comino Channel and St Paul’s Bay.  Beaufighter pilot S/Ldr Pain of 89 Squadron is airborne to intercept and shoots down the bomber in flames.  Two Italians are taken prisoner by the Gozo Patrol, 1st Bn King’s Own Malta Regiment.  One of them is wounded and admitted to 45 General Hospital; the other is handed over to the Camp Commander at St Andrew’s.

2250-2331 hrs  Two enemy bombers approach the Island and drop bombs in the sea off St Paul’s Bay and Grand Harbour.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 5 NOVEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Six Wellingtons from LG 224; one Wellington from Gianaclis; one DC 3 from LG 224; two Beaufighters from Middle East.  Departures  One DC3, one Liberator to LG 224.

HAL FAR  Night  The ASV Swordfish was dispatched to provide illumination for an attack on E boats by Beaufighters.  The Swordfish located and illuminated the enemy vessels but the Beaufighter strike did not make contact.

LUQA  Seven Spitfires 69 Squadron were airborne for photo-reconnaissance.

6 November 1942: Four New Squadrons in Malta

Two new Beaufighter Squadrons are now to operate from Malta.  The first aircraft of 227 and 272 Squadrons arrived today to prepare for operations.  13 Beaufighters of 227 Squadron and 16 of 272 Squadron landed safely from the Middle East ready to begin operations immediately.  They were joined by 13 Beauforts of 39 Squadron which also arrived from the Middle East.

104 Squadron Vickers Wellington Mk II

Detachments of 40 Squadron and 104 Squadrons RAF have been posted to Malta.  The Wellington medium bomber squadrons which form 238 Bomber Wing are to operate from Luqa aerodrome for the time being as part of the Allied offensive in North Africa.  Eight Vickers Wellington II aircraft of 104 Squadron, whose motto is ‘Strike hard’, have already arrived and more are expected imminently.  The policy is for 32 aircraft to be operational whenever possible.

Three other RAF squadrons in Malta were increased today with the arrival of 13 Beauforts from 39 Squadron, 13 Beaufighters 227 Squadron, 16 Beaufighters 272 Squadron from the Middle East.

SUB BRINGS STORES IN LATEST CLUB RUN

HM Submarine Porpoise arrived today, carrying further supplies of aviation fuel, plus general stores and mail for Malta.  Porpoise sailed from Beirut last Thursday for this latest submarine delivery of urgent stores for the Island, known as ‘club runs’.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 7 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair early, becoming cloudy.

1112-1200 hrs  Air raid alert as 36 enemy fighters approach the Island at great height.  Spitfires of 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled and intercept the raiders well to the north and again over the Island but the enemy escapes engagement.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled to intercept.  They are jumped by ME 109s, break formation and return to base.  One Spitfire is slightly damaged in combat: pilot unhurt.  Half the raiders cross the coast: Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds – no claims.

1420 hrs  Spitfires of 126 Squadron Luqa patrol over Malta through the afternoon.

1545-1630 hrs  Sixteen Beaufighters 272 Squadron land at Ta Qali.

1645-1740 hrs  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 6 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise arrived and was swept in by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  13 Beauforts from 39 Squadron, 13 Beaufighters 227 Squadron, 16 Beaufighters 272 Squadron from Middle East; one Beaufighter from photo-reconnaissance 69 Squadron; one Beaufighter from 89 Squadron; three Baltimores from LG 227; five Spitfires, one Liberator from Gibraltar; one Wellington from Gianaclis.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort ran into a bomb crater: crew uninjured.  One Beaufighter crashed on landing: crew uninjured.  One Wellington missing in transit from LG 224 to Malta.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.  1527 hrs; 1603 hrs Two Beauforts arrived.

LUQA  Six Spitfires 69 Squadron carried out photo-reconnaissance of Naples, Palermo, Trapani, Taranto, Augusto, Brindisi and Messina.  Six Wellingtons 69 Squadron carrying torpedoes were sent on reconnaissance for enemy naval units: no sightings.

4th Bn THE BUFFS   Personnel of Bn engaged on co-operational duties with RAF at Luqa aerodrome 0400-1900 hrs: 2 Officers 80 Other Ranks penmen & maintenance Spitfires; 2 Officers 100 Other Ranks GD bombing & refuelling Wellingtons; 2 Other Ranks GD Baltimores; 1 Officer 33 Other Ranks GD Beaufighters; 36 Other Ranks armament assistants.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Private T Seville buried at Imtarfa Cemetery.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  9 trucks, 1 motor-cycle, 1 Officer and 20 Other Ranks reported for fatigue duties on Ta Qali.

7 November 1942: Aviation Fuel Enough For 4 Weeks

MOST SECRET TELEGRAM

From:  Governor Malta                To:  Air Ministry             Rptd:  Cs in C Middle East, Brigadier Jacob, Foreign Secretary, First Sea Lord

1.  Stock of aviation fuel remaining 7th November was 1187 tons.  This includes receipts by submarine and a quantity of DTD 224 used for blending and mixing with 100 octane.

2.  Expenditure week ending 7th November was 286 tons.

SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 7 NOVEMBER 1942

Two nursing sisters injured in bombing of Imtarfa

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt:  The War Office

1.  Enemy air activity reduced: three raidless days, seven alerts, total 160 fighters and fighter bombers.  Few bombs on aerodromes.  RAF destroyed one fighter, damaged one.  Small arms destroyed one fighter.

2.  Total 13 aircraft of which five only crossed the coast.  Slight damage civilian property and Imtarfa military hospital.  Two sisters QAIMNS, 15 civilians injured; seven civilians killed.  One Cant destroyed by Beaufighter: two Italian prisoners.

3.  Offensive activity by RAF against convoys continues.  One merchant vessel, one tanker hit.  One Beaufighter on patrol Sicily destroyed one JU 88.

4.  Some E boat activity off Grand Harbour on four nights; probably minelaying.

5.  RAF heavily reinforced for Operation Torch and army providing approximately 1700 personnel for maintenance of aerodromes and servicing aircraft.

6.  Morale very high on account of successes in western desert.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 8 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather  Cloudy, becoming fine.

No air raids.

0840-0915 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled: raid does not materialise.

1115-1155 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne on patrol over Malta at 20000 feet: no enemy aircraft seen.

1430-1530 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.

2015 hrs  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are sent on patrol over western Sicily.  One Beaufighter sights a JU 88 and shoots it down into the sea.  The other Beaufighter fails to return.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Lincoln Craig, Royal New Zealand Air Force, pilot; Sergeant Keith Donald, Royal New Zealand Air Force, air gunner; Flight-Sergeant Herbert Earney, Royal New Zealand Air Force; Sergeant Oliver Holmes, air gunner, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flying Officer Samuel Morrison, Royal Air Force (VR); all 104 Squadron, RAF.  Flight Sergeant Alistair Paterson, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 7 NOVEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Five Beauforts 39 Squadron from Mariut; one Liberator, two DC 3s, four Wellingtons from LG 224; one Wellington from Middle East. Departures  One Liberator to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington crashed on land: crew killed.  One Beaufighter failed to return from operations: crew missing.

LUQA  Aircraft of 40 Squadron arrived.  Nine Spitfires 69 Squadron on photo-reconnaissance morning and afternoon.  Wellingtons of 69 Squadron and 104 Squadron were sent on shipping searches in Marittimo-Cavoli area: no shipping sighted.

4th Bn THE BUFFS   Personnel of Bn engaged with RAF at Luqa aerodrome as for 6 November.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the week 1-7th November the Bn has found working parties at Hal Far: 2 impressed lorries and 4 Other Ranks for crater-filling; 1 motor-cycle and 1 Other Ranks as special D/R.

2nd Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  9 trucks, 1 motor-cycle, 1 Officer and 20 Other Ranks reported for fatigue duties on Ta Qali. 

 

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25-31 October 1942: Turning Point in War Over Malta

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25 October 1942:  Enemy Air Attacks Declining

JU 88 bombers have gone from Malta’s skies

The enemy’s latest attempt to neutralise Malta appears to have lost momentum.  It is now two weeks since Axis forces launched heaviest bombing raids since April.   In that time some 350 aircraft have been destroyed or damaged by the Island’s defenders – including forty bombers.  Despite the concentration of bombs aimed at the three airfields, none of the runways has been put out of action for more than 30 minutes.

Since 18 October no twin-engined aircraft have approached the Island and attacks have been limited to ‘tip and run’ raids – often at high level – by heavily escorted fighter bombers.  Their only advantage has been provided by frequent heavy cloud over the Island, which has allowed the few successful raiders to get through, and provided cover for those attempting to escape Malta’s fighters.

During today the enemy carried out fighter sweeps and four fighter bomber raids on Ta Qali, Hal Far and Luqa.  140 raiders were involved in attacks, which were launched at heights ranging from 12000 to 3000 feet.  Fighters are now adopting a new tactic of receding at sea level to escape interception by the Island’s Spitfires.  There were no night air raids.

RAIDS DAWN 25 OCTOBER TO DAWN 26 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine: fair late evening.

0600-0720 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne for a raid which does not materialise.

0721-0800 hrs  Air raid alert for 25 enemy fighters including ME 109 fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept but are attacked by enemy fighters out of the sun: no claims.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled and engage the raiders north of Gozo: F/Lt Smith destroys one ME 109; Sgt Hughes probably destroys another. The fighter bombers are forced to jettison their bombs in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0815-0850 hrs  Air raid alert for 17 plus enemy fighters and fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: F/Lt Parkinson damages one Macchi 202.  Most of the raiders cross the coast and bombs are dropped on Luqa and Ta Qali.

As enemy fighters turn away from the airfield they machine-gun Heavy Ack Ack gun positions.  One ME 109 is destroyed by small arms fire and Light Ack Ack and crashes on the edge of the aerodrome.  One ME 109 is destroyed by Light and Heavy Ack Ack guns off Delimara by Height Control shooting at 18000 feet.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Tal Qali are also airborne and chase enemy fighters to within 20 miles of Sicily but cannot engage them.

0925-0951 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 enemy fighters and fighter bombers which cross the coast, dropping bombs on Hal Far.  Eight Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far to intercept but were unable to do so due to the enemy’s superior speed.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1110-1200 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1238 hrs  Air raid alert as 25 enemy fighters and fighter bombers approach Malta.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are also scrambled and attempt to engage two Macchi 202s which turn and flee.  The Spitfires chase them to ten miles off the coast of Sicily but are unable to catch them.

1234 hrs  The remaining raiders, about half, cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa, destroying one Beaufighter and damaging a Spitfire on the ground.  Gun position XHB 7 of 4th Heavy Ack Ack Regt RA destroys one ME 109.  Two ME 109 fighter bombers are engaged at 2500 feet by two guns of 225 Light Ack Ack Battery.

1248 hrs  Four fighter bombers drop bombs on the Safi strip, Kirkop and Mqabba village areas.

1300 hrs  Raiders passed.

1350-1445 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol (one returns early): no sightings.

1415-1530 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron, then four 249 Squadron are on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1517 hrs  Air raid alert for the approach of 50 ME 109s and Macchi 202s with fighter bombers.  Ten Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  One Spitfire and pilot, Sgt Park, are missing.   Seven Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and see three ME 109s but the raiders are too high and distant to intercept.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are also scrambled but fail in their attempt to engage the enemy aircraft, some of which jettison their bombs in the sea.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled and attack Macchi fighters but are jumped from above by other fighters acting as cover: no claims or losses.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.  Some raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa.

1600 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a plane crashed in the sea on the horizon.

1620 hrs  All clear.

1715-1750 hrs  Two Spitfires 126 Squadron are airborne to search for the missing dinghy of Sgt Park but find nothing.

1825-2115 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa takes up the search for the missing dinghy: nothing is found.

1940 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a green verey light 4-5 miles out to sea.

2330-0100 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is scrambled for a reported raid which does not materialise: no enemy aircraft seen.

Military casualties  Sergeant George Bushnell, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; Flying Officer Richard Bendwig, Royal Canadian Air Force; Flying Officer Millard Liebeck, Royal Canadian Air Force; Pilot Officer Nigel Park, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 126 Squadron; Flying Officer Fred Wickstrom, Royal Canadian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties  Oberleutnant Richard Eckhardt, pilot of a Messerchmitt Bf109 fighter.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 25 OCTOBER 1942

P 35 HMS Umbra

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P 35 in from patrol: the submarine returned to Malta after a four day patrol in which a heavily leaden merchant ship which had beached itself near Homs as a result of an air attack was further damaged by two torpedo hits.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Spitfires, one Hudson, one Liberator from Gibraltar; one DC 3 from LG 224.  Departures  Two Beauforts, one DC 3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire failed to return to base: pilot missing.  One Beaufort missing in transit between Malta and LG 224, believed shot down by enemy aircraft: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  One Special Swordfish and one Albacore were sent on anti-submarine patrol north of Homs: nothing seen.

LUQA  One Baltimore 69 Squadron carried out a search for enemy shipping to the east of Benghazi.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photo-reconnaissance of Cagliari.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Winter Dress came into use today.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  A and B Companies beach post firing at towed target.

26 October 1942: Malta Bombers Back On The Attack

Wellington bomber

Malta bombers have carried out their first attack on an enemy convoy since last Monday night.  Reports were received from reconnaissance aircraft of a southbound convoy off the west coast of Greece and tonight three special Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were sent to attack.

One aircraft returned unserviceable after 14 minutes but the other two pressed on towards the target area.  One of the Wellingtons located the convoy of one tanker and one merchant vessel, both about 5000 tons, 18 miles to the south west of Antipaxos.  The aircraft then lost visibility and had to abandon the attack, bringing its torpedo back to base.  But the third Wellington was able to close in on the convoy and dropped two 1000 lb bombs.  Results are not yet confirmed.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 26 OCTOBER TO DAWN 27 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Showery.

0629-0742 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far searches for a dinghy 8-10 miles north west of Gozo.  A body is seen floating in an uninflated dinghy.  The Hurricane has to return to base due to an incoming air raid.

0654-0750 hrs  Air raid alert for 35 enemy fighters including fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and see six ME 109s but they are too distant to engage.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled: P/O McLennan destroys one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat: pilot unhurt.  About half the raiders are intercepted by Malta fighters north of the Island and turn back.  The remainder cross the coast and bombs are dropped on Ta Qali.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  One ME 109 is destroyed.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat: pilot unjurt.

0813-0939 hrs  The Hurricane from Hal Far returns to the area where the pilot earlier spotted the dinghy but finds nothing.  The High Speed Launch is seen in the same area.

1039-1120 hrs  Air raid alert for the approach of 35 enemy fighters and fighter bombers.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled and engage the first wave of raiders north of the Island: F/L Rolls probably destroys one ME 109.  As incoming waves of raiders attempt to cross the coast the Spitfires force them to split up: a few get through to drop bombs near Luqa airfield.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and two ME 109 fighter bombers are engaged at 3000 feet by two guns of 225 Light Ack Ack Battery.

1410-1535 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1515-1537 hrs  Air raid alert for the approach of 40 enemy fighters and fighter bombers, including six bomb-carrying ME 109s.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept but sight nothing.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are also scrambled and intercept the raiders over the Island: P/O Walton destroys one ME 109; S/L Lovell damages another.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs are dropped near Birzebbuga, Hal Far and Ghar Dalam, where an Ack Ack ammunition dump is hit by a bomb.  60 boxes of ammunition are damaged and the dump is set on fire.  The blaze is quickly extinguished by Sgt Willis and other personnel of D Company, 1st Bn Devonshire Regt and of A Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Reg under Captain Lovering, as well as Royal Artillery personnel.

Night  No air raids.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

HMS Hebe

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 26 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hebe swept P 212 returning from an uneventful patrol in the Cape Dukato area.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Hudson, one Liberator to Gibraltar; one Wellington to Shallufa.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron was sent on a shipping search of Pantelleria and Kerkenna.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  B Company took over coast patrol and Tal Virtu observation post.

27 October 1942: RAF Sink Rommel’s Hopes For El Alamein

“The desert was quivering with heat. The gun detachments and the platoons squatted in their pits and trenches, the sweat running in rivers down their dust-caked faces. There was a terrible stench. The flies swarmed in black clouds upon the dead bodies and excreta and tormented the wounded. The place was strewn with burning tanks and carriers, wrecked guns and vehicles, and over all drifted the smoke and the dust from bursting high explosives and from the blasts of guns.”  (1)

British troops on the move in North Africa

Axis hopes of gaining supremacy in the North African suffered a double blow today thanks to Allied forces. Torpedo bombers of 42 Squadron RAF sank an oil tanker at Tobruk, destroying Rommel’s last hope for much-needed fuel supplies.  The Axis sea convoy comprised three merchant ships with four escorting destroyers and escorting planes overhead.  Allied heavy and light bombers and torpedo planes attacked relentlessly in the face of terrific fire from the destroyers. Only one of the supply ships escaped. A large merchantman blew up and the tanker was set on fire and sank.  The sinking follows several successful attacks on tankers by Malta-based air forces.  The German Field Marshal, who arrived back in North Africa on Sunday to resume command of Axis forces, now has only three days’ fuel to supply his armies.

Meanwhile the Allies scored an important victory over enemy tanks at El Alamein.  Having battled throughout the day against two counter-offensives by Rommel’s forces, this afternoon they repulsed a determined attack by Axis Panzer divisions, destroying 22 German and 10 Italian tanks before the remainder gave up.

QRENDI STRIP DEVELOPS

Troops building aircraft pens

200 servicemen are now employed building new pens at Qrendi strip.  The pens will add to the facilities at the recently-opened air strip, significantly extend the capacity for aircraft based on Malta.  The construction work increases the already significant contribution made by the Army to air operations on the Island.  Following the recent increased enemy bombardment, 1000 soldiers are now assisting the RAF in the maintenance of aerodromes, servicing and refuelling aircraft. 

AIR RAIDS DAWN 27 OCTOBER TO DAWN 28 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Fine: excellent visibility early; electric storm early morning.

0703-0722 hrs  Air raid alert for 24 enemy fighters including six ME 109 fighter bombers approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage raiders 15 miles north of the Island: S/Ldr Woods and P/O McCoy each damage one ME 109.  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled: no claims.  The remaining raiders cross the coast and approach Ta Qali from the east, dropping bombs on the airfield from a height of 10000 feet.  Heavy and Light Ack Ack engage: no claims.

0740-0845 hrs  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are airborne on intercept patrol: no enemy aircraft seen.

1013-1104 hrs  Air raid alert as 60 ME 109s and Macchi 202s including several ME 109 fighter bombers approach the coast in several waves.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron, four Spitfires 249 Squadron and eight 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but the enemy takes strong evasive action: no claims.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat: pilot slightly injured.  High explosives including delayed action bombs are dropped on Luqa and the Safi strip from about 14000 feet.  One aircraft is destroyed on the ground and another damaged.  One ME 109 is probably destroyed by Light Ack Ack.

1457-1518 hrs  Air raid alert as 40 ME 109s and Macchi 202s including fighter bombers approach the Island at great height.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and successfully attack 25 fighters and fighter bombers, which they force to jettison their bombs in the sea.  F/Lt McElroy damages one Macchi 202.  The raiders turn back at speed, along with the majority of their escort.  One Spitfire is damaged: pilot slightly injured.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are also airborne but see no enemy aircraft.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

Night  No air raids.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 27 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  The area between Grand Harbour and St Julian’s Bay was swept on 27th October by the 3rd ML Flotilla, prior to divers working on the submarine telegraph cables. Three mines were disposed of bringing the total destroyed by this flotilla to 100.

AIR HQ  Departures  One DC 3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged in enemy action crash-landed: pilot injured.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  AM GOC watched an exercise incorporating practice landings from motorized landing craft.

28 October 1942: Operation Train Brings Reinforcements

HMS Furious

The fast minelayer HMS Welshman also sailed with the convoy carrying emergency supplies for Malta.

ATTACK ON SUBMARINE BASE KILLS THREE

A dive bombing attack on Malta’s submarine base this morning killed three civilians in Sliema.  The raid was the second attempted strike at the base today – the first was beaten off by Malta fighters before the enemy aircraft reached the Island.

The air raid alert just before 9.30 am heralded a second attack by 30 raiders which approached the Island at 27000 feet.  Among them were a dozen ME 109 fighter bombers which swooped down to 12000 feet and then into a shallow dive as they crossed the coast towards their objective in Marsamxetto harbour.  Spitfires engage the raiders as they are still in their dive, causing several to jettison their bombs.  However several bombs did fall on Tigne Barracks, Sliema and Gzira, where three civilians were killed.  Civilian property was also damaged in the raid.

HMS Welshman

The Island was spared a third air raid as the enemy aircraft turned back before coming within 10 miles of the coast.

MALTA WELLINGTONS SINK ANOTHER AXIS TANKER

“The AOC sends personal congratulations to 69 Squadron on its brilliantly executed torpedo attack on the enemy convoy on the night of 28/29th October.”

A very successful attack was carried out tonight against an enemy convoy off the Greek coast.  A reconnaissance Baltimore had earlier reported a convoy of one tanker and a merchant vessel, escorted by three destroyers, off Sapienza.  Three Wellingtons 69 Squadron, one carrying bombs and one carrying torpedoes, were sent to locate and attack the vessels.  The bomb-carrying Wellington returned early with engine trouble and crash-landed, having jettisoned its bombs in the sea.

The other two Wellingtons sighted a tanker and a merchant vessel and went in for the attack.  Pilot Officer Matthews scored a direct hit on the merchant vessel with a torpedo.  Pilot Officer Donkersley arrived on the scene at 2252 hours and found no trace of the merchant vessel.  He aimed his bombs at the tanker, setting it ablaze from stem to stern.  A reconnaissance aircraft inspecting the area later found nothing but wreckage, oil streaks and a half-submerged barrage balloon.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 28 OCTOBER TO DAWN 29 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine; cloudy late evening.

0625-0735 hrs; 0635-0820 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali then eight from Hal Far on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0716-0734 hrs  Air raid alert sounds for 40 enemy fighters approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa and nine of 249 Squadron are scrambled and intercept the main formation to the north of the Island.  The Spitfires attempt an engagement from above but the enemy fighters disperse into the clouds and out of sight before heading back to Sicily: no claims.

0924-1001 hrs  Air raid alert as 30 enemy fighters and fighter bombers approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and fire short bursts at raiders as they head towards Grand Harbour, causing several to drop their bombs.  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron and eight 249 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled but do not engage.  P/O Giddings 249 Squadron crashes on take-off and is admitted to hospital with a fractured arm.  The remaining raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Sliema, Gzira and Tigne Barracks area causing damage to property and civilian casualties.  Heavy and Light Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1045-1140 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1233-1247 hrs  Air raid alert for enemy fighters approaching the Island.  Four Spitfires from Hal Far are conducting a practice flight when they see two ME 109s: they turn to engage but the enemy aircraft evade action.  All the fighters recede before coming within 10 miles of the Island but then recede.

1335-1500 hrs  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Chargeman E Wright, HM Dockyard.

Civilian casualties  Gzira  Ritz Falzon, age 19; Carmela Micallef, age 42; Vincenza Rice, age 40.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 1942

LUQA  Spitfires 69 Squadron were despatched on photo-reconnaissance of Navarino, eastern Sicily, Messina, Palermo, Gabini and Pachino.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  1600 hrs  Regiment band playing at Birkirkara.

29 October 1942: German Pilots Sick of Fight For Malta

German aircraft losses dent morale (c) IWM CM 745

The strain of fighting for air supremacy over Malta is clearly beginning to tell on the enemy air forces. “Experienced German pilots who became prisoners of war during this month have admitted to a general distaste among the German air force for fights over Malta.  This reluctance is not surprising when it is seen that, in the course of their unsuccessful October offensive, the Axis powers lost 15 air crew for every British pilot lost.”  War Diary, Air HQ, Malta October 1942

SPITFIRES AND SUPPLIES

Twenty nine Spitfires were flown off from HMS Furious today and all landed safely at Malta.  Two others remained on board the aircraft carrier due to defects.  Enemy aircraft made some attempts to intercept the incoming aircraft but continuous cover by Spitfires deterred any serious threat.

At the same time, HMS Welshman detached from the convoy ships to make independent passage to Malta.  The fast minelayer carries some 350 tons of much-needed cargo in her holds.  Welshman’s exceptionally fast speed has brought her through several supply missions to the Island and the Dockyard is preparing for a fast unload on her arrival.  After their successful delivery, Furious and her escort ships turned and set course immediately for Gibraltar.

MALTA FLOTILLA GRABS 100TH MINE

The Vice Admiral Malta reported that the Third Motor Launch Flotilla in addition to their many other valuable services had swept up their hundredth mine in the approaches to Malta.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 29 OCTOBER TO DAWN 30 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine; almost cloudless.

0750-0855 hrs  Eight Spitfires Hal Far patrol over the Island: no enemy aircraft sighted.

0910-1010 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are on intercept patrol:  no sightings.

0956-1120 hrs  Air raid alert.  42 enemy fighters approach the Island from the north in five formations of six and three formations of eight aircraft each.  They attempt to intercept delivery Spitfires as they come in to land.  Malta fighters are airborne but the enemy recede before engaging.  The delivery Spitfires land safely.

1020-1125 hrs  Seven Spitfires Hal Far patrol over Grand Harbour area: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1100-1230 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1232-1310 hrs  Air raid alert for a small number of enemy fighters on a high fighter sweep.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.  Heavy and Light Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1339-1345 hrs  Eight delivery Spitfires land at Hal Far.

1849-1910 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the Island at 22-25000 feet and drop bombs in the sea three miles north of the Island.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa patrols to the north of Malta but sees nothing.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Walter Parks, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Naxxar  Emanuel Grech, age 52.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 29 OCTOBER 1942

AIR HQ  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires crashed into construction on taking off: one pilot injured, one killed.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron was sent on photo-reconnaissance over western Sicily and Pantelleria.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron was sent on photo-reconnaissance of enemy shipping in the area Cape Ducato, Cape St Maria di Leuca and Taranto.  Two special Wellingtons 69 Squadron were sent to attack an enemy convoy sighted by a photo-reconnaissance Spitfire but did not find it.

30 October 1942: RAF Win Latest Battle For Skies Over Malta

B flight RAF 249 Squadron Malta July 42

The skies fell silent over Malta today.  The absence of air raids is an indication that the RAF has finally secured air supremacy over the Island after the failure of the latest enemy bombing campaign.  With strong fighter escort and a small number of bombers, the enemy has tried to neutralise the aerodromes in order to protect the passage of important convoys to Tripolitania and Libya.

During daylight in October the enemy flew a total of about 250 bomber and 3500 fighter and fighter-bomber sorties against Malta.  Spitfires definitely destroyed a total of 49 bombers and 78 fighters.  By night during the month Beaufighters of 89 Squadron made a total of 61 sorties including 15 intruder patrols over enemy aerodromes and harbours.  Five enemy night bombers were destroyed.  Malta’s losses were 38 aircraft destroyed, mainly Spitfires.

The policy adopted by the RAF of intercepting the enemy north of the island has proved eminently successful.  The enemy reverted to high flying tactics using cloud cover; some damage was done to the aerodromes but without any serious impact.  Finding these tactics too costly, the enemy has now left Malta well alone.

AMMUNITION USE AND FUEL RATIONING TIGHTENED

Heavy Ack Ack Brigades have issued orders restricting the firing pattern of anti-aircraft positions.   From today, only guns in certain strategic positions may engage enemy fighter aircraft, and then only by pointers.  However, all gun positions will continue to engage any enemy aircraft clearly identified as bomb-carrying.

Petrol economies are also now being strictly enforced across all Services in Malta as fuel shortages continue to concern the Island’s commanders.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 OCTOBER TO DAWN 31 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Variable becoming fine: cloudless evening.

0740-0830 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1350-1450 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Night  No air raids.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

HMS Rorqual

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 30 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  HMS Rorqual arrived with stores from Beirut, swept in by Rye.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Liberators from Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  1640-1735 hrs  Four Spitfires carried out a reconnaissance patrol over south east Sicily while four others provided cover for their return.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron was despatched on photo-reconnaissance of Tripoli.

31 October 1942: 14 Attacks On Axis Convoys

AIR RAID STATISTICS OCTOBER 1942  

  • Total number of alerts to date 3135
  • Total number of alerts this month 152
  • Number of blank days 2
  • Number of night raids 41
  • Raid free nights 19
  • Alerts for own planes 7
  • Total time from air raid alert to raiders passed 4 days, 2 hrs, 11 mins
  • Average length of alert 38.2 mins

    P 246 HMS Statesman

ROYAL NAVY SUMMARY FOR OCTOBER

Twenty seven attacks were carried out from Malta during the month, fourteen of which were successful. Three were against merchant ships already beached after air attacks. Ten merchant vessels, aggregating 23900 tons were sunk as well as one fleet destroyer, a tug, and two schooners.  The strength of the Flotilla was brought up to eleven operational submarines by the arrival of P 212 on 9th October and of P 246 on the 19th.

Four submarines continued store-carrying trips to Malta with petrol and vital supplies from Gibraltar and Beirut.  The First and Tenth Submarine Flotillas carried out many brilliant attacks on Axis convoys and shipping running to Libya. An attack on a heavily escorted southbound convoy of one tanker and three merchant ships bound for Tripoli by five submarines off Pantellaria was particularly noteworthy. Albacore and Swordfish aircraft made many attacks before the convoy ran into the submarine concentration. P 211 sank one merchant vessel, stopped after air attack, P 37 sank a destroyer and one merchant vessel in the convoy, and it possible that P 42 also damaged a merchant vessel. The latter was very accurately counterattacked and damaged, and force to return to Malta.

SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 31

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd: The War Office

1.  Enemy air activity on a much reduced scale.  16 alerts.  Total 290 Spitfire sorties against 650 enemy sorties.  No alerts after 1300 hrs 29 October.  Raids consisted of fighter bombers heavily escorted.  Many jettisoned their bombs in the sea.  A few bombs on the aerodromes.  Ack Ack dump was set on fire and extinguished by soldiers.  Spitfires destroyed three ME 109s, one Macchi 202; probably destroyed two ME 109s; damaged three ME 109s and one Macchi 202.  Ack Ack destroyed two ME 109s; probably destroyed one ME 109.  Photo reconnaissance shows a general decrease 100 enemy aircraft in Sicily but an increase on western aerodromes, particularly JU 84 (or 87)s.

2.  Eight Wellington sorties against enemy convoys.  One tanker and one merchant vessel sunk.  Two 1000 lb bombs aimed at a vessel, believed a tanker: results unobserved.

3.  Army working parties total about 600 on aerodromes and 200 men building the new Qrendi landing strip.  Minor combined operations training being carried out with MLCS.

4.  Military damage negligible.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 31 OCTOBER TO DAWN 1 NOVEMBER 1942

0755-0830 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no raid materialised; no sightings.

1100-1135 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept a possible approaching air raid which does not materialise.

1630 hrs  The regimental band and drums of 2nd Bn Royal West Kent Regiment Beat the Retreat at Sliema.  His Excellency the Governor and GOC Troops is in attendance.

Military casualties  Private Raymond Hurley, 2nd Battalion, Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment; Lance Corporal Gerald Tarr, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 31 OCTOBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC 3 from Middle East.  Departures  One Liberator to Gibraltar; one Liberator to LG 224.

HAL FAR  0630-0735 hrs  Four Spitfires patrolled over south east Sicily: nothing sighted.  2135-0235 hrs  One special Swordfish and two strike Albacores searched for shipping between Tripoli and Homs: no sightings.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Lance Corporal G A Tarr fell down a 30 foot well in Valletta and was killed.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 22-31 October the Battalion has found two impressed lorries, one motor-cycle and five Other Ranks for work in Hal Far aerodrome.  During daylight two twin Lewis guns have been manned in anti-aircraft defence of the Safi strip.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Private Hurley, A Company, died from multiple injuries caused by falling masonry.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 11.  Dealt with: 9 High Explosives  (3 x 250kg; 7 x 50kg); 173 anti-personnel bombs; 1 oil incendiary.

(1) Alamein, Cecil Ernest Lucas-Phillips, Little Brown & Co, Boston, 1962

 

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18-24 October 1942: Malta Key to El Alamein Offensive

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“The rugged and indomitable courage of the people of Malta have been an inspiration and encouragement to the Empire.”  Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet Admiral Sir John Tovey announcing a gift of £1755 from the Home Fleet to the Malta Relief Fund

18 October 1942: Petrol Running Out

Troops use cycles to save petrol (NWMA Malta)

Military chiefs met today in Valletta to discuss how to manage the rapidly decreasing fuel supplies on the Island.  Officers from all Army units were called to attend a Petrol Economy Conference held at the Castille.  With no immediate prospect of a convoy reaching Malta, the conference focused on ways of rationing fuel use in order to conserve existing stocks.  All possible methods of saving petrol were discussed and several measures decided on, which will be put into operation immediately.

THREE AXIS SUPPLY SHIPS HIT IN RAF AND NAVY ATTACKS

This afternoon a photo-reconnaissance Spitfire sighted two merchant vessels with a 5-6000 ton tanker and one 3-4000 ton merchant vessel with seven destroyers to the west of Sicily, heading southwards.  Two Swordfish and one Albacore aircraft were despatched to make a night attack but failed to locate the primary target.  They came upon a single merchant vessel of 4-5000 tons 40 miles north west of Pantelleria and attacked with a single torpedo, scoring a direct hit on the stern.  The merchantman was last seen down by the stern and going round in circles.

Reconnaissance aircraft also spotted the merchant vessel which was attacked last Wednesday night, beached near Homs.  A Swordfish and an Albacore were despatched to make another attack.  The Albacore launched one torpedo by the light of flares dropped by the Swordfish but bad visibility prevented the observation of results.

In another offensive mission tonight, four Wellingtons of 69 Squadron Luqa were despatched to attack an 8000 ton tanker escorted by two destroyers, 50 miles east of Point Stilo.  Three Wellingtons found the convoy and attacked, one torpedo hitting the tanker’s port bow and causing a red flash.  Four 500 lb and two 1000 lb bombs were also dropped but the results were not observed.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 18 OCTOBER TO DAWN 19 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Fog over the sea in the morning; light showers morning and evening.

0622-1010 hrs  Two Hurricanes Royal Navy Air Service search off Grand Harbour for a missing dinghy but find nothing.

0701-0738 hrs  Air raid alert for about 50 enemy fighters approaching the Island, escorting seven bombers.  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  Six ME 109s engage them, splitting up the Squadron formation.  P/O Reid probably destroys one ME 109.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled to intercept: F/Sgt Mortimer (126 Squadron) destroys one ME 109.  The enemy bombers turn back while still 15 miles north of the Island and only the fighters come near, some crossing the coast.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali attempt to intercept the fighters, which evade combat.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat: pilot unhurt.

1006-1106 hrs  Air raid alert for 35 enemy fighters including a four bomb-carrying ME 109s approaching the Island.  The raid probably includes some JU 88s which turn back before reaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa, eight Spitfires Hal Far and seven of 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept but do not engage the enemy.  Three ME 109s drop six high explosive bombs on Ta Qali aerodrome.

1124-1158 hrs  Air raid alert for an approaching formation of 15 enemy fighters and fighter bombers.  Seven Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  Bombs are dropped on Luqa, Ta Salib and San Christu Church area.  Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1335-1430 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 plus enemy fighters and fighter bombers which approach the Island but do not cross the coast.  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and attack two ME 109s: S/Ldr Stephens damages one.  There are reports that the fighter bombers break off and return home before reaching Malta.

1547-1701 hrs  Air raid alert for 75 plus enemy fighters including some fighter bombers which cross the coast in small groups.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and eight 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: Sgt Hamilton 1435 Squadron damages one ME 109.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far, plus four 229 Squadron and eight of 249 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled but do not engage.  Bombs are dropped on Gharghur and Qrendi strip, and on Luqa, damaging one Wellington on the ground.  Ack Ack fire: no claims.  One Spitfire of 126 Squadron crashes in a field near Gharghur: the pilot P/O Stevenson is killed.

1836-1936 hrs; 2101-2124 hrs; 2227-2258 hrs; 2347-0027 hrs; 0144-0312 hrs; 0350-0450 hrs  Air raid alerts for a total of 12 enemy bombers of which 9 cross the coast.  Anti-personnel bombs and incendiaries are dropped on Qawra Point, Birkirkara, Hamrun, the Dockyard and Floriana, and in the sea.  Two civilians are killed and three injured in Fleur de Lys.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.  HQ Company and billets of 2nd Bn Royal West Kent Regiment are sprayed with anti-personnel bombs.  Three Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrols. One Beaufighter sights an enemy aircraft which takes evasive action and escapes.  One Beaufighter on patrol over Sicily attacks and damages a JU 88 over Gerbini.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer James Stevenson, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron, RAF.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Anthony Camilleri, age 40; Carmela Gatt, age 45; Paul Parlar, age 62; Doris Spiteri, age 8; Maria Carmela Spiteri, age 6; George Zammit, age 8.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 18 OCTOBER 1942

P 211 HMS Safari

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P 211 to sea.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar; one Liberator from LG 224.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged in combat crash-landed: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire crashed: pilot killed.

LUQA  69 Squadron  One Spitfire was despatched on a search for enemy shipping from Messina to Cape Rizzuto.  One Baltimore was despatched to search for enemy shipping off the Greek coast.  One Spitfire was despatched on search for enemy shipping Cape Spartevento to Cape Rizzo.  One Spitfire was despatched on photo-reconnaissance of Sicilian harbours and aerodromes.

10th HEAVY ACKACK REGIMENT, ROYAL ARTILLERY  2/Lt W J Healy was wounded in action at XHE 25.

10th Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  D Company takes over guard duties of Wardia crossroads.

19 October 1942: Booby-Trapped Cluster Bombs on Malta

Butterfly bomb

A Sapper of Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal narrowly escaped being blown up today when he encountered a new type of anti-personnel bomb.  The Bomb Disposal Section was called out to deal with a number of unexploded German 2kg ‘butterfly’ bombs which have become all too familiar across the Island since June.  The Sapper was following normal procedure to check whether or not the bomb was armed when he noted the fuze number which was 67, instead of the normal 41.  Instead of going ahead and dealing with the bomb, he withdrew and reported the different fuze number to his Sergeant.

The action would save his life and those of his squad.  The Type 67 is a delayed-action fuze: it can be set to blow the bomb at any time from five to thirty minutes after it falls.  The bomb can kill up to 25 metres away and injure anyone within 150 metres.  Although in this case the maximum time had passed, like any clockwork mechanism, if this one had merely jammed any movement could restart the clock – and then there is no way of knowing how long it has left to run.

From now on, butterfly bombs can no longer be considered relatively harmless if left undisturbed.  Any number of them might explode at random, triggering others within range.  The public has been told about the new hazard and warned to stay well clear of any suspect objects.  With at least thirty reports of unexploded butterfly bombs today alone across civilian and military areas, the RE Bomb Disposal Section is now facing the more complex job of clearing hundreds of potential time bombs.

Adapted from UXB Malta, S A M Hudson, History Press 2010/2012

AXIS CONVOY CANNOT ESCAPE MALTA-BASED ATTACKS

The convoy intended for attack by Swordfish and Albacore aircraft last night was again located and photographed this morning by a reconnaissance Spitfire from Malta, 35 miles north west of Lampedusa.

Despite very bad weather, two Swordfish and two Albacores were despatched tonight to attempt another attack.  At 2210 hours they located two merchant vessels and five destroyers which had now reached 53 miles south of Lampedusa.  One Swordfish dropped flares allowing the others to launch three torpedoes.  At least one scored a hit on a merchant vessel, producing a flash and a thick cloud of smoke which obscured the results of the other three missiles.

An hour later four Wellingtons found two merchant vessels and three destroyers some 50 miles south of Lampion and attacked with bombs and torpedoes.  At least one 1000 lb bomb scored a hit on a merchantman.  Then at 0328 hours two Swordfish and two Albacores located the tanker and three destroyers, 80 miles north west of Tripoli.  Of two torpedoes fired at the convoy, one was seen to hit the tanker, producing a large green flash.

During the night three more sorties were made by Wellingtons, one dropping two 1000 lb bombs near the merchant ship which had been attacked by Swordfish hours before and was now stationary.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 19 OCTOBER TO DAWN 20 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Frequent showers throughout the day, heavy at times during the morning.  Lightning very early.

0622-0730 hrs  One Hurricane Hal Far on a search: nothing seen.

0623-0652 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 plus ME 109 fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: F/Sgt Scott damages one ME 109.  The remaining fighter bombers cross the coast.  Two ME 109s dive on Hal Far airfield and drop bombs damaging two Hurricane aircraft on the ground.  The runway remains serviceable but 160 gallons of petrol are burned out in a pen.  Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0726-0807 hrs  Air raid alert for 25 enemy fighters which cross the coast on a high sweep.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds: no claims.  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and see six ME 109s to the south of the Island: the enemy evade combat and flee back to base.

0825-1010 hrs  One Hurricane Hal Far searches for a missing pilot, five miles east of Zonqor, north of Grand Harbour and over St Paul’s Bay 20 miles: nothing seen.

0957-1018 hrs  Air raid alert.  40 plus Italian fighters and ME 109 fighter bombers are reported heading for Malta.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and seven 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Walton probably destroys one Re 2001.  Eight Spitfires are also scrambled from Hal Far but do not engage.  The raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on the Gharghur area and on Salina Bay between the Salt Pans and Salina Battery.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1031-1044 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy fighters cross the coast at great height, apparently on reconnaissance.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1200-1217 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 plus enemy fighters including fighter bombers.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and attempt to engage four ME 109 fighter bombers: no claims.  Fighter bombers cross the coast and drop bombs on Ta Qali.

1322-1342 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 enemy fighters including fighter bombers which come in and drop bombs on Attard.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are airborne and engage the raiders: Capt Kuhlmann and Sgt Gunstone each damage one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands: pilot unhurt.

1457-1527 hrs  Air raid alert for 40 enemy fighters including several fighter bombers heading for the Island.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa, plus four of 229 Squadron and seven of 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept but the enemy turn away into cloud cover and evade engagement.  Several raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Mosta.

1653-1742 hrs  Air raid alert for 40 enemy fighters including ME 109 fighter bombers which drop bombs on the Luqa area and near Mqabba.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far plus four Spitfires 229 Squadron and three of 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept: the enemy is sighted on several occasions but make use of clouds to evade engagement.

1759-1852 hrs  Air raid alert for an attempted dusk raid by 40 enemy bombers and fighter-bombers which approach the Island in two formations.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa with three Spitfires are scrambled to intercept.  One formation is engaged 25 miles west of the Island by three Malta aircraft which force the bombers to jettison their bombs in the sea.  The same three fighters then intercept the other formation to the east of the Island forcing several to jettison bombs.  Only three bombers cross the coast: one JU 88 is pursued by F/Lt Pring of 89 Squadron and destroyed.  Bombs are dropped on Luqa and Hal Far aerodromes; delayed action bombs high explosive bombs land near Bir Miftuh Church.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

2115 hrs  There is an unconfirmed RDF report of a vessel 063 degrees 13 miles from Fort St Elmo, moving 30 at knots from west to east.

0225-0235 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy aircraft approaches to within 20 miles north of the Island and drops flares and bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 19 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept in P 35 and P 247.

Coast at Madliena

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Beauforts, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson, one Liberator to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action crash-landed: pilot uninjured.

LUQA  2114-0134 hrs  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron airborne to attack an enemy southbound convoy: one hit with a 1000 lb claimed.  0105-1513 hrs  Five Wellingtons 69 Squadron airborne to attack the same convoy: no hits observed.  One Spitfire and two Baltimors 69 Squadron despatched during the day on reconnaissance.

10th Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  D Company take over guard duties of Qawra Point and Madliena.

20 October 1942: Maltese ‘Spirit of Resistance’ Recognised

From:  Governor (Gen Viscount Gort)                   To:  Secretary of State for the Colonies

During the month ended 20th October, total of 134 alerts, 90 by day, 44 by night.  61 bombing raids, 38 by day, 23 by night.  64 people were killed (28 men, 18 women, 18 children), 63 were seriously injured (19 men, 25 women, 19 children).  128 houses were seriously damaged including (repeat including) 48 in Gozo.

Recent recrudescence of enemy air attacks has if anything tended to raise morale by taking people’s minds off continued privations in the shape of shortage of food and other commodities.  From the outset of the new phase of attacks, it has been clear that the spirit of resistance has not fallen during the lull of the previous few months.

NEWS CORRESPONDENT PRAISES ISLANDERS’ RESILIENCE

A news correspondent in Malta said today that the Islanders are becoming used to the almost continuous roar of planes and detonations of anti-aircraft guns. “The people come out into the streets at night, watch the search lights pick out planes, and urge anti-aircraft gunners to quicken their rate of fire.”

An advertisement appeared in The Times of Malta today inviting applications for vacancies on the staff of a school on the Island – one for classics and the other for mathematics and science.

MALTA TROOPS PRACTISE SEABORNE LANDINGS

The General Officer Commanding Troops in Malta attended an exercise today held by 2nd Bn Devonshire Regiment.  The Battalion were demonstrating the results of recent training, particularly practice landings from motor launches.  The GOC also watched an exercise by 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regiment practising assault course techniques.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 OCTOBER TO DAWN 21 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Frequent showers throughout the day.  Thunder and lightning very late evening.

0640-0711 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 enemy aircraft including fighters and fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Six Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept but sight nothing.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are airborne on patrol at 21000 feet east of the Island but do not locate the enemy.  The raiders take advantage of 100 per cent cloud cover at 7-8000 feet to cross the coast and drop four bombs on Ta Qali aerodrome.  The airfield’s anti-aircraft gunners open fire, damaging one ME 109.

Wardija

0700 hrs  Two ME 109s machine-gun St Paul’s Bay.  Wardia Observation Post reports seeing a ME 109 attack and machine-gun a Gozo boat.

0910-0950 hrs  One Spitfire 249 Squadron is airborne to act as escort to a submarine: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1106-1150 hrs  Air raid alert for 25 enemy fighters which approach the Island in small groups, taking advantage of cloud cover.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: no engagement.  ME 109 fighter bombers drop four bombs on the Safi end of Luqa runway, causing craters, and near St Nicola Church.  One Spitfire 1435 Squadron is damaged in combat: pilot unhurt.

1415-1426 hrs  Air raid alert as a small number of raiders approach to within 18 miles of the Island and then recede.  Four Spitfires Hal Far are airborne on patrol to the west of the Island and Grand Harbour as cover to incoming aircraft: no engagement.

1700-1805 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties   Gunner Paul Busuttil, 2nd Heavy Ack Ack Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery; Private Vincent Casha, Malta Pioneer Group, Malta Territorial Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 20 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 42 swept in by Speedy, having been met and escorted by two Motor Launches. P 42 claimed hits on two merchant vessels in convoy: her batteries were damaged by an accurate depth charge attack.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two BEauforts, one Liberator, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  one Hudson to Gibraltar; one Beaufort to Shallufa; two Beauforts to LG 224.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron despatched on a search near Lampedusa for enemy shipping attacked last night.  One Baltimore 69 Squadron sent on photographic reconnaissance Cotrone Harbour.

21 October 1942: Malta Blitz Fails To Stop Sinking of Axis Supplies

Submarines of the Malta flotilla has sunk three enemy merchant vessels in recent days and damaged several others.  The submarine successes follow a week in which the Island’s air forces have launched eleven attacks on enemy convoys attempting to supply Axis troops in North Africa.

It is clear that despite his renewed heavy bombardment of the Island Kesselring has failed to stop its forces interrupting enemy supply lines.  Combined attacks from Allied aircraft and submarines based on both sides of the Mediterranean have halted fuel tankers, caused merchant ships to turn back and sent tons of supplies crucial to Rommel’s war effort to the bottom of the sea.

Ack Ack at Work

ARTILLERY ORDERED: HOLD FIRE TO SAVE AMMO

Gun positions are still restricted to 15 rounds per gun despite the recent increased enemy activity.  Artillery commanders have ordered every gun position to reserve fire for good targets.  At the same time they urge positions which get a good target to ‘engage it hotly’.

QUESTIONS IN PARLIAMENT

Mr William Thorne (MP for West Ham Plaistow) today asked the Secretary of State for Air in the House of Commons how many times Malta had been raided; how many people have been killed, the amount of property damaged and the number of aeroplanes brought down since the declaration of war.  Sir Archibald Sinclair replied: “Up to 19th October there have been 1,660 bombing attacks on Malta, and 1,069 enemy aircraft have been destroyed. I understand that, up to 20th September, 1,386 civilians had been killed and 6,704 buildings destroyed or damaged.”

Commander Sir Archibald Southby, MP for Epsom then asked whether in view of what he had said he does not think it necessary in the interests of the people of Malta, to hit Italy from the air.  The Secretary of State answered:  “We have been hitting Italy from the air, and we shall go on hitting Italy.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 21 OCTOBER TO DAWN 22 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  A showery day: thunderstorm and heavy shower early.

0703-0735 hrs  Air raid alert as 15 ME 109s including fighter bombers approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: P/O Walton damages one ME 109.  The remaining raiders use cloud cover to drop bombs on the Safi strip and Gudja.  One high explosive lands in Tal Liebru and four on Xlejli.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0847-0915 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 German and Italian fighters including seven ME 109 fighter bombers heading for Malta.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept but are unable to engage. The raiders cross the coast and drop bombs near Siggiewi and on the Safi runway, damaging one aircraft on the ground and one motor transport vehicle.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0930-1030 hrs  Air raid alert as 25 German and Italian raiders including fighter bombers approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to join the eight of 126 Squadron still airborne from the previous raid.  P/O Walton destroys one Macchi 202.  Bombs are dropped on Luqa and Ta Kandia.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

18 pounder gun

1126 hrs  Air raid alert as 15 enemy aircraft including Re 2001s and ME 109s approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  The raiders launch a dive-bombing attack on Qawra Tower post which returns fire.  Bombs land on the searchlight position and the 18 pounder gun position.

1254-1354 hrs  Air raid alert for 40 plus enemy raiders approaching the Island under cloud cover.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  Bombs are dropped from a great height on Ta Qali.

1530-1605 hrs  Air raid alert: 25 enemy fighters including fighter bombers drop bombs 10-15 miles north of Gozo.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept but see no raiders: none cross the coast.

0435-0515  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach and recede within five miles of Grand Harbour, dropping all bombs in the sea.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is airborne and damages one HE 111 north of the Island.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 21 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept P 247 and P 35 to sea, and escorted P 37 and P 211: the latter reported having sunk one southbound ship east of Pantelleria and P 37 two hits on a southbound merchant vessel.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; two Wellingtons from Shallufa; one Beaufort from Gibraltar. Departures  One Liberator, one Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beauforts to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington overshot runway on landing; undercarriage collapsed: crew uninjured.

LUQA  One Beaufighter 69 Squadron despatched on shipping search near Greek Islands and photographed shipping in Corfu harbour.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron despatched and photographed Navarino and Tripoli.

TA QALI  229 and 249 Squadrons stood down.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During period 15-21 October the Battalion has found two impressed lorries, one motorcycle and five other ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  During the hours of daylight two twin Lewis guns have been manned for anti-aircraft defence of the Safi strip.

22 October 1942: Luftwaffe Crew Captured After 3 Days Adrift

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch

The pilot and crew of a JU 88 bomber were rescued today after three days adrift in a dinghy off the coast of Malta.  The bomber was taking part in a dusk air raid on Monday evening when it was shot down by Flight Lieutenant Pring of 89 Squadron and ditched in the sea.  The crew managed to bail out and get into their dinghy.

Two hours later an enemy search and rescue vessel was spotted searching for the crew but did not find them.  The dinghy was left drifting helplessly until it was spotted today and the RAF Rescue Launch set out in pursuit.  All four crew members survived and were taken prisoner.  They have been named as pilot Oberleutnant Ernst Neuffer, age 27, wireless operator Unteroffizier Fritz Hinterberg (21) and crew members Unteroffizier Hans Ehrentraut (28) and 24 year old Unteroffizier Joseph Stern.

TROOPS BACK TO FULL STRENGTH ON AIRFIELDS                

The number of Army personnel has returned to its former high levels following the recent air raids.  1000 men are now working daily on the aerodromes, repairing pens and filling craters to keep runways open following air attacks.  So far during the recent blitz none of the airfields has been unserviceable for more than a few minutes.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 OCTOBER TO DAWN 23 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fair to fine.

0714-0748 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 enemy fighters including ME 109 fighter bombers heading for Malta.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept but encounter no enemy aircraft.  The raiders cross the coast at great height taking advantage of cloud cover and drop bombs on Hamrun and Birkirkara, damaging property and causing civilian casualties.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0935-1039 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 ME 109s and Macchi 202s including fighter bombers approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: F/Lt McLeod destroys one Macchi 202.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are also scrambled to intercept: F/Lt McElroy and P/O Lowrey destroy one ME 109; P/O Sanderson destroys one Macchi 202; S/Ldr Woods probably destroys one ME 109 and damages one; Sgt Stead damages one ME 109 and one Macchi 202.  The remaining raiders drop bombs on the Ta Qali and Mosta areas.

1120-1220 hrs  Air raid alert for 25 enemy fighters and fighter bombers approaching the Island.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  The raiders cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa, Ta Qali and Hal Far.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and also Light Ack Ack who destroy one ME 109.

1343-1401 hrs  Air raid alert for a formation of enemy fighters approaching the Island.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but see nothing.  The enemy is believed to have turned back.

1512-1619 hrs  Air raid alert for 60 German and Italian fighters escorting fighter bombers towards the Island.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: Sgt Brown and P/O Walton each damage two Macchi 202s.  Eight Spitfires are also scrambled from Hal Far but are unable to gain sufficient height to engage.  Many fighter bombers jettison their bombs in the sea.  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are also airborne but see nothing.  About half of the raiders cross the coast in cloud cover: fighter bombers drop bombs near Luqa and Kirkop.  Heavy Ack Ack engage: no claims.

Military casualties  William Osborne, Foreman of Stokers, HM Dockyard.

Civilian casualties  Hamrun  Carmel Calleja, age 37; Mary Calleja, age 11; Anthony Debono, age 54; Carmela Debono, age 42; Alfred Fenech, age 73; Alfred Muscat, age 4; Jennie Scerri, age 17; Filippa Whiddatt, age 12.  St Julian’s  Carmela Sciberras, age 56.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P 44 in from patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufighter from Gibraltar.  Departures  One DC3 to LG 224; one Wellington to Shallufa.

LUQA  One Baltimore 69 Squadron despatched on shipping search along the Greek coast.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron despatched on photo-reconnaissance of Taranto and Brindisi.  Three special Wellingtons 69 Squadron, one carrying bombs and two carrying torpedoes, despatched to attack an enemy tanker sighted by a photo-reconnaissance Spitfire.  All aircraft returned owing to severe electrical storms which make it impossible to locate or attack the convoy.

23 October 1942: Battle For El Alamein Has Begun

Night offensive begins at El Alamein (c) IWM E18467

At 9.40 this evening a four hour Allied ground and air bombardment began targeting Rommel’s forces at El Alamein.  As the shelling subsided, ground troops and armoured divisions began their advance across Axis minefields.  The offensive follows weeks of attacks on enemy supply convoys, designed to weaken Axis troops and reduce their firepower.

LUFTWAFFE BOMBERS STAYING AWAY

Observers report that no JU 88 bombers or other twin-engined aircraft have approached Malta since Monday.  Enemy air raids are now confined to ‘tip and run’ attacks by heavily escorted fighter bombers.  However, the poor weather since Monday has worked to the raiders’ advantage, giving the agile ‘Jabos’ the advantage of cloud from which to launch attacks and escape.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 23 OCTOBER TO DAWN 24 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Showers.

0630-0736 hrs  Air raid alert as 35 enemy aircraft including ME 109 fighter bombers approach the Island in four quick raids.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: Sgt Saunders destroys one ME 109, F/Lt Charney damages another.  F/O Lindsay’s Spitfire is shot down and he is killed.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled to intercept: no claims.  Bombs are dropped near St Paul’s Bay, and on Mosta and Imtarfa.  Light Ack Ack guns destroy one ME 109.

0830-0910 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 fighters and fighter bombers which fly round the east of the island.  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: Sgt Marshall damages one ME 109.  The raiders then recede.

1010-1038 hrs  Air raid alert.  30 enemy fighters including fighter bombers approach the Island. Three ME 109 fighter bombers drop high explosive bombs on the south east side of the runway at Ta Qali, and on Mosta, damaging property and wounding one civilian.  Eight fighter bombers drop bombs near Zurrieq village and on St Nicola and Kirkop areas.  Malta fighters are airborne and engage, damaging two ME 109s.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1240-1301 hrs  Air raid alert.  15 enemy fighters approach the Island at great height.  While fighters strafe the airfield with machine guns, three ME 109 fighter bombers dive down and drop six high explosive bombs on the Ta Qali dispersal area.  Malta fighters are airborne; no engagements.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1559-1622 hrs  Air raid alert for 30 enemy aircraft approach Malta.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  The raiders do not cross the coast.

2210-2300 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is airborne to intercept reported enemy raiders which turn back 35 miles from Malta: no sighting.

Military casualties  Flight-Lieutenant Alec Lindsay, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Michael Sultana, age 73; Carmelina Grech, age 9.

Enemy casualties  Unteroffizier Heribert Wagner, pilot of a Messerschmitt BF 109 fighter, shot down and killed.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 23 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Una returned from patrol and was swept in by Hythe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons, two Liberators from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed on land while in combat: pilot killed.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron despatched on photo-reconnaissance of Taranto and Brindisi.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron sent to search for enemy shipping along the west coast of Greece.

24 October 1942: Rations To Be Cut Again

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING 24 OCTOBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  The War Office

1.  Enemy now forced to use fighters or fighter bombers only.  RAF have maintained superiority over Island and little damage done.  Air and submarine offensive against enemy convoys maintained.

Raider over Grand Harbour

2.  During daylight. 37 alerts.  Dusk 19 October 40 bombers approached intercepted by six Spitfires.  Three crossed coast rest jettisoned bombs in the sea.  Two JU 88s destroyed.  Remaining alerts each few fighter bombers heavily escorted.  Total 500 Spitfire sorties against 1245 enemy sorties.  Nine fighters destroyed, four probably destroyed, sixteen damaged by RAF.  Four ME 109s destroyed by Lt Ack Ack, two damaged by small arms.  Only three Spitfires destroyed, four damaged.

3.  By night.  Eight alerts.  18 aircraft approach, 13 crossed coast.  Bombs scattered localities.  Beaufighters damaged one JU 88, one HE 111.

4.  Offensive.  Total five Swordfish, five Albacore, eight Wellington sorties against enemy convoys.  Result one Tanker, two merchant vessels hit by torpedoes, one merchant vessel hit by 1000 lb bomb.  Other results unobserved due to bad weather.  Submarines have also been very successful recently.

5.  Admin.  Further economies in motor transport fuel have cut out all mobile training.  Army now existing on less than 4000 gallons petrol per week.  Rations being slightly further reduced on 1st November but calorific value unchanged.  Winter accommodation suffering from lack of petrol and materials.

6.  Military damage negligible; casualties five Other Ranks wounded.

7.  Many unexploded bombs disposed of including 200 anti-personnel and large number of German 1 kg incendiaries.  New type delayed action Butterfly anti-personnel bomb fuze 67 already reported separately.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 OCTOBER TO DAWN 25 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine.

0635-0740 hrs  Air raid alert.  40 enemy aircraft approach the Island in a series of fighter bomber raids.  The bombers dive to attack Ta Qali and Luqa aerodromes, damaging one aircraft on the ground and injuring three airmen.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.  One ME 109 is destroyed by Light Anti Aircraft fire.

1011-1038 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 enemy fighters and fighter bombers approaching at great height.  Four Spitfires from Hal Far and eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: no claims.  The raiders cross the coast at height and drop bombs between Luqa and Grand Harbour, on the Mqabba area and the Safi strip, and on Zurrieq.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1300-1348 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 enemy fighters including a few fighter bombers.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: Black Section are jumped by enemy fighters and one Spitfire is shot down: Sgt Saunders is killed.  The fighter bombers drop bombs on the Ta Qali area.  Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

1521 hrs  Air raid alert.  40 ME 109s and Macchi 202s including a few fighter bombers are intercepted by Malta fighters well to the north of the Island.  Bombs are dropped on the Luqa area, damaging one aircraft on the ground.  One ME 109 and one Macchi 202 are destroyed by fighters and one ME 109 probably destroyed.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands: pilot uninjured.

1615 hrs  Enemy fighter bombers attack the RAF Station at Burmarrad.  Three bombs land nearby: one on soft ground fails to explode.  Another bomb lands near the motor transport drivers’ billet of 2nd Bn King’s Own Malta Regiment, destroying the ablution facility.  Bombs also explode near their defence posts causing slight shock to ten men manning the posts.

1629 hrs  All clear.

2109-2154 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa is airborne on patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Private Philip Kanter, Royal Army Medical Corps, No 90 General Hospital;  Sergeant Raymond Saunders, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 24 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 247 returned and was swept in by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two DC3 from LG 224; two Beauforts from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons, two Liberators to Gibraltar; two Beauforts, one DC3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire shot down by enemy fighters: pilot killed.  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action: pilot injured.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 54.  Dealt with: High Explosives 13 including 3 with unmarked delayed-action fuzes (4 x 250kg, 10 x 50kg); 1 Italian anti-personnel bomb container; 357 anti-personnel bombs; 5 oil incendiaries.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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11-17 October 1942: The Blitz is Back

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11 October 1942:  31 Civilians Killed – 17 in Tarxien

Malta was rocked today by heavy bombing raids for the first time three months, as the enemy sent 58 bombers with massed fighter escorts over the Island.  The attacks mark a return to blitz conditions not seen since the end of April 1942.  This time Malta’s Spitfires were airborne in force to counter-attack, destroying eight of the enemy bombers and seven of their fighters.

Heavy Ack Ack also engaged the raiders but with ammunition restrictions at 15 rounds per gun per day due to lack of stocks the Gunners were unable to provide a deterrent to raiders equal to previous months.  The Army has increased the number of men assisting on the aerodromes to 350 daily, to service aircraft and clear damaged runways to keep Malta’s defenders in the air.

The communique from Allied HQ Cairo states: “There was an increase in air activity over Malta yesterday heavily-escorted bombers carried out five attacks during the day. Our fighters engaged them on every occasion. They destroyed at least 15 enemy aircraft, and a great many more were damaged. We lost one fighter. The Malta air craft is the only Allied plane missing from all these operations.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 OCTOBER TO DAWN 12 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; cloudy about mid-day.

0715 hrs  Air raid alert.  Spitfires of 1435 and 126 Squadrons Luqa are scrambled and intercept nine JU 88s with a large fighter escort approaching Malta from the north. As enemy fighters try to fend them off 126 Squadron attacks and P/O Stevenson destroys one Macchi 202 and F/O Smith destroys one JU 88.  F/S Varey probably destroys one ME 109 and damages one; Sgt Yeatman damages one ME 109, Sgt Marshall one JU 88 and Sgt Tiddy one Macchi 202.  1435 Squadron P/O Walton damages one JU 88 and Sgt Hamilton one ME 109. One Spitfire 1435 Squadron is damaged: pilot unhurt.

Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled to intercept.  As they go in to attack enemy bombers they are jumped by escorting fighters: no results.

0719 hrs   Six JU 88s escorted by 30 fighters approached from the south east of Malta to attack Hal Far by shallow dive.  They drop bombs on Benghaisa PT and Hal Far, damaging GHQ, a coal dump and motor transport.

0725 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a bomber crashed in the sea near to defence post RA 3.

0755 hrs  All clear.

0800-0955  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are dispatched to act as escort for the High Speed Launch: no enemy aircraft approach.

0945 hrs  Six JU 88 bombers escorted by 65 fighters are reported approaching the Island.  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  They locate six bombers with twenty fighters and are instructed to attack top cover from up sun.  F/Lt Roscoe destroys one ME 109; Sgt Miller damages one.

0950 hrs  Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far to intercept and engage enemy aircraft: no claims.

1009 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  1435 Squadron S/L Lovell and P/O Walton each damage one ME 109.

1009-1105 hrs  Air raid alert.  The six JU 88 bombers with their remaining fighter escort cross the coast between 18000 and 3000 feet and drop bombs on Lija, Balzan and Birkirkara on the way to Ta Qali.  The JU 88s attempt to drop 20-30 high explosive bombs on the airfield’s runway but overshoot the target, then split up as they recede.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.

1230 hrs  Eight JU 88s escorted by 50 fighters approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept the raiders and launch a head-on attack on the eight JU 88s escorted by 25 fighters.  W/Cdr Donaldson destroys one JU 88 and damages one ME 109; F/Sgt Ballantyne destroys one ME 109; P/O Nash damages one Macchi 202.

Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled from Hal Far.  They locate one JU 88 with fighter escort and engage: P/O Park damages one RE 2001.

1325 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron are scrambled: one Spitfire 126 Squadron is damaged and crash-lands: the pilot is unhurt.  1435 Squadron F/Lt McLeod and F/Sgt MacLennan each damage two ME 109s; Sgt Williams and Sgt Jarrett each damage one; P/O Park damages one Re 2001.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged in combat: Sgt Jarrett is slightly hurt.

1400 hrs  The eight JU 88s with fighter escort drop bombs on Ta Qali aerodrome and dispersal areas, and on Rabat, causing damage to property and civilian casualties.  Three Spitfires are slightly damaged and one written off.

1420 hrs  Raiders passed.

A formation of 16 enemy raiders is seen to the north of the Islands but are too far away for identification.  As they approach, they are discovered to be single-engined aircraft with retractable undercarriage and are at first thought to be a new type of JU 87.

1625 hrs  40 German and Italian fighters approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and attack enemy fighters north of St Paul’s Bay.  F/Lt Glazebrook and F/Sgt Ballantyne each destroy one Macchi 202.  Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far: W/Cdr Thompson, Sgt Gore and P/O Reid each destroy one ME 109.   Spitfires of 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled: W/Cdr Hanks damages one ME 109 and S/Ldr Wicks one Macchi 202; F/Lt Reels probably destroys one Re 2001 and damages one; F/O Wallace damages one Macchi 202.  One Spitfire is damaged; the pilot is unhurt.  One Spitfire and pilot Sgt MacLean are reported missing.

1630 hrs  Air raid alert.  Bombs are dropped on Mellieha Ridge.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

1700 hrs  4th Bn The Buffs Beat the Retreat in Rabat Square in the presence of His Excellency the Governor.

1720 hrs  Raiders passed.

1735 hrs  Thirty unescorted JU 88s approach the Island.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage 15 JU 88s.  P/O Nash and F/Sgt Ballantyne each destroy one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson and F/Lt Parkinson each probably destroy one.

1745 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: F/Lt McLeod and Sgt MacLennan each destroy two JU 88s and Sgt Kebble one; Sgt Ree damages two JU 88s.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged: the pilots are unhurt.

1800 hrs  The remaining JU 88s drop bombs on Hal Far, Luqa, Tarxien and Qormi, destroying houses and causing civilian casualties. One Beaufighter is burned out the ground on Luqa aerodrome.  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report two planes down in the sea north of defence post RA 3.

In Tarxien, personnel of HQ Company, 2nd Bn Devonshire Regt help to put out fires.  Bombs are dropped in Mqabba and Gudja camp areas.  One Other Rank of 1st Bn Hampshire Regt is injured by an incendiary bomb.  Searchlights effect ten illuminations, in one case illuminating three planes simultaneously.  225 Light Ack Ack Battery engage one JU 88 at 4000 feet.

1810-1820 hrs  1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report anti-personnel bombs between D Company HQ and Ta Ingrau, near Della Grazia and 150 yards south of Fort Ta Silch.  A Company send 40 men to extinguish a fire at Ta Belebel area.  CQMS Rampling, A Company, is injured in the left thigh by a bomb in Tarxien.

1850 hrs  Raiders passed.  The Spitfires landing at Ta Qali have great difficulty due to a cratered runway.

2100-2130 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach but only one crosses the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Bombs are dropped in Birkirkara.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne: no engagements.  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a delayed action bomb exploding near Ta Ingrau.

0039-0100 hrs  One HE 111 flies over Malta and drops flares and delayed action bombs on Luqa runway.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  As the enemy raider heads turns to head for Sicily, a Beaufighter of 89 Squadron intercepts.  F/O Shipard and F/Sgt Oxley attack with bursts of cannon and machine gun fire and destroy the HE 111.

0245-0330 hrs  Six enemy bombers approach the Island.  One crosses the coast and drops anti-personnel bombs on the Luqa, Safi and Ghaxaq areas.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne to intercept but do not locate the raiders.

0400 hrs  Two delayed action bombs are discovered by 1st Bn Hampshire Regt west of Kirkop.

Porte des Bombes

0438-0621 hrs  Nine enemy bombers approach the Island, several crossing the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea north of Spinola, on Porte des Bombes, St Patrick’s and St Andrew’s, and north of St Paul’s Bay.  The Beaufighter 89 Squadron of F/O Shipard and F/Sgt Oxley shoots down one HE 111 in flames.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant David MacLean, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 126 Squadron; Gunner Lawrence Borg, 11th HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery, killed by enemy aircraft at Rabat.

Civilian casualties  Mtarfa  Paul Azzopardi, age 17.  Paola  Joseph Hockey, age 30; Rose Hockey, age 25; Doris Hockey, age 4.  Qormi  Joseph Cardona, age 76.  Rabat  Anthony Caruana, age 10; Angiolina Falzon, age 14; Joseph Fsadni, age 28; Maddalena Galea, age 28; Antonia Grixti, age 46; Peter Vella, age 64; Mary Zahra, age 44.  Tarxien  Concetta Attard, age 47; Joseph Baldacchino, age 36; Anthony Barbara, age 55; Antonia Camilleri, age 76; Maggie Cook, age 56; Joseph Debono, age 25; Lonza Debono, age 25; Joseph Degabriele, age 9; Calcedonio Farrugia, age 15; Emily Gleaves, age 28; Joseph Manicolo, age 44; Laurence Piscopo, age 24; Charles Porter, age 71; Edward Redman, age 64; Charles Salsero, age 3; Vincent Scerri, age 60; Mary Tabone, age 12.  Zebbug  Spiro Borg, age 25.  Zejtun  Carmel Grech, age 30.

Enemy casualties (known)  Unteroffizier Gunther Grams, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber shot down into the sea.  He was rescued ten miles north of Grand Harbour and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 11 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy escorted P 42 to sea for patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Beaufighters from Edcu; three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Liberator to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Three Spitfires damaged in combat crashed on aerodrome: pilots uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged in combat suffered engine failure on landing: pilot uninjured.  Two Spitfires shot down into the sea by enemy fighters: one pilot missing.

TA QALI  249 Squadron are stood down.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Bugles played at Zebbug where the George Cross was on show.

12 October 1942: 700 Raiders Over Malta in 60 Hours

In the 60 hours to 6 o’clock this evening Axis air forces have made 700 sorties against Malta.   However, the enemy onslaught has been at a heavy cost.  In the same period the Island’s Spitfires have destroyed 20 bombers and 22 fighters, probably destroyed 21 enemy aircraft and damaged another 59.  Wing Commander Donaldson is encouraged by the new RAF tactic of ‘forward interception’ – attacking raiders well before they reach Malta:

W/Cdr A H Donaldson

“It was the most spectacular sight I have ever seen.  The whole sky was filled with enemy aircraft in severe trouble!  I saw three flaming Junkers 88s and another three flaming ME 109s, and counted no less than ten parachutes descending slowly, three of them from a Junkers 88 I had shot down.  Two of my victims, a Junkers 88 and a ME 109 both burst into flames.” (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 OCTOBER TO DAWN 13 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mostly fair to cloudy.  Slight shower with lightning in the evening.

0540 hrs  Fifteen enemy bombers are reported approaching the Island in two waves, with an escort of 25 fighters each.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept, followed by eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far at 0550 hrs and three of 229 Squadron Ta Qali at 0555 hrs.

The Spitfires of 229 Squadron attack the first wave of seven JU 88s, forcing one to jettison its bombs in the sea.  F/Lt Glazebrook probably destroys one JU 88 and F/Sgt Ballantyne damages another.  The eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled and intercept five JU 88s and fighter escort.  Capt Kuhlmann probably destroys one ME 109; Sgt Vinall damages one JU 88.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.

0620 hrs  Air raid alert.  The first wave of raiders drops bombs on Ta Qali and Luqa, where aircraft are damaged on the ground.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron and six 126 Squadron Luqa are then scrambled to join the attack.  126 Squadron F/Lt Rolls and F/Sgt Lang each destroy one JU 88; Sgt Park destroys two.  One Spitfire 126 Squadron and pilot S/Ldr Wicks are reported missing.  1435 Squadron Sgt Williams, P/O Stewart and P/O Latimer each damage one JU 88; P/O Owen damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged: the pilots are unhurt.

0630 hrs  The second wave of bombers targets Hal Far, where one Spitfire is burned out and one Spitfire and two Hurricanes slightly damaged.  The eight Spitfires 249 Squadron engage seven JU 88s and their fighter escort, chasing them home.  Sgt/ Stead and S/Ldr Stephens destroy two ME 109s; S/Ldr Woods destroys one and probably destroys a JU 88 over the south Sicilian coast.  One Spitfire crashes into the sea: pilot escapes unhurt and awaits rescue.

0705-0850 hrs  Four Spitfires from Hal Far carry out a search but find nothing.  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron patrol locate the pilot in the sea and patrol above until he is picked up.

0738 hrs  All clear.

0814-0900 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS carry out a search for missing pilots.

0840 hrs  18 bombers approach the Island in two waves, accompanied by 25 fighters.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and intercept, causing five bombers to jettison their bombs in the sea and turn back.  W/Cdr Donaldson and P/O Reynolds destroys one JU 88; P/O Nash damages two and F/Lt Glazebrook damages one.  P/O Parkinson damages one BR 20 and F/Sgt Ballantyne probably destroys one Macchi 202.

0845 hrs  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and engage twelve enemy bombers with fighter escort.  F/O McElroy destroys one ME 109; F/Sgt Hiskens and F/Sgt De Lara probably destroy one JU 88.  Other Spitfires close in on six enemy fighters: F/L McEiroy turns towards the ME 109s and destroys one F/Sgt Hiskens probably destroys; F/O McElroy, P/O Sanderson and Sgt Stead damage one each before the Messerschmitts break off the fight.

0907 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight 1435 Squadron are scrambled and engage.  Sgt Park and F/O Wallace 126 Squadron each destroy one JU 88; F/Lt Rolls destroys one Macchi 202 and probably destroys another; F/Sgt Bush and P/O Bazalgette each damage one JU 88.  1435 Squadron Sgt Mclennan destroys one ME 109.  One Spitfire crashes but the pilot is unhurt.  Heavy Ack Ack also engage.

0910 hrs  Bombs are dropped on Luqa, damaging aircraft on the ground, and at Ta Qali.  Bombs and incendiaries also fall at Bir-id-Dehen, Zeitun and Safi.  Anti-personnel bombs are dropped in the Latnia-Ta Ingrau area.  Four JU 88s drop high explosive bombs near Bir Miftuh Church.

Bir Miftuh Chapel

0950 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled and intercept five JU 88s with fighter escort as they turn away from bombing Ta Qali.  W/Cdr Thompson and P/O Reid each damage one ME 109.  Sgt Vinall fails to return.

1021 hrs  Raiders passed.

1105-1155 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS search for missing pilots.

1110-1225 hrs  One Spitfire from Hal Far searches for Sgt Vinall without success.  Sgt Vinall’s body is later discovered at the shoreline, on the west coast of the Island.

1130-1230 hrs  Eight JU 88s with an escort of 30 fighters are reported heading southwards from Sicily.  Malta’s Spitfires are scrambled early, intercepting the raiders a few miles south of the Sicilian coast and 35 miles from Malta.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack the JU 88s and fighters head-on.  W/Cdr Donaldson, F/O McElroy and F/Sgt Heskens each destroy one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson and S/Ldr Woods each destroy one ME 109.  One JU 88 is probably destroyed and four damaged; two ME 109s are damaged.  Three Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.  229 Squadron F/Lt Roscoe probably destroys one Macchi 202 and another is damaged; S/Ldr H C Baker damages one ME 109.

1205 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to follow up with an on the remaining JU 88s and fighters.  F/Lt Mcleod destroys one ME 109; Sgt McLennan and Sgt Rae each damage one.  In all, three Spitfires are damaged in combat and another is reported missing.

1315-1445 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS carry out a search for the missing pilot.  His dinghy is located and the High Speed Launch picks him up.

1430 hrs  45 enemy fighters are reported flying southwards from Sicily at a great height.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are airborne but see nothing.

1446-1510 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  W/Cdr Hanks destroys two ME 109s.

1535-1630 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1640 hrs  57 enemy aircraft including at least six JU 88s are reported heading southwards from Sicily.   Eight Spitfires 1535 Squadron and three 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage the raiders 30-40 miles north of Malta.  1435 Squadron S/Ldr Lovell destroys one JU 88; F/Sgt Scott destroys one Re 2001.  P/O Walten, F/Sgt Scott and Sgt Hawkins probably destroy one JU 88 each.  F/Sgt Scott also damages one Re 2001.  One Spitfire is shot down: pilot F/Sgt Stevenson is missing.

1652 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are airborne: no interceptions.

1715 hrs  Only a few enemy aircraft reach the Island at failing light.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron chase three unidentified enemy aircraft but are unable to engage.  The bombers appear to approach singly, dropping bombs on Sliema, Ghaxaq, Safi, Nigret, Latnia and Marsamxetto. Bombs are also scattered near Luqa and Kalafrana.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1820 hrs  Anti-personnel, incendiary and high explosive bombs are dropped near the Safi strip (between Tal Liebru and St Nicola Church), Ta Karach and Misrah Blandun.

1847 hrs  All clear.

1945-2011 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five enemy bombers approach Malta at 17-20000 feet; two cross the coast and drop bombs in the sea north of Grand Harbour and St Paul’s Bay.  Malta Beaufighter is airborne: no engagement.

2100 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a white flashing light out to sea 6-8 miles bearing 65 degrees Fort Ta Silch.  The vessel is later confirmed as the RAF Rescue Launch.

2120-2205 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy bombers approach at 27000 feet.  Three cross the coast and drop bombs at Benghaisa PT and in the sea north east of the Island.  Malta fighters are airborne: one attacks and destroys a HE 111 which jettisons its bombs during the engagement.

2120-2205 hrs  Four enemy bombers approach Malta.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept; F/O Shipard destroys one enemy bomber.

2220-2320 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron on patrol over Sicily attacks and shoots down an enemy bomber as it is about to land.

0245-0315 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach the Island at heights of up to 15000 feet but none cross the coast.  Flares are dropped off Madliena.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

0430-0500 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five enemy aircraft approach the Island: one crosses the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the Kalafrana area and in the sea east of Leonardo PT.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

Military casualties  Sergeant John Vinall, Pilot, Royal Air Force, 185 Squadron; Squadron Leader Bryan Wicks, Royal Air Force, 126 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties (known)  Unteroffizier Otto Kobszinowski, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner; Unteroffizier Max Zettelmaier, Crewman of a JU 88 bomber picked up from the sea and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 12 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy escorted Una to sea for patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Beaufighter to Edcu.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfire shot down into the sea: both pilots bailed out and rescued uninjured.  One Spitfire shot down by enemy fighters: pilot baled out and landed uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action: pilot uninjured.  Two Spitfires failed to return to base after enemy action: pilots missing.  One Beaufighter taxied into a bomb crater: crew uninjured.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  A detailed bomb search was carried out and discovered 23 unexploded anti-personnel bombs and two unexploded HE bombs.

13 October 1942: 1000 Axis Aircraft Destroyed Over Malta

Wreckage of JU 88

Today Malta claimed the 1000th enemy aircraft destroyed since Italy entered the war in June 1940.  The milestone was reached during the heaviest air raid on the Island since 10 May.  “We wonder can the Axis keep it up.”  (CO, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment).

Air raids are becoming more ‘systematic’ – with one before breakfast, one during the morning, then at lunchtime, mid-afternoon, just after tea and sometimes at dusk.  Attacking forces generally comprise six or seven JU 88 bombers with large fighter escorts raid the aerodromes in turn.  JU 88 bombers now appear to be adopting shallow dive tactics in an attempt to launch bombs on target.

MALTA WELLINGTONS ON THE ATTACK

A Baltimore on an afternoon shipping reconnaissance in the South Ionian Sea sighted two 6-7000 ton merchant vessels and six destroyers, proceeding south at 12 knots.  Three Wellingtons were despatched to attack but only one found the convoy, about half way between southern Greece and Benghazi.  Two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but fell wide of the target.

Two Beaufighters also carried out intruder sorties over Sicily today as Malta continues its role as a fortress against Axis operations in the Mediterranean.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 13 OCTOBER TO DAWN 14 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; slight shower with lightning early morning.

0610 hrs  As seven JU 88s escorted by 30 ME 109s approach the Island eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They engage three JU 88s with a large fighter escort.  F/Lt Charney probably destroys one ME 109; Major Swales and P/O Maynard each damage a ME 109; P/O Maynard and F/Sgt Maher each damage a JU 88.

0620 hrs  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and dive to attack five remaining JU 88s and fighter escort.  P/O Beurling destroys one JU 88 and one ME 109; P/O Seed probably destroys one JU 88.  P/O Seed, P/O Giddings, F/Lt Hetherington and Sgt Shenell each damage one ME 109.

0705-0729 hrs  Air raid alert.  The remaining raiders cross the coast: bombs are dropped in the Luqa area, killing two civilians.  Two JU 88s drop bombs in the area of Bir Miftuh Church.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Walten destroys one JU 88; P/O Pinney probably destroys one ME 109 and damages one JU 88.

0935-1035 hrs  Six JU 88s and 42 fighter approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and intercept the raiders about 10 miles north of Zonqor.  They launch a diving attack on one JU 88: no claims.

1007 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight of 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept. 1435 Squadron Sgt Hawkins destroys one JU 88; F/Sgt Scott destroys one ME 109 and damages one JU 88.  Sgt Sharp damages another JU 88 and Sgt Eva damages a ME 109.  126 Squadron WO Farquharson probably destroys one ME 109; W/Cdr Hanks damages one JU 88 and P/O Thompson damages a JU 88.  One Spitfire is damaged: the pilot is unhurt.

1030 hrs  JU 88s drop bombs on Safi and Hal Far, Kirkop and Ta Klantun, Ta Liebru and near Zurrieq.

1037 hrs  Raiders passed.

1123-1140 hrs  Air raid alert.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled on to intercept but see nothing.  The raiders do not approach Malta.

1235-1334 hrs  Six JU 88s with a heavy escort of 44 fighters are reported heading for Malta.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and intercept the raiders 25 miles north of Zonqor: Major Swales probably destroys a JU 88; Sgt McLeod is reported missing.

1245 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and engage the remaining JU 88s with escorting fighters over Kalafrana Bay.  S/Ldr Baker and F/Sgt Bye each damage one ME 109; Sgt Miller damages one JU 88.

1310 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled and engage raiders.  F/Lt Jones destroys one ME 109; F/O smith destroys one Macchi 202.  F/Sgt Carey probably destroys one JU 88 and W/O Farquharson one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1315 hrs  Two JU 88s drop bombs on Zurrieq village.

1330 hrs  High explosive and incendiary bombs are dropped near Luqa, on Wied Babu and Nigret.  Private Fenech of 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment is affected by blast; Private Teuma is injured by a bomb splinter in the elbow.

1335 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report one ME 109 shot down into the sea one mile off Grand Harbour.

1344 hrs  Raiders passed.

1550 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron and eight of 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 30 enemy fighters and bombers approaching Malta.

1611 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.   Sgt [White]destroys one JU 88 and F/Lt McLeod destroys one Macchi 202.

1630 hrs  Seven JU 88s cross the coast at Kalafrana heading for Qrendi where they drop into a steep dive to bomb Qrendi air strip.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs land on Qrendi village, near Tal Providenza and on Qrendi strip.  One just misses a defence post, wounding one member of 4th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment.  One high explosive bomb lands near Hagiar Qim battery of 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

The Spitfires of 229 and 249 Squadrons then launch an attack on the fighters and bombers and a general dogfight ensues.  229 Squadron P/O Nash destroys one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson damages another.  His and one other Spitfire are damaged in combat and crash land at Ta Qali: neither pilot is hurt.  Total enemy casualties are two JU 88s, two ME 109s, three Macchi 202s and one Re 2001 destroyed; three JU 88s damaged.

1652 hrs  Raiders passed.

1810-1905 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to locate and intercept enemy raiders but are unable to get within range: visibility is poor due to failing light.  The raid does not materialize.

2212-0013 hrs  Air raid alert.  Ten enemy aircraft approach the Island but only four cross the coast.  Bombs are dropped on the edge of Hal Far runway; the aerodrome remains serviceable.  Incendiaries are dropped on Zebbug and Mellieha, and on Wardia Ridge.  Observers identify one enemy aircraft in the searchlights as a Focke-Wolfe Zenstorer.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no engagement.

0218-0258 hrs  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept enemy raiders: no engagement.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Alexander MacLeod, Royal Canadian Air Force, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Emanual Mifsud, age 20.  Sliema  John Block, age 20.

Enemy casualties (known)  Sottotenente Maurizio Iannucci, 352a Squadriglia, 20o Gruppo, 51o Stormo, pilot of a Macchi 202 fighter, shot down and killed; Captain Enzo Radini, pilot of Macchi 202 fighter aircraft, picked up from the sea by RAF Launch.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 13 OCTOBER 1942

P34 HMS Ultimatum

ROYAL NAVY  P 34 was swept in by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed into the sea during combat with enemy fighters: pilot missing.  One Spitfire force-landed: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action: pilot uninjured.  One Beaufighter’s hydraulic system failed on landing: crew uninjured.

ROYAL ARTILLERY  Gunner Davies 6/4 Regt was wounded in action at XHB 10 Heavy Ack Ack position.

 14 October 1942: Screwball Beurling’s Last Mission

82 enemy aircraft have been destroyed over Malta between 10 and 14 October 1942.  “Still they come asking for more, and they get it.”  CO, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment

MALTA SPITFIRE ACES SHOT DOWN

George Beurling

Record-breaking fighter pilot George Beurling was lucky to escape alive today when his Spitfire was strafed by enemy cannon shells, causing him serious injuries.  Pilot Officer Beurling, also known as ‘Screwball’ was flying one of seven Spitfires of 249 Squadron scrambled at 1300 hours today to attack nine JU 88 bombers with and a large close escort of German and Italian fighters just south of Zonqor Point.

Having downed one JU 88, Beurling spotted a fellow Spitfire under fire from a band of Messerschmitts and attacked, downing the leading fighter.  Another JU 88 bomber returned fire, wounding Beurling in the arm and hand.  He broke off and climbed, before turning to pursue another ME 109 on the tail of a Spitfire.  Beurling’s fire shot off the wing of the Messerschmitt and it spiralled downwards as he watched.  The moment’s distraction was nearly fatal: cannon shells from another ME 109 ripped into his Spitfire from below, badly injuring his heel, elbow and ribs and setting the aircraft on fire.

Beurling managed to bail out and parachuted down towards the sea.  The ME 109 fired again at the pilot and his ‘chute but was chased away by another Spitfire.  Beurling was rescued later from the sea by the High Speed Launch and taken to hospital.  His injuries bring to an end his run of 29 enemy aircraft destroyed over Malta between July and October 1942.

Wing Commander Arthur Donaldson DSO was also injured earlier today in combat with enemy raiders.  W/Cdr Donaldson was piloting one of four Spitfires in an air battle with eight JU 88s and their fighter escort.  He flew straight through the fighter cordon to launch a head-on attack on the enemy bombers.  The raiders returned fire, injuring Donaldson in the head and foot.   Two of his fingers were shot away and he had to withdraw.  For the second time in two days, and despite serious injuries, he managed to land his damaged Spitfire safely at Ta Qali before being taken to hospital.

Adrian Warburton

AIRCRAFT LOST IN CONVOY RAID – RECONNAISSANCE PILOT WARBURTON HELPS ENEMY DESTROYER RESCUE SURVIVORS

A reconnaissance Spitfire from Malta today spotted a convoy including a 2000 ton merchant vessel escorted by a destroyer, off the Tripolitanian coast and heading east.  Three Beaufighters of 227 Squadron Luqa were despatched immediately to attack.

At 1130 hrs today they located the convoy and all three Beaufighters went in to attack at mast height.  One was shot down before it reached target.  The other hit the ship’s mast causing the plane to crash into the sea and killing the pilot, Flying Officer Peter Underwood and navigator Flight Sergeant Ivor Miller. The third Beaufighter dropped two 300 lb bombs and fired with cannon and machine gun but no results were seen.

Reconnaissance pilot Squadron Leader Adrian Warburton was still on the scene and spotted the dinghy of the aircraft of P/O Brice and Sgt Cole.  Despite being fired on by Italian fighters, he persevered in making contact with the enemy destroyer, to guide the ship to the location of the Beaufighter’s dinghy.  S/Ldr Warburton reported seeing the survivors picked up by the destroyer before he returned to base.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 14 OCTOBER TO DAWN 15 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fair early morning; otherwise fine.  Very good visibility morning and afternoon.

0535-0640 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

0645 hrs  Eight JU 88s with fighter escort are reported approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  W/Cdr Thompson, P/O Reid and P/O O’Brien each damage a ME 109.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are also scrambled and attack 20 German and Italian fighters head-on, north of St Paul’s Bay.  .  W/Cdr Donaldson damages one JU 88 before his Spitfire is forced to crash-land at Ta Qali; he is injured and admitted to hospital.

0707 hrs  Nine Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and attack just north of Grand Harbour.  F/Lt Rolls destroys one JU 88; Sgt Park and F/O Wallace each destroy one ME 109.  Sgt Park also probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Hending and F/Sgt Bush each damage one.  One Spitfire is lost and two damaged: pilots are unhurt.

0727 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight JU 88s with an escort of forty fighters approach the Island, the majority crossing the coast.  Bombs are dropped on Ta Qali rendering the aerodrome temporarily unserviceable.  There are two civilian casualties.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack six JU 88s as bombs are dropping on Ta Qali.  S/Ldr Woods and F/Sgt De Lara each damage one JU 88.

0741 hrs  Raiders passed.

0940 hrs  60 enemy aircraft including at least eight JU 88 bombers approach the Island in tight formation, with 20 ME 109s flying above as top cover.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and intercept the raiders 20 miles north of Grand Harbour, attacking six JU 88s from astern and head-on.  Sgt Brough destroys one JU 88; Sgt Francis probably destroys one ME 109.  Sgt Lundy damages two JU 88s; F/Lt Glazebrook and P/O Nash each damage one.  One Spitfire is missing: P/O Nash is slightly injured in the face and is picked up by the Rescue Launch.

1026-1056 hrs  Air raid alert.  The remainder head for Hal Far.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and attack the raiders while they are diving to bomb the airfield.  W/Cdr Thompson destroys a JU 88; P/O Reid and Capt Kuhlmann each destroy a ME 109.  P/O Cheek probably destroys a JU 88 and damages another.  P/O Reid damages a JU 88; Sgt Tarbuck damages a JU 88 and a ME 109, and Capt Kuhlmann damages a ME 109.    Bombs are dropped on Hal Far and Safi, Wied Has Saptan, Ta Klantun and Ta Liebru, and anti-personnel bombs on Kirkop.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  As the enemy turn away they are attacked again, north west of Kalafrana.

Total enemy casualties three JU 88s and two ME 109s destroyed; one JU 88 and one ME 109 probably destroyed; six JU 88s and three ME 109s damaged.

1300 hrs  Nine JU 88s approach the Island, closely escorted by fighters.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Beurling destroys two ME 109s and one JU 88.  P/O Giddings destroys one ME 109.  F/Lt Hetherington probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Wynn probably destroys one ME 109.  P/O Giddings and Sgt Bryden each damage a JU 88 and P/O Williams damages two ME 109s.

1305 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Parkinson destroys one Macchi 202; S/Ldr Stephens destroys one Re 2001 and damages on JU 88.  Two Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.

1310 hrs  Air raid alert.

1330 hrs  Seven JU 88s raid Hal Far, dropping high explosives and incendiaries on the aerodrome, causing craters.  Anti-personnel bombs are scattered over Regimental HQ and 14th Battery HQ of 4th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment.  Enemy raiders make skillful use of cloud cover during the raid.

1355 hrs  Raiders passed.

1510-1535 hrs  Air raid alert.  35 aircraft including 7 JU 88s approach the Island and are intercepted 15 miles north east of Zonqor.  Four ME 109s and one Re 2001 are destroyed; one JU 88 is probably destroyed; three JU 88s and two ME 109s damaged.

The remainder of the attackers head for Hal Far and are engaged over Kalafrana by eight Spitfires from Hal Far.  F/Sgt Maher destroys a JU 88 and Sgt Guy probably destroys a ME 109 and damages a JU 88.  Bombs are dropped on Hal Far aerodrome causing craters but no major damage.  Heavy Ack Ack fires.

1636 hrs  Air raid alert for ten JU 88s escorted by 40 fighters evidently turning in to head for Ta Qali.  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and intercept the raiders to the east of Grand Harbour before they can cross the coast.  They attack the bombers head-on, forcing them to turn out to sea and away from their target.  Most of their bombers jettison their load into the sea.  Sgt Miller destroys one JU 88 and damages one; S/Ldr M M Stephens and P/O Johnson each damage one JU 88.  A few bombs are dropped in the Mosta area.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and share in the destruction of one JU 88.

1710 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report three bombers and a fighter (believed to be a Spitfire) in the sea off Grand Harbour.

1715 hrs  Raiders passed.

2100-2110 hrs  Air raid alert.  10 enemy bombers approach Malta: all but one turn back before crossing the coast, dropping their bombs in the sea all round the north coast of the Island.  Some high explosives and incendiaries are dropped between Bugibba and Salina, and across to Mosta.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

2145 hrs  Five enemy fighter bombers launch a dive-bombing attack on the RAF station at Qawra Tower and Headquarters of C Company, 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

2200 hrs  A Company, 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report bombs in the Latnia area.  E Company report bombs in the area of St Mary’s Battery.

0205-0435 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight enemy bombers approach the Island but only two cross the coast, dropping bombs on Ta Qali, Ghain Tuffieha and Hamrun.  Malta Beauffighters are airborne and one sees a HE 111 approaching at 12000 feet.  The fighter dives from 15000 feet to attack, lowering his undercarriage to avoid overshooting.  He fires at the enemy raider from astern, causing it to explode and crash into the sea.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Ivor Miller, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 227 Squadron; Sergeant Ronald Roe, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 1435 Squadron; Squadron Leader Peter Underwood, RAF VR, 227 Squadron; Flight Sergeant William Williams, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Francis Fenech, age 18.  Msida  Anthony Zahra, age 11.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 14 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept P 211 in from sea; the latter reported having driven a 900 ton steamer ashore by gunfire and subsequently destroyed it by torpedo. She also reported two other merchant vessels successfully attacked with torpedoes.  Fleet Air Arm obtained one hit on a 7000 merchant vessel which was subsequently beached at Homs.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Liberator from LG 224; one Beaufighter from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Beauforts to Shallufa.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires shot down by enemy fighters: pilots missing.  One Beaufighter damaged by enemy action crash-landed: crew uninjured.

Four Spitfires damaged in enemy action: one pilot injured.  Three Spitfires shot down by enemy action into sea: pilots rescued, two uninjured, one slightly injured. Two Beaufighters damaged by enemy action while on shipping strike, crashed into the sea: crews missing.

HAL FAR  1925-0032 hrs  Two Albacores and one Swordfish of the RNAS were despatched to attack 7000 ton merchant vessel escorted by two destroyers off the coast of Tripoli.  One torpedo hit the merchantman amidships, which was later observed to be stationary.

LUQA  One Wellington 69 Squadron attacked an enemy convoy south east of Malta.  Two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but no results were observed.  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron were sent out later to complete the attack.  All the aircraft found the convoy: one torpedo and two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but no results were observed.

TA QALI  The runway is unserviceable for ten minutes for inspection after an air raid: no significant damage.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 8-14 October the Battalion has found two impressed lorries, one motor cycle and five Other Ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  Twin Lewis guns have been manned for Anti-aircraft defence of the Safi Strip during the hours of daylight.

15 October 1942: Luftwaffe Fighter Bombers Target Malta

  • Enemy send ten fighters to protect one bomber.
  • Enemy raiders are now dropping flares only – the reason is unclear, as following raiders rarely take advantage of the light to drop bombs on the illuminated area.
  • Since the beginning of intensified air attack Army has increased the number of soldiers assisting RAF in maintenance of aircraft and aerodromes to 500 daily.

MP SUGGESTS ISLAND SHOULD BE KNOWN AS ‘MALTA GC’

Walter Higgs MP

Mr Walter Higgs, MP for Birmingham West, today asked the Prime Minister in the House of Commons whether he is aware that an official proclamation to the effect that henceforth Malta should be known and addressed as Malta GC would meet with general approval; and will he make the necessary announcement?

MALTA AIR FORCES SCORE STRIKE ON AXIS MERCHANTMAN

Two Albacores in co-operation with a Swordfish were sent out tonight to attack a 7000 ton merchant vessel and two destroyers which had left Patras on a south westerly course.  They found it at 2153 hours, 80 miles north east of Homs and one Albacore scored a direct hit amidships.  The other Albacore which was not able to get into a suitable position to attack while the flares dropped by the Swordfish were still alight brought its torpedo back. 

Wellington bomber

The merchant vessel was left almost stationary and was found 1½ hours later by a Wellington which dropped to 1000 lb bombs but they fell wide.  Later in the night the convoy was attacked again by Wellingtons with one torpedo and two 1000 lb bombs but no results were observed owing to a partially effective smoke screen put up by one of the destroyers.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 15 OCTOBER TO DAWN 16 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine; lightning early morning and late evening.

0650 hrs  A massive formation of some 60 enemy fighters escorting six JU 88s approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and are attacked by ME 109s: Sgt Wynn destroys one.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

0705 hrs  Air raid alert.  Dogfights ensue as Malta fighters engage the enemy over Kalafrana, off Zonqor Point and over the Island.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and attack the formation.  Despite being outnumbered over fifteen to one, S/Ldr Stephens attacks enemy bombers head on, following one bomber down to sea-level and chasing it 20 miles out to sea before finally shooting it down in flames.  He is then attacked by six enemy fighters but returns fire, destroying one of the ME 109s.  His aircraft is badly shot up and he returns to base, surviving a crash-landing. 

The eight Spitfires 249 Squadron also press on to attack the bombers.  P/O Moody destroys one JU 88.  P/O Williams probably destroys one JU 88; P/O Giddings damages one.

0722 hrs  The remaining four JU 88s come in and drop bombs near Luqa aerodrome and in the Kirkop area.

0740 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a Spitfire down in the sea off Leonardo with a baler-out nearby.  An anti-personnel bomb explodes 25 yards from a post of B Company.

0755 hrs  Raiders passed.

0935 hrs  About 40 enemy fighters, including 15 carrying bombs are reported approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy north of the Island.  Many raiders drop their bombs out to sea, as well as on Marfa and Mellieha Bay, where one civilian is killed and two injured.  A few bombs fall on Gozo.  249 Squadron are jumped by ME 109s flying in pairs and threes.  Sgt Wynn damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires crash-land and a third ditches into the sea: Sgt Bryden is rescued with a fractured leg.

0940 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

1005 hrs  Air raid alert as the raiders approach the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron are airborne to intercept the raid: no claims.

1047 hrs  Raiders passed.

1151-1337 hrs  Air raid alert.  About 50 German and Italian fighters approach Malta but turn back before reaching the coast.  They appear to be searching for missing crews, and escorting ambulance aircraft.  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They see a float plane with fighter escort 35 miles north of the Island.  F/Lt Charney and F/Sgt Maher each destroy a Macchi 202; Major Swales and Sgt Garvey damage one each.

1235-1355 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to act as cover for 185 Squadron.  Enemy aircraft are sighted but cannot be brought into contact.

1358-1430 hrs  Air raid alert.  30 enemy fighters including at least seven ME 109 fighter bombers approach the Island.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron on patrol attack, forcing most of the raiders to to drop their bombs in the sea.  Bombs are also dropped on the Ta Qali and Mosta areas.

1610 hrs  Nine JU 88s approach the Island with an escort of 50 fighters.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy.  F/Lt Glazebrook damages one JU 88; Sgt Francis damages one Macchi 202.

1616 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack the enemy formation head-on over Kalafrana Bay, causing them to jettison their bombs.  S/Ldr Woods destroys one ME 109 and damages a JU 88; P/O Yates and Sgt Stead probably destroy one ME 109; several other enemy aircraft are damaged.  1st Bn Cheshire Regt report seeing two enemy bombers crashing into the sea just off Grand Harbour.  The port engine of one had been shot off.  Three Spitfires are damaged (pilots unhurt); one Spitfire is lost and F/Sgt Hiskens is reported missing.

1640 hrs  Seven JU 88s drop bombs on the Safi strip and other bombs and incendiaries on Tal Liebru, Luqa, Kirkop and Marsa.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1704 hrs  Raiders passed.

1912-1920 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy aircraft approaches but turns back twenty miles east of the Island.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

1922-1928 hrs  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne on intercept patrol but see no enemy aircraft.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is scrambled to intercept two enemy aircraft approaching the island, one of which crosses the coast: no engagement.

1940-2034 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft approach the Island; one crosses the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea off Grand Harbour and St Paul’s Bay.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

2028 hrs  Bombs are dropped near a defence post of C Company, 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

2124-2158 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach; three cross the Island.  Bombs are dropped in the sea east of Grand Harbour and on land at Zonqor Point.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

0220-0443 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine bombers approach the Island, four crossing the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs are dropped in the St Paul’s Bay and Wardia areas and in the sea.  Flares are dropped over Benghaisa Point.  Three Beaufighters 89 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: one sees an enemy raider crash north of Cape Passero.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer Edwin Hiskens, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Gzira  Joseph Scicluna, age 48.  Mellieha  Arthur Calleja, age 6.  Sliema  Joseph Letard, age 65.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 15 OCTOBER 1942

P 212 HMS Sahib

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P 212 to sea and P 46 in. The latter reported as having sunk on loaded merchant vessel and one in ballast.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Liberator, two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires damaged in enemy action: pilots uninjured.  Three Spitfires shot down by enemy fighters: both pilots baled out and were rescued, injured.  Two Spitfires damaged by enemy action crashed on landing: pilots uninjured.  One Spitfire forced to land during enemy action: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire missing over sea following enemy action: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  2300-0215 hrs  One Swordfish is sent on anti E boat patrol: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Two Baltimores 69 Squadron were despatched in search of an enemy convoy.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photographic reconnaissance of Benghasi.

16 October 1942: Hurricane Hit in Friendly Fire Incident

A Hurricane aircraft was attacked this morning by a Spitfire six miles off Grand Harbour.  The friendly fire incident happened during the confusion of an expected air raid which had not materialised.  The alert was raised just before 8.30 am when eight Axis aircraft were reported patrolling the Kalafrana area.  However, four separate groups of Spitfires scrambled to intercept the raiders failed to locate any enemy planes.

Forty minutes after the scramble, a Hurricane was despatched to search for a missing pilot was recalled with the expectation of imminent action.  Once the ‘raiders passed’ signal was given, a Hurricane was again sent on a rescue mission.  However, the Spitfires were still in the air on the look-out for hostile aircraft: one caught a glimpse of the Hurricane and fired before realising it was friendly.  The Hurricane sustained damage but landed safely: the pilot escaped injury.

137 UNEXPLODED BOMBS IN 7 DAYS

A massive increase in the number of unexploded bombs has resulted from recent enemy air activity.  The intercept tactics now used by RAF Squadrons are costing the enemy dearly – but raiders under attack jettison more bombs.  137 UXB reports have been received by Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal in the week since the Axis renewed heavy air raids on Malta.  All the reports are concentrated around the three airfields of Hal Far, Luqa and Ta Qali, and on the north east coast of the Island.

Anti-personnel bomb canister

A third of the reports were for high explosives, the rest were anti-personnel bombs or incendiaries.  The Luftwaffe is using mainly 50kg bombs again: more of them can be loaded onto each aircraft and, with fewer planes reaching target, a single bomber getting through can drop a greater number of bombs in one attempt.

Adapted from UXB Malta, S A M Hudson, History Press 2010/2012

AIR RAIDS DAWN 16 OCTOBER TO DAWN 17 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine; little or no cloud.

0625-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0649 hrs  50 enemy aircraft including eight JU 88s approach the Island.

0701 hrs  Air raid alert.   Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  The raiders are attacked 5-10 miles north of Grand Harbour.  Capt Kuhlmann and P/O Reid each probably destroy a MU 88; P/O O’Brien damages another and Sgt Gore damages a ME 109.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and seven 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled and engage the raiders.  126 Squadron Sgt Park destroys one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are lost: F/O Wallace and Sgt Wilson are missing.  1435 Squadron P/O Owen probably destroys one ME 109 and damages another; Sgt Harrison damages one JU 88 and F/Lt McLeod one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged.  The enemy bombers are forced to jettison their bombs over the sea.  Some bombs fall on land at Sliema and St Julian’s, damaging civilian property and injuring thirteen.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

0725 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a fighter crashed in the sea four miles out from Della Grazia.

0742 hrs  Raiders passed.

0800 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a Spitfire crashed into the sea two miles due north of Grand Harbour.

0829-0946 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight enemy aircraft approach the Island and patrol the Kalafrana area.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept: no sightings.

0900 hrs  Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no combat.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron are also airborne on interception: no sightings.

0905 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled but encounter no enemy aircraft.

0910 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is dispatched to search for a missing pilot but is recalled before beginning the search.

0946 hrs  One Hurricane searches 042 degrees Grand Harbour 6 miles but is attacked by a Spitfire: the aircraft is damaged but the pilot is unhurt.

0950 hrs  More than 60 enemy aircraft approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage enemy aircraft.  Sgt Francis destroys one ME 109; Sgt Ballantyne and P/O Reynolds each damage one JU 88.

0952 hrs  Air raid alert.  Fighters carry out a sweep of the Island.  Six Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  F/Lt McLeod destroys one ME 109.

1010 hrs  Seven JU 88s cross the coast near Hal Far and drop bombs on the airfield, slightly damaging an aircraft on the ground.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron make a head-on attack on bombers as they bomb the airfield.  F/Sgt Lara destroys one JU 88; S/Ldr Woods and F/O McElroy each damage one.  P/O Lowrey damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are lost: one pilot is safe but injured; F/Sgt Carter is shot down into the sea and is missing.  Four Spitfires are damaged in combat: pilots unhurt.

1045-1235 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far searches for the missing pilot: no sightings.  Four Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept enemy aircraft: no sightings.

1050 hrs  Raiders passed.

1250 hrs  35 enemy fighters, including ME 109 fighter bombers, approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They see four ME 109s but the raiders are too far away and flying too fast to be intercepted.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 35 enemy fighters including fighter bombers: no engagement.

1300-1340 hrs  Air raid alert.  The raiders cross the coast at over 25000 feet.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs are dropped near Mqabba and in the Mellieha area before escaping towards Sicily.

1505-1612 hrs  Two Hurricanes from Hal Far are dispatched to search for a missing pilot: nothing sighted.

1535 hrs  A massive formation of eight JU 88s with an escort of 60 fighters including six fighter bombers approaches the Island in six waves.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled and attack the seven JU 88s and six ME 109 fighter bombers.  P/O Williams destroys one JU 88 and Sgt Wynn probably destroys one.  F/Lt Hetherington and Sgt Budd each damage a JU 88.

1540 hrs  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Miller probably destroys one JU 88 and damages another; F/Lt Parkinson also damages one.

1615 hrs  Air raid alert.  Seven Spitfires 1435 Squadron and ten 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  126 Squadron Sgt Cherran destroys one JU 88; Sgt Marshall probably destroys one ME 109; Sgt Tiddy and Sgt Roberts each damage one JU 88.  Sgt Tiddy damages one ME 109 and F/Lt Jones damages one Macchi 202.  1435 Squadron P/O Walton, Sgt Fuller and Sgt Eva each damage one JU 88. Three Spitfires are damaged in combat: pilots unhurt.

1630 hrs  The bombers, fighters and fighter bombers cross the coast in six waves.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Four JU 88s attack Luqa, destroying one Beaufighter on the ground and damaging another, before receding south.  4th Bn Heavy Ack Ack Regiment guns at XHB 8 claim a direct hit on one JU 88 which is then seen to crash into the sea: claim one JU 88 destroyed.  The ME 109s bomb Ta Qali, rendering the aerodrome temporarily unserviceable and injuring two civilians.

1655 hrs  Raiders passed.

1700 hrs  2nd Bn Royal Irish Fusiliers Beat the Retreat in Castille Square.

1831-1844 hrs  Air raid alert.  One aircraft crosses the coast but no bombs are dropped.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

2332-2350 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft approach the Island and cross the coast, dropping flares north west of Ta Qali.  Bombs and incendiaries are dropped on the St Paul’s Bay and Rabat areas.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no raiders seen.

0246-0335 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six enemy aircraft approach the Island; only one crosses the coast.  All bombs are dropped in the sea.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer II Peter Carter, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron; Flying Officer Edward Wallace, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron; Flight Sergeant William Wilson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 1435 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties (known)  Wallenburger and Wehner: crew members of a JU 88 bomber picked up from the sea by RAF Launch.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER 1942

HMS Hythe

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept in P 43 who reported having sunk an 8000 ton southbound merchant vessel.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC 3 from LG 224. Aircraft casualties  Four Spitfires damaged due to enemy action: one pilot baled out, rescued uninjured; two pilots crash-landed, one injured.  Two Spitfires missing from enemy action: pilots missing.

LUQA  One Baltimore 69 Squadron was despatched on reconnaissance with one Spitfire 69 Squadron on photo-reconnaissance.  2330-0300 hrs  One Wellington 69 Squadron was despatched to locate and illuminate one merchant vessel sighted by the Baltimore.  Flares were dropped.

17 October 1942: Spitfires Must Win 2nd Battle of Malta

AIR OFFICER COMMANDING RALLIES RAF

The following message has been sent by AOC Mediterranean addressed to Spitfire pilots: “Grand work fighter boys.  Your magnificent fighting in the last five days is being watched not only in Malta but by the RAF on other fronts as well as by our Russian allies.  Although heavily outnumbered last May Malta Spitfires came out on top and I am confident that you will win the second battle of Malta.  Some of the enemy bomber squadrons have already shown that they cannot take it.  Keep it up and in a few days the other German bombers will throw up the sponge.  Replacement Spitfires and pilots are on the way but there is still some stiff fighting to finish the job.  Good luck to you and good shooting.”

Army operated fuel bowser

A second message is addressed to all maintenance personnel:  “Your part in the present battle for Malta is greatly appreciated but serviceability of Spitfires continues to fall.  You can and must get it up again.  Where you have worked hard you must work harder and faster.  Give the fighter boys Spitfires and they will drive the Hun out of the sky.”

RAF CLAIM SCALPS OF TWO LUFTWAFFE AIR ACES

Two highly decorated Luftwaffe ‘gruppenkommandeure’ (group commanders) were killed in air battles over Malta today.

GKmdr Major Heinrich Paekpcke was pilot of the leading JU 88 of seven bombers attacking early this morning when his aircraft was involved in a head-on collision with a Spitfire just off the coast to the south east of Valletta.  Both pilots were killed instantly, although the three other Luftwaffe crewmen seen to bail out before the bomber hit the water.  Spitfire pilot Flight Lieutenant Jones was a member of 126 Squadron sent to intercept the enemy raiders.

Gerhard Kollewe

Bomber pilot GKmdr Gerhard Kollewe was flying one of seven JU 88s and nine ME 109 fighter bombers which launched a heavy bombing raid over Malta just after noon today.  His bomber was shot down into the sea during an air battle with Malta Spitfires intercepting the raid off the coast of Valletta. Kollewe and his crew baled out but he and observer Feldwebel Bernhard Mähler were killed. Radio operator Oberfeldwebel Martin Assum and aerial gunner Feldwebel Paul Ballof were rescued alive and taken prisoner of war.

Heinrich Paepcke and Gerhard Kollewe were highly decorated Luftwaffe commanders, among the elite recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, awarded for extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 17 OCTOBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt:  The War Office

1.  Enemy air offensive during daylight resumed with great suddenness on 11 October.  Tactics: 6-8 JU 88s escorted by 30-50 fighters making an average of four raids daily on aerodromes.  These tactics are the same as the beginning of 1942 but with much increased fighter support.  The latter proved most necessary but did not prevent heavy losses German Air Force.  Spitfires made magnificent interceptions, many 15-20 miles north of Gozo and destroyed 49 JU 88s and 59 fighters, probably destroyed 27 JU 88s and 21 fighters and damaged 67 JU 88s and 64 fighters.  Heavy Ack Ack destroyed one JU 88 and damaged another.  As the week progressed, the determination to force home attacks grew weaker and bombs fell further and further from the aerodromes, eg Wardia Ridge, Mellieha and in the sea.  German Air Force towards the end of the week were forced to use fighter bombers.  Malta casualties only 24 Spitfires lost (11 pilots safe) but many damaged.  Little damage to aircraft on the ground or aerodromes.  Photo reconnaissance shows that numbers of aircraft in Sicily continue to increase – now total 660 including 196 German bombers and 238 fighters.

2.  During darkness approximately 100 bombers, of which only 34 crossed the coast.  These attacks were not characterised by the same determination as daylight attacks early in the week.  Bombs in scattered localities; little damage.  Beaufighters destroyed four HE 111s, probably destroyed another.  Heavy Ack Ack destroyed one bomber.  Approximately 33 per cent illuminations by searchlights.

3.  Own air attacks on convoys by a small number of Beaufighters, Albacores and Wellingtons resulted in one merchant vessel 7000 tons hit.

4.  Working parties were increased to assist RAF in maintaining aerodromes and aircraft.  Many UXBs dealt with.

5.  Military damage negligible.  Some damage civilian property and civilian casualties.  Military casualties one Other Rank killed, nine wounded.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 17 OCTOBER TO DAWN 18 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine.

0635 hrs  Seven JU 88s with an escort of some 25 fighters approach the Island.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to locate the enemy fighters but do not engage.

0645 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  F/Lt Charney damages one Macchi 202.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and four 1435 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy 12 miles east of Zonqor, forcing them to jettison their bombs in the sea.  126 Squadron P/O Thompson, W/Cdr Hanks and P/O Stevenson each destroy one JU 88; F/Sgt Varey destroys one ME 109.  Sgt Yeatman and F/Sgt Varey probably destroy one JU 88 each.  1435 Squadron S/Ldr Lovell damages one JU 88.  One Spitfire is damaged (pilot unhurt).  F/Lt Jones crashes into a JU 88, bringing it down: heis missing.

0648 hrs  Air raid alert.  A few remaining aircraft cross the coast and drop bombs on scattered areas from Naxxar to Madliena.  The ME 109s drop their bombs on Ta Qali.  Four ME 109 fighter bombers launch a further attack on Qawra Tower area.

0725-0900 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is airborne on a search for missing airmen: nothing sighted.

0735 hrs  Raiders passed.

0800-0900 hrs  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0915-1100 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is airborne on a search for missing airmen: nothing sighted.

0938-1007 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight ME 109s approach to within three miles of Grand Harbour, suspected to be searching for survivors.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1133 hrs  75 enemy aircraft including seven JU 88s and nine ME 109 fighter bombers are reported approaching the Island. Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and attack five JU 88s with escort plus six ME 109 fighter bombers.  F/Lt Hetherington destroys one JU 88; P/O Giddings destroys one ME 109.  P/O Seed probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Budd probably destroys one ME 109 and P/O Moody damages one.

1152 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Smith and F/Lt Charney each damage one JU 88; P/O Park damages two others and one ME 109.  Sgt Garvey is shot up and crash lands: his aircraft catches fire and he is injured.

1158 hrs  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron attack five JU 88s with fighter escort and six ME 109 fighter bombers head on.  F/Lt Parkinson destroys one ME 109.  One Spitfire does not return: pilot Sgt Miller is missing.

1210 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Tiddy destroys one JU 88 which is seen to crash into the sea at 1232 hrs.  One Spitfire is damaged: the pilot is unhurt.  The remaining raiders cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  The JU 88s drop bombs on Birkirkara, Sliema, Naxxar and Gharghur, demolishing several houses and damaging others.  Bombs fall opposite the Officers’ Mess of 2nd Bn Royal West Kent Regiment in Birkirkara.

1244 hrs  Ta Qali aerodrome is attacked by six ME 109 fighter bombers: no significant damage is caused.

1314 hrs  Raiders passed.

1502-1513 hrs  Air raid alert.  Enemy fighters approach to within 3 miles north of Comiso on a search for survivors.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1630 hrs  60 enemy aircraft including ten ME 109 fighter bombers approach from several directions at a great height. Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

1637 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: one is damaged in combat and another crash-lands with undercarriage trouble.

1652 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and eight 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  The remaining raiders cross the coast and bombs are dropped in the sea and on land in St Paul’s Bay area.

1701 hrs  Four enemy fighters launch a dive-bombing attack on the RAF station at Qawra Tower and Headquarters of C Company 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.  The raiders are engaged by anti-aircraft fire from Qawra Tower.

1735 hrs  Raiders passed.  Enemy casualties: nil.  Three Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots unhurt.

1800 hrs  15 enemy bombers approach the Island at dusk.   Three Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept but do not locate the raiders.

1810 hrs  Air raid alert.  Most of the bombers cross the coast and dive-bomb Kalafrana, damaging a hangar, and on Birzebbugga.  High explosive, anti-personnel and incendiary bombs are dropped on Hal Far airfield and Safi in another dive-bombing attack, causing craters near the runway and damaging one Spitfire.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  One HE 111 is destroyed.

1846 hrs  Raiders passed.

0024-0058 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach Malta.  One crosses the coast dropping flares over St Paul’s Bay and a delayed action bomb on Ta Qali.  Other bombs are dropped in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne to intercept enemy raiders but see no aircraft.

0315-0352 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy bombers approach the Island but only one crosses the coast, dropping flares.  The other three drop their bombs in the sea north of the Island.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Ripley Jones, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 126 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Ronald Miller, RAF VR, 229 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Anthony Camilleri, age 40; Carmela Gatt, age 45; George Zammit, age 8.

Enemy casualties (known)  Oberfeldwebel Walter Boerner and Feldwebel Edwald Futterknecht, air gunner and crewman of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner; Gruppenkommandeure (GKmdr) Gerhard Kollewe pilot of JU 88 bomber shot down into the sea and killed; GKmdr Major Heinrich Paekpcke, pilot of a JU 88 bomber collided with a Spitfire and killed; Unteroffizier Erwin Seibt, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 17 OCTOBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires missing due to enemy action: pilots missing.  Four Spitfires damaged by enemy action: one pilot uninjured; three crashed – one pilot injured.

HAL FAR  2032-0122 hrs  One Swordfish and one Albacore were despatched to attack a 7000 ton merchant vessel previously attacked on 14 October and discovered beached near Homs Harbour.  The Swordfish returned early with engine trouble, jettisoning the torpedo.  The Albacore located the target but cloud cover over the moon prevented him making an accurate attack.  He dropped a torpedo but observed no results.

LUQA  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron on patrol over Catania sees a HE 111 on the runway and destroys it.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photo-reconnaissance of Benghasi and another made a photo-recce of Homs.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  The Battalion is now finding one Officer and 50 Other Ranks for aerodrome maintenance, refuelling and maintaining Spitfires on Luqa air base.  One NCO and 18 men are working in support of the Royal Engineers Tunnelling Company working on the aerodrome.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 137.  Dealt with: 22 High Explosives, including 6 delayed action (8 x 250kg, 14 x 50kg) plus anti-personnel bombs and oil incendiaries.

(1)  Papers of Group Captain Arthur Donaldson, DSO, DFC, AFC, from The Air Battle for Malta, the Diaries of a Spitfire Pilot, James Douglas Hamilton, Pen & Sword 2006

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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4-10 October 1942: Luftwaffe Gather in Sicily

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4 October 1942: 69 Squadron Rob Rommel

HEROIC RESCUE

Filfla

Quick thinking by a pilot of 227 Squadron today saved the life of an RAF observer whose aircraft had ditched in the sea near the Island of Filfla.  Pilot Officer Briffet was observer on one of nine Beaufighters recalled early from a mission to attack an enemy convoy.  The Beaufighter suddenly lost power and ditched into the sea killing the pilot, WO 2 George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force.

Four Beaufighters 227 Squadron were sent to locate the ditched aircraft and search for survivors.  RCAF Flight Lieutenant Dallas Schmidt spotted P/O Briffet struggling in the sea and threw down his own dinghy, tied to his ‘Mae West’ life jacket.  Briffet, who was unhurt, managed to swim to the dinghy and scrambled aboard to await rescue.

Meanwhile one of the four Beaufighters developed engine trouble and was forced to land on the sea near the dinghy.  The crew were picked up unhurt by the High Speed Launch, along with P/O Briffet.

MESSAGE FROM AOC MEDITERRANEAN TO 69 SQUADRON

“Grand work 69 Squadron.  Your attack by Fishingtons last night on a 6000 ton merchant vessel was clearly an unqualified success and probably robbed Rommel of yet another important ship.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 OCTOBER TO DAWN 5 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine; lightning late evening.

0830-0905 hrs  20 enemy fighters approach the Island at great height but few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Spitfires engage the enemy; one is reported missing in combat.  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth’s aircraft is observed leaking Glycol as he crash lands at Qrendi.  The aircraft hits an obstruction on landing, seriously injuring F/Sgt Hogarth.  He is taken to hospital but later dies from his injuries.

0940-1025 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1600-1945 hrs  Three Beaufighters 227 Squadron carry out searches for the dinghy of a missing Beaufighter: nothing sighted.

2003-0414 hrs  One Wellington 69 Squadron carries out searches for the Beaufighter dinghy: flares and flame floats were dropped but nothing was sighted.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron, RAF; Warrant Officer II George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force, 227 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Irving Gass, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 249 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 4 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clocks retarded 1 hour to Zone – 1.  Rorqual and P 43 sailed. Una and P 42 arrived.

AIR HQ  Nine Beaufighters despatched to attack convoy.  All aircraft recalled early.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons, one Mosquito to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron missing.  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron crash-landed.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance from Taranto to Cape Maria de Leuca at 1305 sighted one 5000 ton merchant vessel, three destroyers and one large float plane.  1925-0315 hrs  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron, two carrying flares and two torpedoes, were despatched to locate and attack enemy convoy which was not located.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Number of personnel in hospital as a result of food poisoning has now risen to 60.

5 October 1942: Malta Sees Signs of Renewed Attacks

ME 109s in Sicily

Fighter pilots have been returning from intruder and reconnaissance missions over Sicily in recent days with reports of a build-up of Axis air forces on the Island.  This evidence, added to the increased numbers of fighters in offensive sweeps over Malta, has increased concerns that the enemy may be planning a major attack.  Today a Spitfire of 69 Squadron was despatched to make a detailed photographic reconnaissance of Trapani, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata which will be carefully examined by Air Command.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 OCTOBER TO DAWN 6 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Mostly fine to fair; slight showers in the morning.  Lightning early morning and late evening.

0805-0900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on interception and to act as cover for 249 Squadron: no enemy aircraft seen.

0925-1110 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept a raid of four ME 109s but see no enemy aircraft.

1325-1600 hrs  Ta Qali provides a standing patrol of two Spitfires over the High Speed Launch retruning to Grand Harbour: no enemy seen.

1413-1444 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy fighters which approach to within six miles of the Island and then recede.  One crosses the coast east of Delimara.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but there are no engagements.

2056-2123 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the north east of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea before receding.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Detachment Luqa are scrambled to intercept but see no enemy aircraft.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 5 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 and Parthian swept out by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Beaufort, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron force landed in the sea: crew rescued unhurt.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released all day.

LUQA  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron were airborne on interception and made a reconnaissance patrol of the Cape Passero-Comiso area but saw no enemy aircraft.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron make a photographic reconnaissance of Trapin, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata.

TA QALI  0720-0835 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.   1120-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: nothing sighted.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  B Company are carrying out coast patrol and Tal Virtu Observation Post duties for this week.

6 October 1942: Malta Infantry Prepare for Large Scale Ops

A major military exercise took place this morning at Mellieha involving Malta’s infantry troops.  The exercise, organised by 2 Brigade, started at 9 this morning and included a demonstration of Artillery operations on a large scale.  Troops taking part were members of 2 Brigade Artillery Group, 23rd Field Battery Royal Artillery, 49/91 Field Battery Royal Artillery, 1 Troop 48/71 Defence Battery Royal Artillery and 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Military leaders explained the object of demonstration which was to give Infantry troops experience in carrying out an attack under their own Artillery fire and to show the flexibility of Artillery fire.  The exercise was followed immediately by a demonstration of Allied and enemy weapons at Ghain Tuffieha.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 OCTOBER TO DAWN 7 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0950-1019 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers: one drops bombs 40 miles north of Malta, the remainder drop bombs in the sea four miles north of Gozo.  Their escort of 24 enemy fighters approaches the Island at 23000 feet; only six cross the coast.  Malta fighters dive to attack a formation of eight ME 109s which take violent evasive action and manage to escape.  Two other ME 109s are engaged; 1435 Squadron P/O Lattimer damages one; Sgt Phillips’ aircraft is slightly damaged.

1820 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regiment report a white verey light eight miles out to sea due north of Della Grazia.

2158-2220 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft, none of which cross the coast: bombs are dropped in the sea.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  They pursue one raider but are unable to overtake it.

Military casualties  Lance Bombardier Ronald Harris, 12 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery; Gunner Emmanuel Pirotta, 11 HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery, died of wounds inflicted by enemy aircraft; Private John Vella, 3rd Battalion, King’s Own Malta Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 6 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde arrived from Gibraltar with petrol and stores and P 44 from patrol, both being swept in by Rye. Clyde berths in Grand Harbour. P 44 reported having torpedoed a ship which had been beached after attack by Royal Air Force.

AIR HQ  Four Spitfire sorties on offensive recce Sicily.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Douglas from LG 224.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Douglas to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged: pilot unhurt.

HAL FAR  1515-1650 hrs  Five Spitfires carried out a reconnaissance sweep over south east Sicily.  One enemy aircraft is seen at deck level south of Biscari.

LUQA  2205-2217 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron patrols over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.

TA QALI  0725-0825 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.

7 October 1942: Victory Kitchens Threatened With Closure

Victory Kitchen

A Government Select Committee has recommended today that Victory Kitchens should be closed.  The recommendation is the conclusion of an investigation into the emergency food provision commissioned in September.  The study was launched following severe criticism in the press, both in editorial and letters sections, of the quality of food service in Victory Kitchens.

The Committee reported a lack of uniformity in taste or quantity and slated the cooks, citing examples of food being over or undercooked, even sometimes burnt or left raw.  Supervisors were also heavily criticised, with suggestions that few were up to the job.  The Committee’s recommendation for closure included the suggestion that instead all produce be distributed to the population via their rations.

The Government has issued a statement in response, questioning the basis for some of the Committee’s findings.  They rejected the proposal to issue food direct to the public on the basis that this would disadvantage those less able to pay a premium for produce.  However, it is accepted that the expansion of Victory Kitchen users from 20000 in August to some 100,000 today has created problems.  Urgent measures will be taken to address allegations in the report of poor cooking, wastage and pilfering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 OCTOBER TO DAWN 8 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0745-0845 hrs  Air raid alert for 18 ME 109s which approach the Island at a great height: few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and locate the enemy but the raiders have the advantage of height so there is no combat.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa attempt to intercept three enemy fighters but the raiders turn back before they can be engaged.

1011-1047 hrs  Three Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled along with aircraft from another Squadron to intercept 23 plus enemy fighters approaching the Island.  The Spitfires are unable to catch the enemy.

1458-1525 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 enemy fighters in a sweep, of which only three cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled but see nothing.

Military casualties  Private Joseph Pisani, 1st Malta Pioneer Group, Malta Territorial Force.

Civilian casualties  Naxxar  Teodoro Azzopardi, age 23.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 7 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise swept in from sea by Speedy, P 35 swept out by Beryl.

LUQA  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicily: nothing sighted.  1512 hrs  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance sights a convoy of two merchant vessels off Palermo.  Spitfires of 69 Squadron also make photographic reconnaissance.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 1-7 October the Battalion has found two lorries, one motor-cycle and five other ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  Two twin Lewis guns have been manned during the hours of daylight on Safi Strip for anti-aircraft defence.

8 October 1942: 9000 Houses Destroyed, 17000 Damaged

VALUE OF SHELTERS DEMONSTRATED IN MALTA  London, Thursday 8 October 1942

12 miles of tunnels dug for shelters

To the end of July more than 1300 Maltese had been killed in air-raids and 1600 seriously injured.  About 9,000 houses had been destroyed and 17,000 damaged. The Lieut.-Governor Sir Edward Jackson, who is now in London, in giving these figures added that the comparatively small number of casualties was because every man, woman and child had a safe shelter. The providing of this had necessitated 12 miles of tunnels and 18 months had been occupied in digging out shelters.

Lady Jackson said that the people of Malta were devoutly religious. The scene in a larger shelter during a raid was not likely to be forgotten. It was packed and in almost complete darkness, with a tiny candle in front of the Shrine. The sound of bombs was deadened by the prayers. They were not praying for themselves, but for the sailors, the pilots in the skies and the men behind the anti-aircraft guns…

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 OCTOBER TO DAWN 9 OCTOBER 1942

0807-0912 hrs  Air raid alert for one enemy aircraft which approaches to within 20 miles of the Island and then recedes.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1012-1047 hrs  Fifteen enemy fighters approach at between 22000 and 27000 feet, with another patrol of six ME 109s which cross the Island on reconnaissance.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1313-1328 hrs  Air raid alert for three ME 109s which cross the coast at 24000 feet before receding north.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1604-1636 hrs  Eight ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet and recede south of Filfla.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1830 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a light 4-5 miles out to sea.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Clyde to sea, destined for Beirut with passengers and cargo.

9 October 1942: Maltese Warned Against Black Market

INFORMATION OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

What do I do…about the Black Market?

  1. I refuse to buy from profiteers.
  2. I report to the Police anyone who tries to charge me more than the lawful price for a controlled article.
  3. I combine with my friends to boycott known profiteers.
  4. I go without a thing, rather than encourage profiteering by buying at an excessive price.
  5. I do all I can amongst the people I meet to form a body of opinion which condemns profiteering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 OCTOBER TO DAWN 10 OCTOBER 1942

1022-1048 hrs  11 ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet over St Paul’s Bay and recede north east of Zonqor.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

2058-2100 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft proved to be friendly.

Military casualties  Lance-Bombardier John (Carmelo) Bondin, 11th HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery; Aircraftsman Arthur Robbins, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 212 arrived to join 10th Submarine Flotilla.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photographic reconnaissance of Patras.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Battalion bugles marched the George Cross into Rabat where it was placed on view to the public.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  1730 hrs Battalion Beat the Retreat in Castille Square.

10 October 1942: Bombers Return – 15 Killed, 30 Injured in Gozo

EYE-WITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE TRAGEDY – click here

JU 88 bombers

Bombers were reported in the skies over the Maltese Archipelago in broad daylight this morning – for the first time in seven weeks.

Reconnaissance reports over recent days have provided clear evidence that the Axis are building up a large striking force in Sicily.  Photographs show some 600 aircraft across the Island’s airfields.  Indications are that a third of the Luftwaffe in the Mediterranean, and half their bomber strength, is now concentrated in Sicily.  The inevitable conclusion is that Axis high command has demanded reprisals for the successful raids on their supply convoys to North Africa.  As the air and submarine base for those attacks, Malta is now braced for further mass air attacks.

MOTHER’S COURAGE

Inez Portelli received a message that her daughter, who was staying at Inez’s sister’s house in Rabat, had been taken ill.  She set off on foot to take sugar and milk to her daughter; her son insisted on going with her.  Inez arrived to find, to her surprise, that her sister had taken her sick daughter to church:

“This appeared very strange to me because I was expecting to find my daughter in bed.  In the meantime there was an air raid alert and I hurried with my son and my brother-in-law to get cover in the nearest shelter.

Before I had gone down two or three steps, a terrific explosion sent us all reeling.  Suddenly all was confusion.  Panic-stricken people were screaming and running aimlessly around and as I looked out I saw people lying on the ground, motionless, while others were crawling away or writhing in agony and moaning.  My arm had been nearly torn away but I did not feel any pain.  My brother-in-law took one look at me and fainted.  I was laid on a stretcher and taken to [hospital]…I was taken into the operating theatre and when I came to in the morning I realised that my arm had gone.

Later on in the morning the hospital chaplain administered the Last Sacraments to me and I knew that there was little hope for me; I was so shocked that I begged them to let me die but the chaplain gently asked me whether I had any children.  ‘Yes, four,’ I said.  Then he said, ‘You will still be able to look after your children somehow with one arm but if you are not there anything could happen to them.’  Those words struck home and I was determined to go back to the family.” (2)

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING 10 OCTOBER 1942

1.  Considerable increase in enemy air activity at the weekend.  4-9 October total 123 fighter sorties in sweeps of 15 aircraft.  10 October total approximately 120 planes including eight JU 88s.  Two JU 88s dropped bombs on Gozo: 10 civilians killed, 30 wounded.  Two ME 109 destroyed, two probably destroyed, six damaged by fighters.  Ack Ack no claims.  Photo reconnaissance shows further increases – now a total of 531 aircraft including 122 JU 88s in Sicily.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 OCTOBER TO DAWN 11 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; cloudless early morning.

0730-0901 hrs  40 ME 109s flying in various formations cross the coast at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne and engage, damaging one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands; the pilot is unhurt.

0932-0935 hrs  Air raid alert for fifteen ME 109s which fly at 29000 feet over Gozo and then over the south of Malta, eventually receding north.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and locate the raiders which avoid combat.

1041-1119 hrs  Air raid alert: two JU 88s accompanied by 45 fighters approach Gozo from the north.  Malta Spitfires are scrambled to intercept and engage the bombers which jettison their bomb loads on Sannat, Gozo, demolishing 15 houses, killing 15 civilians and injuring 30 more.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta Spitfires destroy one ME 109, probably destroy two and damage three.  One Spitfire is slightly damaged in combat.

1348-1414 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 46 enemy fighters which turn away before the Spitfires can catch them.

1544-1623 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron are scrambled with aircraft of other Squadrons to intercept 30 plus enemy aircraft including six JU 88s which approach the Island.  The raiders evade the Spitfires and escape towards Sicily.

Night  Three alerts for a total of 10 aircraft of which only six cross the coast.  Flares are used over the Island.  Bombs are dropped in the areas of Gozo, Luqa and Dingli.

Military casualties  Aircraftsman John Pitt, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Gozo (Sannat)  Michael Azzopardi, age 6 mths; Joseph Cini, age 50; Saviour Curmi, age 80; Pauline Farrugia, age 70; Josephine Galea, age 30; Michael Galea, age 8; Margaret Galea, age 6; Joseph Galea, age 4; Grazia Muscat, age 50; Mary Muscat, age 30; Frances Pace, age 45; Catherine Saliba, age 35; Mary Tabone, age 17; Carmela Theuma, age 64; Lydia Zammit, age 2.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 10 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise sailed being swept out by Hythe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar; one Liberator from LG 224.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort missing in transit from Gibraltar to Malta.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

10thACK ACK BRIGADE, ROYAL ARTILLERY  Order issued detailing move of GL set to Gozo.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 9.  Dealt with: High Explosives 4 (1 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg); anti-personnel bombs 20.

(1)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Ltd, Malta 1981

(2)  The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2017 in 1942, October 1942, Uncategorized

 

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