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14 April 1942: Round the Clock Bombing – One Raid lasts 13 1/2 Hours

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1-14 APRIL 1942:  Enemy bombers 2391; Bombs 2,779,800 kg (2736 tons); Casualties 340

Bristol Beaufort

ENEMY FIGHTERS ATTACK AIRCRAFT AS THEY LAND

Early this afternoon a Special Beaufort aircraft landing at Malta after operations in the Middle East was attacked on the ground by Messerschmitt fighters.  The pilot was killed and the crew injured. 

Three more Beaufort aircraft of 39 Squadron heading in to Malta from ops. in the Middle East were shot down in the sea south of the Island, as well as two others lost during the same operation.  Other Beauforts later landed successfully under the protection of Spitfires and Hurricanes.  Six airmen are reported killed.

A Maryland aircraft returning from shadowing operations with ME 203 Squadron has been reported missing.  The aircraft left Barrani at 0700 hrs this morning and should have landed in Malta at 1315 hrs.  However, nothing has since been heard of the Maryland, either from the Middle East or Malta.  The last message from the aircraft was received at 0945 hrs GMT.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 14 APRIL TO DAWN 15 APRIL 1942

Weather  Wind cold, north easterly; 50% medium cloud.

0620-1020 hrs  ME 109 fighters patrol round the coast of the Island.

1020 hrs  25 JU 87s bomb  Grand Harbour area while four ME 109s drop bombs at both ends of Hal Far aerodrome and machine-gunning the airfield.

1032 hrs  16 JU 88s follow this plot in and drop bombs on Hal Far and the dispersal area, causing craters on the aerodrome.  One Hurricane is severely damaged and one slightly damaged.One ME 109 is shot down in the sea off Delimara; one Messerschmitt crashes 800 yards from a defence post of B Company, 2nd Bn Devonshire Regt. The pilot is killed and identified from papers as Karl Henry Krahl of Breslau.

1035 hrs  Guns of 225 Light Ack Ack Battery (LAA) engage four JU 88s and one ME 109: two guns claim total four hits on two JU 88s and one ME 109.

1045 hrs  Twelve JU 88s attack Ta Qali: six of them drop 24 bombs on Ta Qali runway.

1050 hrs  Three Spitfires 249 Squadron are escorting a Maryland in to Malta when they are alerted to an approaching enemy formation.  They attack a number of ME 109s: P/O Kelly damages one before he is shot down into the sea: he is later rescued.

1140 hrs  Guns of 225 LAA Bty engage two ME 109s: no claims.

1150-1425 hrs  ME 109s keep up a continuous patrol off the coast while a delivery flight of Beauforts head towards Malta.  Spitfires and Hurricanes are airborne, to act as escort for the incoming aircraft.

1300 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to escort another Maryland returning from patrol.  They sight Messerschmitt fighters:  F/L McQueen part-destroys one and damages another; P/O Sergeant part-destroys one.  Three Hurricanes 185 Squadron engage three ME 109s:  F/Sgt Fletcher and Sgt Lee each damage one.

1355 hrs  A Beaufort returning from operations in theMiddle East has just landed at Luqa when it is strafed by ME 109s, killing the pilot and wounding four members of the crew.

1428 hrs  24 JU 87s dive on Grand Harbour, dropping bombs in the Dockyard, Zabbar and St Paul’s Bastion areas, while five JU 88s drop bombs on Luqa.  Four ME 109s drop bombs on Hal Far near the Windsock area.

1435 hrs  Guns of 225 LAA Bty engage two JU 88s: three hits claimed.

1440 hrs  Bombs are dropped on Misrah Blandun.

1545 hrs  More Beauforts from theMiddle East come in to land, under the protection of two Spitfires and two Hurricanes.

ME 109s continue to patrol round the coast of the Island.

1800 hrs  Three returning Beauforts are shot down into the sea.  One is sighted by 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.  L/Cpl Sciberras of B Company and another man put to sea in a boat and brings in two survivors.

1805 hrs  24 JU 87s attack the Grand Harbour area.

1830 hrs  Eight JU 88s dive-bomb Luqa airfield, cratering the runway and damaging equipment.  The camp warning system is put out of use.  Bombs are dropped near Bir id Deheb and Ghaxaq encampments of 2nd Bn Devonshire Regt.

1830 hrs  Four JU 88s drop fifteen bombs on Ta Qali, including at least one delayed-action bomb.  Craters adjacent to and at the end of the runway make the aerodrome unserviceable for night flying.

1838 hrs  Bombs are dropped on the Mellieha Camp of the Kings Own Malta Regiment, including several delayed-action.

1840 hrs  Guns of 225 LAA Bty engage numerous JU 88s: 7 hits claimed.

1952 hrs  All clear.

2042-2130 hrs  Air raid warning for one aircraft which does not cross the coast.  Minutes later another alert is sounded for an aircraft approaching from the west: identified as friendly.

Night to 0540 hrs Continuous night raids by single German and Italian aircraft. Bombs are widespread and indiscriminate. Weather deteriorating.

2052-2135 hrs  One Beaufighter is airborne on patrol to intercept enemy aircraft: no engagement.

2250 hrs  Bombs are dropped betweenSelmunPalace and Torri Ghain Hadid.  One does not explode.

0124 hrs  Two single aircraft come in singly from the north and drop bombs in the sea to the north of the Island.  Meanwhile several Malta-based aircraft come in to land.

0219 hrs; 0337 hrs; 0445 hrs  Bombs are dropped on theSafi strip.

0220 hrs; 0250hrs; 0354 hrs  Bombs, including some delayed-action, are dropped on Mellieha Camp of Kings Own Malta Regiment and in the sea nearby.

Military casualties  Skipper William Orchard, Royal Navy Reserve, HMS St.Angelo; Flight Lieutenant Robert Beveridge, Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (VR), 39 Squadron; Flight-Sergeant Stanley Howroyd, Pilot, Royal Air Force VR, 22 Squadron;  Sergeant Thomas Keegan, Royal Air Force VR, 47 Squadron; Warrant Officer Joseph Lee, Observer, Royal Air Force, 22 Squadron; Sergeant Alexander Miller, Royal Air Force VR, 39 Squadron; Flying Officer Robert Seddon, Royal Air Force VR, 39 Squadron; Bombardier Eric Blunt, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment, Royal Artillery.

Enemy casualties  Hauptmann Karl-Heinz Krahl, Pilot of a Messerschmitt Bf 109 shot down by gunfire at Hal Far whilst making a low level attack on the airfield.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 14 APRIL 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Three Beauforts, four Beaufighters landed Malta from Ops ME.  Departures  One Hudson toGibraltar, one Hudson to Gambut, one Spitfire PRU, oneWellington, twoHudsons to 108 MU.

HAL FAR  Night 14/15th  One Swordfish and two Albacores despatched to attack enemy convoy: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Four JU 88s drop bombs on Luqa aerodrome.  0959-1320 hrs  One Maryland 69 Squadron on search for enemy shipping. Sighted convoy and chased by numbers of enemy aircraft: no combat.  2045-0555 hrs  OneWellington on Special Search.  Reports enemy convoy.

1st BN THE CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Bombs near Four Platoon at Rinella: wireless mast hit.

1ST BN THE DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Work on aerodromes continued.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 11; dealt with 6 (1 x 1000kg;  2 x 250kg, 3 x 50kg).

2ND BN THE ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS  31 sailors attached to the Battalion.

8TH BN THE  KINGS OWN ROYAL REGIMENT  Lt T Miller attached from 8th Bn Manchester Regt was injured in the shoulder by shrapnel from an Ack Ack shell.

11TH BN THE LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS  Hal Far working party continued: bombed and machine-gun.  1100 hrs  Our own Ack Ack light machine-guns with others engage and shoot down a ME 109.  GOC congratulates the Battalion.

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of  use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com.

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2017 in 1942, April 1942

 

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10 August 1941: Photoreconnaissance Plane Fatal Crash on Luqa

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Glenn Martin Maryland

Glenn Martin Maryland

MARYLAND’S ENGINE FAILS ON APPROACH TO RUNWAY

A Maryland reconnaissance aircraft crashed on its approach to Luqa aerodrome today and burst into flames. Pilot F/Lt P R Wylde and his crew were returning from a photoreconnaissance mission over Catania and Syracuse when the wireless operator signalled to base that their Maryland had developed engine trouble.  F/Lt Wylde managed to nurse the aircraft back to Luqa but as he came in to land the starboard engine failed.  The aircraft crashed short of the runway, killing the pilot and observer Sgt R S Mutimer instantly.  F/Sgt C Clark was rescued from the aircraft just before it burst into flames.  He was rushed to Imtarfa hospital where he is reported to be very seriously injured. 

EXTRA PERSONNEL ESSENTIAL TO DISTRIBUTE POST ESSENTIAL FOR TROOPS’ MORALE

Additional censorship measures designed to protect the security of troops on Malta are causing severe delays in the delivery of cables. A recent ban on including the serviceman’s unit in the address has caused a massive increase in the work involved in the delivery of cables to their correct addressee.  Recent sharp increases in the Malta Garrison with the arrival of reinforcements have added to the problem.

The Island currently lacks an official Postal Section; the work is currently done by six other ranks from the Royal Army Service Corps who have been attached to the Malta General Post Office for dealing with mail and cables. The Governor and Commander in Chief has applied to the War Office for additional RASC personnel to replace those seconded to the service, an essential measure if the early distribution and prompt despatch of mail can be ensured. 

Lt Gen Dobbie concludes his message with a stark reminder that: “Prompt delivery and despatch of the very limited and intermittent mail is considered absolutely essential for the maintenance of morale.”

REINFORCEMENTS NEEDED – ANOTHER HOSPITAL NEEDED

Malta is still short of Army medical personnel and facilities, according to the Governor and Commander in Chief. According to a a telegram to the War Office today, the Island requires an additional 164 Royal Army Medical Corps, including 64 trained nurses, as well as additional personnel for the Army Dental Corps and another 600 bed General Hospital with staff.  The above figures do not include Medical Corps reinforcements already scheduled for Malta. 

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 AUGUST TO DAWN 11 AUGUST 1941

Weather  Sunny and fresh.

No air raids.

While on a test flight in a Hurricane S/Ldr Rabagliati sees a Cant Z506 floatplane flying not far from the Sicilian coast. He attacks, shooting the aircraft down into the sea.  The aircraft sinks but the four crew are seen to escape.

Military casualties Sergeant Richard S Mutimer, Royal Air Force, 69 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant Paul R Wylde, Pilot, Royal Air Force, 69 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 10 AUGUST 1941

ROYAL NAVY Thunderbolt sailed for Alexandria.  830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 4 Swordfish carried out night search of East Sicilian coast and eventually released 3 torpedoes at a 7–10,000 merchant vessel in Syracuse.  Two hits claimed.

AIR HQ Departures 1 Blenheim, 1 Wellington. 69 Squadron 4 Maryland strike force patrols Ionian Sea and east Tunisian coast.  Photoreconnaissance Misurata and Tripoli.  Photoreconnaissance Catania port and aerodrome, and Syracuse.  The Maryland signals engine trouble while returning.  As it approaches land the engine fails and the aircraft crashes, killing F/Lt Wylde and Sgt Mortimer.  Sgt Clarke is injured.  The aircraft is burned out. 39 Squadron 9 Wellingtons sent to attack north west area of Tripoli dropped many bombs on target. 105 Squadron 4 Blenheims sent to attack merchant shipping scores hits and disables ship.  

HAL FAR  One Fulmar patrolled over Catania and Gerbini aerodromes and dropped four bombs on Gerbini; results not observed.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB dealt with 1 (50kg).

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Battalion in Gozo.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Battalion providing working parties day and night for unloading of convoy ships.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on August 10, 2016 in 1941, August 1941

 

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22-28 November 1942: Convoy Brings Only 3 Week Supply as Polio Strikes Malta

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22 November 1942: Malta Troops Stealth Mission to North Africa

ORDERS TO SAIL FOR ‘FRENCH PORT’

HMS Welshman

1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry received orders today to make ready to move tomorrow.  Carrying only fighting-scale equipment, the Battalion are to embark with Royal Engineers and seven detachments of Breda 49mm guns by Welshman and Manxman and one destroyer.  Their destination is top secret, referred to only as ‘a certain port’.

The port in question – believed to be in North Africa – has a population of French, Italian and Maltese, and military planners hope that the British troops will receive a friendly reception.  The plan is to land them from the destroyers’ lifeboats and skiffs instead of the usual military landing craft.  The troops will then aim to persuade the French forces in the port to support the allies, and with their help hold the town until the Battalion could be joined by larger Allied forces advancing on land towards the area.

At 1015 hrs this morning the Commanding Officer of 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry joined a conference at Fortress HQ with captains of the naval ships, Brigade command and Admiral i/c Malta, after which the Battalion’s Platoon Commanders were fully briefed.  Early this evening the CO confirmed that the Battalion was to move in motor transport to the docks at 1230 hrs tomorrow.  Parties were already at the docks and Ordnance Depots, loading up rations, stores and ammunition.

But at 2015 hrs a message was received from the HQ of 4 Brigade cancelling the entire operation.  The reason is as yet unknown.

SUBMARINE DELIVERS THE GOODS

HMS Thrasher

HMS Thrasher arrived in Malta today from Beirut, carrying a cargo of aviation fuel [avgas] as well as stores and passengers.  The submarine’s tanks had been modified to enable her to carry the maximum amount of avgas.  HM Submarine Traveller, which has been similarly adapted and loaded, left Beirut the same day and is expected at Malta tomorrow. The deliveries will help reduce the shortage of the fuel on the Island and keep its air forces operational until a tanker can get through.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 23 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Showery.

No air raid alerts.

0610-0700 hrs  Two Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far carry out an anti E-boat patrol off the coast of south east Sicily: nothing sighted.  One Spitfire is hit by machine gunfire from a ME 109 and seen to dive into the sea five miles south west of Pachino, leaving no trace.  F/O Maynard is killed.

0625-1715 hrs  Twenty Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne with other squadrons to provide a standing patrol over Malta: no enemy aircraft seen.

0625-0740 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

0720-0825 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol over Malta: nothing sighted.

0815-0930 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

1100-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on patrol: no sightings.

1200-1325 hrs; 1345-1450 hrs; 1440-1540 hrs  Twelve sorties of Spitfires 185 Squadron: nothing sighted.

1500-1620 hrs  Twelve Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne to act as cover for Spitfire bombers but did not make contact.

1515-1615 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne to act as cover for Spitfires and Beaufighters returning from operations: no sightings.

Military casualties  Lance Corporal James Humphreys, 226 Provost Company, Corps of Military Police; Flying Officer Anthony Maynard, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Vincent Sciberras, age 44.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 22 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Turbulent (L)

ROYAL NAVY  Thrasher was swept in by Hebe, who then swept Turbulent to sea.  Euryalus and ten Hunts sailed for Port Said.

AIR HQ  A message from the Navy:  “Thank you very much for your signal and for the support your fighters gave us.  To have helped Malta in her gallant battle is a great honour.”

Arrivals  Two Beauforts from Gambut; one Hudson from Gibraltar; four Wellingtons from LG 104.  Departures  One Liberator to LG 224; one Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed in enemy territory: pilot killed.  One Beaufighter crash-landed on aerodrome: crew injured.  One Beaufighter shot down by anti-aircraft fire: crew seen in dinghy.

LUQA  1200-1315 hrs  Three Spitfire bombers 126 Squadron Luqa, escorted by eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron were dispatched to attack Comiso aerodrome: bombs were observed hitting the runway.  No enemy aircraft were seen: all aircraft returned safely.  A total of 10 Beaufighter sorties on reconnaissance patrols:  one Cant Z 506B, two JU 88s and three SM 82s destroyed; one JU 90, one SM 82 damaged; one Beaufighter missing.

Night  Eight Wellington sorties targeted Bizerta docks.  Attacks were successful but hampered by rain and low cloud.  Five special Wellingtons 69 Squadron carrying torpedoes were sent to attack a 5000 ton motor vessel.  F/Lt Dokersley scored a direct hit amidships.  Four Beaufighters were despatched on a low-flying attack on Palermo: one small fire was started.  One Beaufighter is missing, two damaged.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Convoy unloading progressing well: all cargo should be discharged by Wednesday evening.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn continues unloading convoy.  One Officer employed at Red Dump.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Convoy unloading proceeding satisfactorily.  Relief party commences work at Pink Dump to give personnel 24 hours leave.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

10th Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Working parties at Pink Dump: A and HQ Coys.

23 November 1942: Operation Breastplate 

The secret mission which was planned for today involving units from Durham Light Infantry and the Royal Engineers has been revealed as codename ‘Operation Breastplate’.  The project is the brainchild of American military leaders who have requested help from Malta in securing the north-south coastal corridor in Tunisia as part of Operation Torch.  The target port has been named as Sousse.

Lord Gort

Today Welshman was ordered to disembark the army guns, stores, and extra boats which had been loaded for the operation which was called off last night. It is believed that Malta’s Governor and Commander in Chief, Lord Gort, has come out against the plan, doubting its potential to succeed.  He is understood to be concerned at the risk to the Malta-based forces, armed with minimum equipment and weakened by months of severely reduced rations.  Lord Gort has counselled deferral, at least until a full convoy arrives and is unloaded safely in Malta, to strengthen the Island’s forces and replace resources taken up by Breastplate.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 23 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 24 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Cloudy; slight rain afternoon and evening.

No air raid alerts.

0625-0720 hrs; 0715-0820 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron, then four 249 Squadron Ta Qali on standing patrol over the Island: no sightings.  Thick cloud at 6000 feet.

0900-1030 hrs  Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa and four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne for reported incoming raiders which do not approach Malta.

1100-1150 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to act as cover for returning Spitfires.

1110-1150 hrs  Eight sorties by Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far: nothing sighted.

1230-1335 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne on intercept patrol: no sightings.  One Spitfire develops engine trouble at 6-7000 feet: pilot Sgt Wallace is heard over the radio saying he is bailing out.

1425-1355 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1445-1730 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron search for missing pilot: no sightings.

Military casualties  Sergeant Thomas Catchpole, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 114 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant Carl Johnson, RAF VR, 227 Squadron; Flying Officer John Mathias, RAF VR, 114 Squadron; Flying Officer Douglas Truscott, RAF VR, 114 Squadron; Sergeant Thomas Wallace, RAF VR, 229 Squadron; Sergeant Ralph Webb, RAF, 227 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 23 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept Traveller in from sea.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one DC 3, three Beauforts to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Four Beaufighters missing from operations: crews missing.  One Beaufighter shot down by enemy: crew missing.  One Swordfish crashed in sea due to engine failure: crew saved.  One Spitfire crashed in sea: pilot missing.

LUQA  Message received from AOC RAF Malta:  “I am very grateful for the kind message of congratulations and thank all ranks Luqa for their loyal and enthusiastic support during the past five months.” 

Heinkel HE 115

0701-1115 hrs  Two sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering Messina, and harbours and aerodromes in Tunisia.  Two sorties by Baltimores 69 Squadron for weather reconnaissance Tripoli.  0805-1230 hrs  Four Beaufighters carried out a sweep in the Sousse-Sfax area: one HE 115, one Cant 506 destroyed; one schooner shot up.  1026-1200 hrs  Three Beauforts 39 Squadron escorted by two Beaufighters were dispatched on practice bombing of Lampedusa: results not observed Light Ack Ack was encountered but all aircraft returned safely.

0100-0531 hrs  Three special Wellingtons 69 Squadron on separate shipping search in Cape Bon-Bizerta area.  A special torpedo-carrying Wellington on offensive reconnaissance for shipping in the waters between western Sicily and southern Sardinia found a small merchant vessel, leading two 5000 ton merchant vessels, 88 miles east of Capo Carbonara heading west.  The Wellington made a successful torpedo attack on the leading vessel, scoring a hit amidships.  The merchant vessel was later sunk by gunfire from one of Malta’s submarines.

TA QALI  0805-1230 hrs  Four Beaufighters 272 Squadron on offensive sweep: Sgt Tucknell destroys one HE 115; F/O Coate destroys one Cant.  Visibility poor over the sea with showers; clear over the Island.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The night shift did extremely well, discharging well over 700 tons.  Total cargo discharged to date (1700 hrs today): 4674 tons.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Convoy duties continue.

1ST Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Re-organisation and re-issue of kit stored [in readiness for aborted mission].  Night  Three Officers and 140 Other Ranks were detailed for a 12 hour shift and worked throughout the night unloading flour from lighters at the docks.  One Sgt and six L/Cpls are reporting daily to the APM Valletta to assist the CMPs Valletta.  One Officer and 50 Other Ranks standing by for crater filling at Qrendi.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn provided 8 Officers, 230 Other Ranks unloading M/V Robin Locksley.  One Other Rank attached to 1st Bn Cheshire Regt as extra Tally Clerk.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Convoy work confined to unloading and storing of air force and motor transport petrol. 

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

10th ACK ACK BRIGADE  Operation Instruction issued modifying aerodrome barrages for Heavy Ack Ack gun lay-out and to keep runways free from shell splinters while still protecting them.

10th Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Working parties at Pink Dump: A and HQ Coys.

24 November 1942: Malta Submarines ‘Torch’ Attacks Leave Axis Ships Ablaze

HMS Porpoise

Three submarines returned to Malta today after successful operations in support of Operation Torch.  HMS Porpoise has just completed a short patrol in the Khoms–Misurata area. Five days ago she she torpedoed and sank a tanker which had been stopped by an aerial torpedo attack the previous day.  At 1016 yesterday, off the Kerkennah Bank, Porpoise launched a gunfire attack on the 730 ton Italian naval auxiliary Giacomo.  The vessel, which was carrying benzene, quickly caught fire and was abandoned. Enemy aircraft interrupted the operation before Porpoise could pick up more than two prisoners.

HMS P 211 (Safari) under Commander B Bryant, DSC returned to Malta from a very successful patrol off the East Tunisian coast in the Gulf of Sirte during which the submarine steamed a total of 2800 miles.  At 1431 hrs on 13 November she gunned and sank the Italian auxiliary brigantine Bice five miles off Sousse. Only the Captain of the Bice was taken prisoner; he was found to be carrying secret papers, including the week’s recognition signals for Italian aircraft and minor war vessels.  The brigantine’s remaining ten survivors were left in their boat and are said to have given P 211 an enthusiastic send off on her departure.

P 211 HMS Safari

Three days later P 211 torpedoed a 2500 ton merchant vessel at Ras el Ali anchorage.  The merchantman blew up in a sheet of flame and was still burning twenty four hours later causing the anchorage to be shut down.  At dawn next morning, P 211 fired a torpedo at a concentration of small vessels near the pier. The torpedo exploded at the landing place and an ammunition lighter blew up.  The same evening the submarine torpedoed and sank a schooner in the south western corner of Marsa el Brega.

In the early morning of 18 November a small light vessel with no crew was sunk by gunfire from the submarine, 10 miles from Ras el Ali. Later that morning, P 211 gunned an enemy tank landing craft (LCT), silencing one of its guns and causing ammunition to explode.  Then two days ago, at 1156 on 22 November, P 211 gunned another LCT two miles south of Ras el Sultan, scoring two hits. After ten minutes, the action was broken off, all ammunition having been expended.

P 247

HMS P 247 (Saracen) was also guided into Malta today, having followed Operation Torch with a patrol of the approaches to Tunis and Bizerta. At 1644 on the 5 November she torpedoed and sank an Italian Cobalto Class U boat at a range of 800 yards. Despite passing through much oil and wreckage; the submarine could find no survivors.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 25 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Showery; thunderstorms at night.

0645-0740 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa renewed the search for Sgt Wallace who bailed out yesterday.  Nothing was seen of a dinghy or pilot.

0735-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on a standing patrol to protect shipping in Grand Harbour: no enemy aircraft seen.

0735-1640 hrs  Spitfires of 126 Squadron and other squadrons are airborne on a standing patrol over Grand Harbour: no enemy aircraft seen.

0745-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron search for Sgt Wallace: no sightings.

0825-0930 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on standing patrol: no sightings.

1115-1140 hrs  Air raid alert for 15 ME 109s approaching the Island at a great height: a few cross the coast on a fighter sweep.  Ack Ack fire pointer rounds: no claims.  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: they dive to attack a ME 109 but it gets away.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are also scrambled and turn to chase ME 109s but are jumped by Macchi 202s: no combats.  The remaining enemy raiders are driven off by Spitfires.

1300-1350 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on standing patrol: no sightings.

1335-1440 hrs  Four sorties of Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far: nothing sighted.

1440-1545 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne to act as cover for returning Spitfires: no enemy aircraft sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 24 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 211, P 247 and Porpoise were swept in by Hythe.

AIR HQ  A total of 18 Wellington sorties: target Bizerta docks.  Due to poor visibility, not all aircraft dropped bombs.  Some bombs were seen to burst in the target area.  Five torpedo-carrying Wellingtons on enemy shipping search: one merchant vessel was hit and seen to be down by the stern.  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Beaufighter, two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter failed to return from operations: crew missing.

HAL FAR  0910-1020 hrs; 0920-1045 hrs; 1145-1305 hrs  12 sorties of Spitfires 185 Squadron, including an intruder raid over Lampedusa and a fighter sweep of Comiso area: nothing seen.

Malta bombers attack Sicilian airfield (c) IWM MH8054

LUQA  0700-1635 hrs  Four sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering harbours at Naples, Messina, Palermo and Cagliari.  Night  One special Wellington 69 Squadron despatched on shipping search in Cavoli-Marittimo area: nothing of importance to report.

TA QALI  0750-1155 hrs  Four Beaufighters 272 Squadron carried out offensive reconnaissance of the Gulf of Tripoli: W/Cdr Buchanan destroyed one JU 52 and at least ten khaki-clad figures were seen in the water.  1300-1605 hrs  Three Beaufighters 272 Squadron carried out an offensive sweep: F/O Coate destroyed one BV 222 and damaged one DO 24.  1420-1525 hrs  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali carried out a bombing sweep of Gela aerodrome.  Bad weather prevents all but one of the Spitfires from releasing bombs on target.  Explosions are not seen due to heavy cloud at 5000 feet.

Night  Five Beaufighters carrying bombs attacked docks at Palermo.  Only one aircraft located the target due to bad weather: no results observed.  One aircraft is missing.  Four Beauforts made two sorties and laid mines in enemy waters.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Great difficulty is being experienced unloading the 100 Octane petrol.  The fumes are very bad and men can only work for a short time in the hold.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Convoy duties continue.

1ST Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  42 drivers reported to sub-depots for convoy duties.  A detail of 40 men were sent to Brown Dump for a 12 hour shift and afterwards 20 were maintained there by D Company as unloading party till 1200 hrs on 26th.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  10 Officers, 232 Other Ranks unloading M/V Robin Locksley.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  All dumps still reduced in activity as priority given to unloading of petrol from convoy.  Commodities from dumps being removed to RASC and civilian stores.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

10th Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Working parties at Pink Dump: A and HQ Coys.

25 November 1942: British and US Military Chiefs Meet in Malta

Air Chief Marshal A W Tedder, KCB, two American Generals P W Timberlake and L H Brereton of the US Army Middle East Air Force, and the DMI Middle East Brigadier Airey arrived in Malta today en route for Algiers.  Air Officer Commanding Malta, Air Vice-Marshal Park, will be leaving with them early tomorrow morning for a one-day conference.

HMS Utmost

At noon today the Italian Press claimed the destruction of a British submarine. It is believed Utmost was spotted in moonlight while still on the surface by patrolling Italian shipping.  Her sinking has been claimed by the Italian torpedo boat Groppo, which located the submarine below the surface early this morning heading  towards Malta, and launched depth charges.  There were no survivors.

Lieutenant Coombe had only recently taken command of Utmost, which destroyed almost 70000 tons of shipping under its previous Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander R D Cayley, DSO, DSC, RN.

Utmost crew celebrate former success (c) IWM

WAR OFFICE CHECKS STATE OF MALTA RATIONS AFTER STONEAGE CONVOY

From:  The War Office                To:  Commander Malta

Cable firstly daily ration scales civil and military immediately prior arrival Stoneage.  Secondly amendments proposed as a result of increased stocks.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 25 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 26 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Mainly fair; showers in the evening.

0625-0700 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne for protection of an incoming convoy: no enemy aircraft seen.

0700-0815 hrs  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron on standing patrol: no sightings.

0800-1650 hrs  22 Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa and other squadrons are airborne to maintain a standing patrol over Malta: no enemy aircraft seen.

1055-1113 hrs  Air raid alert for a number of enemy fighters approaching the Island.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and see about 15 raiders.  One of the Spitfires does not return: F/Lt Burgess is reported missing.  Four Spitfires of 229 and 249 Squadrons are also scrambled.  Spitfires of 249 Squadron dive from 29000 feet and damage one ME 109.  None of the enemy aircraft cross the coast.

1405-1520 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron carry out a diversionary sweep: they see five Macchi 202 fighters but cannot engage.

1500-1600 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron on standing patrol over the Island.  One crash landed with undercarriage trouble: pilot unhurt.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 25 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  The Vice Admiral, Malta, reported that the unloading of the four merchant ships of Stoneage had been completed.  MLC 511 carried out exercises with the Army in Comino Channel.  Rye swept P 212 in from the sea.  Hythe swept Thrasher out: she sailed for Gibraltar and thence for refit in the UK.  Manxman sailed for Algiers, for minelaying operations under the orders of the Naval Commander, Expeditionary Force.

Fortress B17E

AIR HQ  17 Spitfires (9 carrying bombs) attacked Gela aerodrome: explosions were seen in dispersal areas and among buildings.  Arrivals  One Fortress from Heliopolis; fifteen Beaufighters from Gambut; eleven Wellingtons from Shallufa via Gambut.  Departures  Five Beauforts to ECDU.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire failed to return from operations: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  1035-1140 hrs  Eight sorties of Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far for attack on Gela aerodrome – four with bombs and four to act as close escort: one hit recorded.

LUQA  Four sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron.  0055-0259 hrs  Eight Wellingtons made an attack on Tunis docks.   Flares and bombs were dropped and a large fire started which was reported to be burning furiously.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Only five gangs required to work today.  The job should be finished by the night shif.  The difficulty unloading 100 Octane petrol is slowing up proceedings.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  0800 hrs   Working party unloading SS Robin Locksley completed duties.  Other convoy duties continue.

1ST Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  One Sergeant and 27 Other Ranks detailed to brown dump for guard duties.

SS Robin Locksley

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  Bn provided 10 Officers, 232 Other Ranks unloading M/V Robin Locksley1600 hrs  Unloading completed: 7351 tons unloaded in 127 hours.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

10th Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Working parties at Pink Dump: A and HQ Coys.

26 November 1942: Convoy Supplies Enough For Three Weeks

MALTA STILL UNDER SIEGE

The unloading of last Friday’s convoy MW 12 and distribution of stores to safe keeping was completed today, bringing some relief to the besieged Island of Malta.  The first priority was to supply sufficient aviation spirit for aircraft to continue defensive and offensive operations, and that has been achieved.

HMS Clyde

Fuel stocks are now greatly improved compared to the beginning of November when supplies were at a very low ebb.  Interim deliveries of aviation fuel by submarines Clyde, Parthian, Traveller and Thrasher from Beirut provided just enough for Malta’s fighters to stay airborne and protect the Allied convoy from the east.

The next urgent requirement for Malta is food. The Island’s siege rations are currently expected to be exhausted by the middle of December. Manxman’s delivery of 300 tons of concentrated foodstuffs helped to relieve a critical situation before the convoy arrived.  But even with the safe stockpiling of cargoes from Robin Locksley, Denbighshire, Mormacmoon and Bantam, only a small increase in rations is possible.  Further significant supplies will be needed before Malta’s population can be properly fed.

Operation Stoneage has proved that passage to Malta through the Mediterranean is still not without risk.  Enemy aircraft managed to launch attacks, one causing serious damage the cruiser Arethusa, with the loss of 159 men.  Malta’s air forces are now better placed to keep the Mediterranean open for future convoys.  But until safe passage can be secured, Malta remains under siege.

Merchant ship Denbighshire

CARGO SHIP BLAZE

A fire broke out at 1.45 this afternoon on board Denbighshire in Grand Harbour. The blaze is believed to have started when petrol fumes ignited in the empty No 2 Hold.  All available ship’s fire-fighting equipment was immediately brought into use, assisted by shore appliances.  The fire was brought under control by 4.30 pm but not before it had caused extensive damage.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 26 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 27 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Heavy rain mid-morning, becoming fair.

0655-1515 hrs  12 Spitfires 126 Squadron and 1435 Squadron Luqa patrol the Island protecting shipping in Grand Harbour.

1000-1020 hrs  Two Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept approaching unidentified aircraft: plot proves to be friendly.

1125-1205 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept a reported enemy raid which does not approach Malta.

2310-2320 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft identified as friendly.

0326-0624 hrs  One Albacore searches for the crew of a missing Wellington: nothing sighted.

0510 hrs  Three Baltimores were despatched to try and locate friendly naval units and to search for the Wellington’s dinghy.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Kenneth Cope, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 104 Squadron; Flying Officer Royston Giles, RAF VR, 225 Squadron; Pilot Officer William Goulding, RAF VR, 242 Squadron; Sergeant Joseph Watling, RAF VR, 242 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Mary Tonna, age 60.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 26 NOVEMBER 1942

P 45 enters Grand Harbour

ROYAL NAVY  P 45 and P 48 sailed, swept out by Speedy.

AIR HQ  0757-1305 hrs  Six Beaufighters carried out offensive sweeps in the Gulf of Tripoli: one JU 52 destroyed and a schooner shot up.  One Beaufighter was damaged.  Night  Considerable enemy shipping was again active between Sicily and Tunisia.  Two Wellingtons and five Beauforts were out but the weather was very unfavourable and although three torpedoes were dropped no hits were observed.  Bad weather prevented operations over Tunisi; Gerbini was targeted instead.  A total of 12 Wellingtons attacked Gerbini aerodrome: many hits on the target area causing one fire.  Photographs show many craters on the landing area, including one made by a 4000 lb bomb on the edge of the runway.

Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar; two Wellingtons from LG 104.  Departures  One Fortress, six Beaufighters to Algiers; one Wellington to LG 104.  Aircraft casualties  One Baltimore struck a vehicle on landing: crew uninjured.  One Wellington failed to return from operations: crew missing.

LUQA  Five sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering harbours in Italy and Sicily.  1945-2328 hrs  Five Wellingtons 104 Squadron were despatched to attack Gerbini aerodrome.  Bombs were dropped and fires started in the north west corner of the aerodrome.  All aircraft returned safely.  2110-2230 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron on patrol over Sicily arbited to the south of Catania observing fires on Gerbini aerodrome at 2130 hrs and a large explosion in the centre of the airfield.  Accurate heavy Ack Ack was encountered. 

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Unloading finished by 0800 hrs this morning.  30 men clearing up the ships, which took all day.

Mormacmoon in New York

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1745 hrs  Party employed unloading SS Mormacmoon completed duties.  Other convoy duties continue.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Activity at dumps slackening.  Foodstuffs being cleared from dump to RASC stores.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

10th Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Working parties at Pink Dump: A and HQ Coys.

24 FORTRESS COMPANY ROYAL ENGINEERS  Lt Johnson and 35 Other Ranks proceeded to Qrendi for work on fighter pens.

27 November 1942: Polio Outbreak in Malta

Army medical services have reported an outbreak of poliomyelitis in Malta.  The highly infectious virus was diagnosed today in a serviceman in one of the Island’s military hospitals.   The diagnosis confirms suspicions of at least two other cases since 15 November, including one on Gozo.  Malta has just one iron lung, the apparatus used to assist patients with the severe respiratory difficulties caused by the disease.

Polio has been identified in Malta before but the number of cases has never reached epidemic proportions.  However, there are particular concerns with the present outbreak, with the increased risk of spread between civilians crowded into air raid shelters and temporary accommodation.

FORCE K ARRIVES

HMS Cleopatra

Force K steamed into Grand Harbour this afternoon, under the protection of Malta Spitfires.  Under Rear Admiral Commanding, Fifteenth Cruiser Squadron – three cruisers Cleopatra, Dido and Euryalus, with Fleet destroyers Jervis, Javelin, Kelvin and Nubian – experienced no air attacks during their passage from Alexandria to Malta.  Grand Harbour is now full of ships – a sight the Islanders have not witnessed for many months.

In view of Force K’s safe passage it has been decided to send Motor Torpedo Boats to Malta as soon as the weather allows.  They will be moved to Benghazi as soon as possible, to be ready at short notice to make the crossing.  In the meantime, two MTBs will remain at Ras el Hillal to act as a striking force against any enemy shipping attempting to reach Tripoli by the Eastern Route.

Motor Torpedo Boats at Manoel (c) IWM A14545

AIR RAIDS DAWN 27 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 28 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Slight showers morning, otherwise fair.

0615-1010 hrs  Four Beaufighters 227 Squadron Ta Qali airborne to act as escort to naval units: visibility good – no sightings.

0634-0810 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far continue search for crew of missing Wellington: nothing found.

0750-0905 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on search: nothing sighted.

1030-1150 hrs; 1115-1225 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron, then four Spitfires 185 Squadron are airborne to act as escort for HM ships.

1145-1240 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron on escort patrol, followed by standing patrol over the harbour.

1355-1455 hrs  Spitfires 1435 Squadron and 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne with four of 229 Squadron to act as escort to an outgoing naval unit: no enemy aircraft seen.

1355-1500 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are airborne to act as escort to a minelayer: nothing sighted.

1430 hrs  Three cruisers and four destroyers arrive in Grand Harbour as Force K, under the command of Rear Admiral Power.  Four Spitfires, ten long-range Spitfires and twenty-five short-range Spitfires provided continuous protection for the convoy for the last 75 miles of its voyage to Malta.

1435-1550 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on standing patrol: no sightings.

1520-1705 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to act as escort to naval units: no sightings.

1632-1657 hrs  Air raid alert for enemy aircraft which approach to within 10 miles north west of Gozo.  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and patrol between 2500 and 10000 feet: the raiders turn back before reaching Malta.

1652-1657 hrs  Air raid alert for several enemy aircraft which approach to within ten miles north east of Gozo.

2051-2012 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft identified as friendly.

Military casualties  Flying Officer William Guilfoyle, RAF VR, 93 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 27 NOVEMBER 1942

HMS Upholder

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 sailed, swept out by Speedy.  Manxman sailed for Alexandria en route to Haifa.  HMS Welshman was sailed for Alexandria and Haifa to collect submarine torpedoes which are urgently required.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Three Beaufighters from LG 104; one Hudson from Gibraltar; one Wellington from LG 109; one Wellington from LG 224.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

LUQA  14 Officers, 25 Senior NCOs and 134 Other Ranks 227 Squadron arrived for operations.  0600-1700 hrs  Five sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering harbours of Italy and Sicily.  1916-2358 hrs  Six Beauforts 39 Squadron were despatched to lay mines in the approaches to Bizerta harbour: all returned safely.  14 Wellingtons 40 and 104 Squadrons were despatched to attack the docks at Bizerta.  Bombs were dropped from 4000-6000 feet and a good-sized fire started in the area of the iron ore wharf.  Night  One Beaufort found a convoy of three merchant vessels and one destroyer, 37 miles west of Marittimo.  A torpedo was aimed at one merchant vessel but a heavy sea mist made it impossible to see the results.

TA QALI  0950-1435 hrs  Four Beaufighters 272 Squadron carried out an offensive sweep between Zarzis and Cape Bon: W/Cdr Buchanan destroyed one JU 88 and damaged one ME 110.  Visibility good.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Broken Case Store Party completed duties.  Other unloading duties continue.

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged on convoy duties with additional 6 Officers, 250 Other Ranks as Brigade reserve.

28 November 1942: Breastplate Back On

40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and crew Malta 12 May 1942 (IWM)

The special mission by Malta troops to Sousse in French North Africa was reinstated today, as units were ordered to prepare for embarkation.  All guards and working parties of 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry have been on 8 hours’ notice of departure since yesterday and are busy packing the minimum kit allowed for the journey.

The embarkation force will now include one troop of Field Gunners, one of Bofors Gunners, one detachment each of Royal Engineers and Royal Army Service Corps, another of the Royal Army Pay Corps, and Commandos. The mission plans have also been amended to include several transport vehicles.  All stores, vehicles and kit bags are to be loaded onto the M/V Melbourne Star by 0300 hrs, leaving only the Army personnel, ammunition and seven days’ rations to be added immediately before departure.

TOP SECRET TELEGRAM

From:  Governor (Gen Viscount Gort)                   To:  Secretary of State for the Colonies

1.  During the month ended 20th November there were 59 alerts: 45 by day and 14 by night.  33 bombing raids: 28 by day and 5 by night.  33 people were killed (12 men, 11 women, 10 children).  16 were seriously injured (7 men, 2 women, 7 children).  29 buildings were seriously damaged.

2.  The breaking up by the RAF of what threatened to be a serious aerial bombardment in the last 10 days of October, the news from North Africa, and the arrival of a convoy of four ships including two United States vessels and one Netherlands on the last day of the period under review, added buoyancy to an already high morale.  The public is proud that Malta is hitting back and bearing a part in the stirring events of this new phase of the war.

3.  His Majesty’s Government’s gift of £10,000,000 [to Malta] is widely appreciated and acclaimed.

MALTA SPY HANGED

Carmelo Borg Pisani, convicted of crimes against the Government and sentenced on 19 November, was hanged early this morning at Corradino Civil Prison.  He had appealed unsuccessfully for clemency.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 28 NOVEMBER TO DAWN 29 NOVEMBER 1942

Weather   Slight showers morning, becoming fair to cloudy.

0730-0820 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are airborne to fly south of Comiso, searching for signs of the Spitfire of F/Lt Burgess, missing since 25 November: no wreckage is seen.

1305 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne to cover the return of 185 Squadron from attacking Gela aerodrome.

1415-1500 hrs  Two Spitfires 185 Squadron search for a missing Spitfire: nothing seen.

1430 hrs  An anti-personnel mine explodes near Dock 3 badly injuring a Maltese civilian, whose leg is blown off. 

Night  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is airborne on intercept patrol over the Island: no enemy aircraft seen.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer Class II George Edwards, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 28 NOVEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  HMS Thunderbolt arrived at Malta to join the Tenth Submarine Flotilla for Special Operations. She had sailed from the United Kingdom direct to Malta, making the passage in eighteen days.  Thunderbolt was swept in by Rye, who subsequently swept P 43 and Traveller to sea.

Axis aircraft on Gela aerodrome

AIR HQ  A total of 22 Spitfires including eight carrying bombs attacked Gela and Comiso aerodromes: bombs were dropped on the dispersal areas.  The escorting fighters damaged two JU 52s.  Two Beaufighters on a sweep along the Tunisian coast from Sousse to Zuara destroyed one CR 42.  Other Beaufighters on various patrols destroyed two SM 79s.  One JU 52 was destroyed on the ground and various targets shot up.  Two Wellingtons bombed the docks at Tunis as a diversion during a mining operation carried out by Beauforts.

Arrivals  Two DC 3 from El Adem; one Liberator from LG 224.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed in the sea: pilot missing.  One Beaufighter failed to return from operations: crew missing.

HAL FAR  1105-1230 hrs  12 Spitfires 185 Squadron, four carrying bombs, attacked Gela aerodrome.  Explosions were seen in the south eastern dispersal area.  Sgt Houlton sighted a formation of nine JU 52s just off the coast of Sicily and damaged two of them.  1800-2235 hrs  One Swordfish and three Albacores RNAS searched for shipping in the Straits of Messina: mission abortive.

LUQA  0630-1640 hrs  Five sorties by photo-reconnaissance Spitfires 69 Squadron covering harbours and aerodromes in Sicily and Italy.  Three Baltimores 69 Squadron carried out weather reconnaissance.  2145 hrs  Eight Beauforts 39 Squadron were despatched to lay mines in the entrance of Tunis harbour: all aircraft returned safely.  Eleven Wellingtons 104 and 40 Squadrons were despatched to attack Bizerta docks in two waves: bombs were seen to burst well within the target area.

Baltimore serviced at Luqa (c) IWM GM1027

Night  A photo-reconnaissance Spitfire having sighted a convoy consisting of one 4-5000 ton tanker and one 4-5000 ton merchant vessel rounding Cape Spartivento westwards, two torpedo-carrying Wellingtons were despatched to attack.  One Wellington found and attacked the convoy five miles north of Capo Orlando, in a heavy rainstorm, but the torpedo appeared to run astern of the target.

TA QALI  0635-1050 hrs  Two Beaufighters 227 Squadron despatched on operation to bomb shipping in the Sicilian channel: F/Lt Schmidt destroyed one CR 42.  1005-1415 hrs; 1400-1630 hrs  Two Beaufighters 227 Squadron at a time on offensive sweep: nothing sighted.  1300-1650 hrs  Two Beaufighters 272 Squadron on bombing mission and offensive sweep: F/Lt Rankin damages one SM 79.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Working party 1 Officer, 25 Other Ranks C Coy and 25 A Coy required to clear part of Floriana Parade Ground to make a dump for goods from the convoy.  Task will last about 5 days.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Convoy duties continue.  1 NCO, 4 men with mobile Breda gun attached to 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Breda gun and crew from GP6 report to 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry at Cammerata Barracks.  Dumps given order to close down as soon as clear of all goods (completed 1715 hrs): personnel return to Coy lines.  Motor-transport sub-depot Gzira party remain in position.  Guard remaining on Brown Dump (petrol).

4th Bn THE BUFFS  77 motor transport drivers, six 15 cwt and one 3 ton truck engaged at sub-depot.

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20-26 September 1942: Malta Forces Subdue Luftwaffe and Rommel

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20 September 1942: George Cross Presented to People of Gozo

Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

A ceremony was held today in Victoria to formally present the George Cross to the People of Gozo.  The counterpart to last Sunday’s Valletta presentation ceremony was held at It Tokk.  All the sister Island’s leading dignitaries were present including Monsignor Gonzi and Mr George Ransley, the Commissioner for Gozo.

MALTA’S MAIN CONCERN STILL LACK OF SUPPLIES

From:  Governor (General Viscount Gort)  To:  Secretary of State for the Colonies

1.  During the month ended 20th September there were 59 alerts; 38 by day and 21 by night.  9 bombing raids; nil by day, 9 by night.  9 people were killed (4 men, 1 woman, 4 children); 11 were seriously injured (4 men, 3 women, 4 children).  15 houses were seriously damaged.

2.  The principal concern of the Government remains the control and the even distribution of commodities, both local and imported.  Apart from this, the main events of the period were the departure of Sir Edward Jackson and Locker and the arrival of Campbell as Acting Lieutenant-Governor.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 21 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

No air raids.

1100-1230 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1702-1811 hrs  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far on patrol over the Island: nothing seen.

1715-1835 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Captain James Golding, Royal Army Pay Corps.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Surface plots were reported 15 miles off Grand Harbour, but faded by 0200 without having been confirmed.

AIR HQ  Twelve Spitfires carried out offensive recce over Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily attacked a ship 300 yards offshore near Licata.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One DC 3 to LG 224.

HAL FAR  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron arrived as Ta Qali was under repair.

21 September 1942: Malta RAF is Helping Win the War, Says Air Marshal

The Air Officer Commanding, Malta has received the following letter from Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Trenhard:

“I am writing you a line to say that I had hoped to have come and visit you on my way to the Middle East.  I shall fly very near you but not come down as I am told every aeroplane is of value to take you supplies, and not to use your petrol.  Under the circumstances you will realise that I must agree to this but I am sorry from my own point of view.

B flight 249 Squadron July 42 (1)

I would like to congratulate you most heartily on what you are doing in Malta.  It is magnificent.  The Air Forces are great.  It is wonderful what they have done.  They have saved the situation everywhere and are pressing on with their work which will anyhow eventually be the great instrument for winning this war.

I do congratulate you also on the wonderful spirit that exists in Malta both in the Army and in the Air Force.  I am told, and believe it thoroughtly, that all work as one and I congratulate you and your staff, all the pilots, the maintenance crews and everyone.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 21 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 22 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

1108-1136 hrs  Air raid alert.  Twelve enemy aircraft approach and observers detect and report a possible bombing raid.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled from Hal Far to intercept but do not engage.  The attack develops into a small fighter sweep with few aircraft crossing the coast.  Malta’s fighters are airborne: no engagements.

1405-1505 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are airborne on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1830-1930 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron carry out anti E boat patrol of the Sicilian coast: nothing sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  With a view to eliminate the sharp turn in QBB 273 off Zonkor Point, and provide a transit line into Grand Harbour, Speedy, Hebe and Hythe carried out a clearance sweep of the small area of unswept water near Position 2, and also a strip four cables inshore of the inshore edge of the new leg of the proposed new channel.  One anti sweeping device was cut and sunk by rifle fire.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Wellington from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  1700-1821 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron carried out offensive reconnaissance over south east Sicily: no enemy activity.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  HQ Company fired machine-guns at Pembroke Range.  Battalion swimming competition vs 1st Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.  Bn won the swimming events but 1st Bn KOMR beat us at water polo.

22 September 1942: George Cross Starts Tour of Malta

GC ARRIVES IN DINGLI

George Cross Display

The George Cross medal awarded to Malta was today taken to the village of Dingli, carried by the Inspector of Police with a small police guard.  Twelve buglers of the 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry played as the George Cross was carried in procession from the outskirts of the village to the church and placed on a plinth so that villagers could view it.  At the end of the ceremony, the Army buglers heralded the medal’s departure.

To recognise the endurance of the people of Malta, the George Cross will continue its tour to all parts of the Island, including Cottonera, Luqa, Marsa, Mellieha, Mgarr, Mosta, Mqabba, Empire Stadium, Paola, Qrendi, Siggiewi, Sliema, Rabat, Zabbar, Zebbug, Zurrieq, Safi, Senglea, Zejtun and Gharghur.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 23 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0845-0910 hrs  Air raid alert. Two ME 109s, believed to be on weather reconnaissance, approach to within six miles of the coast at 30,000 feet.  Malta’s fighters are airborne; no engagements.

1015-1130 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over the Island: nothing seen.

1215-1245 hrs  Air raid alert.  18 enemy fighters approach the Gozo to St Paul’s Bay area at 25000 feet.  Nine Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept patrol: no engagement.

1835-1935 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on anti E boat patrol: nothing sighted.

2300-0310 hrs  One Swordfish from Hal Far carries out two anti E boat patrols: nothing sighted.

2305 hrs  Beach Company, 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regt is warned to look out for a Beaufighter which might force-land into the sea.

2351-0039 hrs  Five enemy aircraft approach, three of which cross the coast.  Two are definitely identified as JU 87s.  They drop 250kg bombs on Qrendi and on Delimara Heavy Ack Ack position, where there is one slight casualty.  Other bombs are dropped in the sea south of Ta Silch and north of St Paul’s Bay.  Searchlights illuminate one aircraft and Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0023 hrs  A hostile shipping plot is reported ten miles off Grand Harbour.  Beach Companies Kings Own Malta Regiment are warned and Coastal Defences are ordered to open fire if necessary.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant James Burrett, Royal Australian Air Force;Sergeant William Doodson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR);Flying Officer Aubrey Izzard, Royal Canadian Air Force; Flying Officer Ralph Jones, RAF VR; all 39 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 1942

HMS Proteus

ROYAL NAVY  The new channel QBB 288 was declared open.  Speedy swept Proteus into harbour.  Swona swept to Marsaxlokk and back.  3rd ML Flotilla swept area to NE commenced on 15th and 16th but had to abandon the operation after 4 hours owing to the weather. 6 moored mines were cut.  Swona carried out SA and LL sweep of Marsaxlokk and approaches and also of QBB 273.  Hythe swept P 35 to sea and P 46 in from patrol. She reported having sunk a schooner and two merchant vessels.

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out offensive recces over Sicily: no enemy sighted.  Nine Beauforts and seven Beaufighters despatched to attack enemy convoy of one tanker escorted by three destroyers.  One, possibly two hits on tanker.  One Beaufort missing, one Beaufighter damaged.

Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort damaged by accompanying Beaufighter and crashed into the sea: crew missing.  One Beaufighter crashed into Beaufort while on operations: crew uninjured.  One Beaufighter damaged by enemy action crashed while attempting to land: crew slightly injured.

HAL FAR  1505-1610 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol south east Sicily: nothing seen.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  C Company started their three day march.  Left billets at 0800 hrs, arrived at Mellieha Bay about 1215 hrs – distance about 13 miles.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  All Companies in the Battalion except C Coy began classification firing at Ghain Tuffieha.

23 September 1942: RAF Aircraft in Fatal Mid-Air Collision

The crew of a Malta based Beaufort were killed last night when their aircraft was in collision with a Beaufighter during an attack on an enemy convoy.  The Beaufort of 39 Squadron was one of nine sent with seven Beaufighters of 227 Squadron to target a 6000 ton tanker with three destroyers as escort, ten miles west of Antipaxos.  They reached their target as daylight was failing.

Beaufort 39 Squadron before take-off at Luqa

Two Beaufighters raked the leading destroyers with cannon fire, causing a small explosion on one, and succeeding in their objective of drawing the flak away from the torpedo-carrying Beauforts which attacked the tanker from port and starboard.  Eight torpedoes were released, scoring one definite hit and one possible hit on the tanker and causing an explosion.  Black smoke would be seen two miles away.  The other Beaufighters drove off three JU 88s accompanying the convoy.

During the mission one Beaufort collided with a Beaufighter and crashed into the sea.  The Beaufort crew are reported missing, presumed dead.  They have been named as Flight Sergeant James Burrett, Sergeant William Doodson, Flying Officer Aubrey Izzard and Flying Officer Ralph Jones; all 39 Squadron.

The Beaufighter remained airborne but late last night Malta’s coastal defences were warned to keep a look out for the damaged aircraft which might force-land into the sea.  The Beaufighter made it back to base but crashed while attempting to land, causing slight injuries to the crew.

Later in the night six Wellingtons of 69 Squadron found the convoy again, this time 33 miles south west of Antipaxos.  The destroyers attempted to lay a smoke screen, but this was blown away by the wind.  The Wellingtons dropped twenty 500lb bombs dropped, some of which fell within 15 yards of the port side of the tanker.  According to reconnaissance photographs taken at first light the tanker has been forced to take refuge in Patras Harbour.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 23 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 24 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

AM  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are despatched on air sea rescue to 35 miles north of Grand Harbour but find nothing.

0958-1143 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept patrol (two return early): no sightings.  Four more patrol 30 miles north of the Island: no sightings.

1055-1135 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept two enemy aircraft but develop radio trouble and return to base: nothing sighted.

1350-1409 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and climb to 20000 feet over Grand Harbour before flying at 14000 feet to within ten miles of the Sicilian coast: nothing seen.

1605-1710 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

0005-0030 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers, none of which cross the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea off Delimara.  One is engaged by 4th Bn Heavy Ack Ack Regt.  The enemy raider shoots down the searchlight beams with his machine gun.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer Ian Preston, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  1845-2205 hrs  Two Beaufighters are despatched on intruder patrol: one shoots up E boats and submarines moored at Trapani.  The other shoots up a seaplane station.

Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beaufighters to Abu Sueir.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire believed damaged by enemy fighters: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  1740-1850 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron carried out a sweep of south east Sicily: enemy aircraft reported but not seen.  2300-0325 hrs  One Swordfish RNAS carried out two anti E boat offensive patrols: nothing seen.

TA QALI  Aerodrome was unserviceable while new drainage system was being installed across the centre of the landing ground.  229 Squadron detachment operated from Luqa.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Company fired on F Range Pembroke: results very good.

24 September 1942: Malta Bombers Praised for Strike Against Rommel

MESSAGE FROM AIR OFFICE COMMANDING READS

Beaufighter as flown by 227 Squadron

“Well done again 227 Squadron.  Your successful bombing of a merchant vessel on September 17th has deprived Rommel of yet another ship carrying important supplies.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 25 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0800-0835 hrs  Air raid alert for seven ME 109s approaching the Island.  Nine Spitfires 249 Squadron (one spare returned early) are scrambled to intercept.  Blue Section sights four ME 109s but lose them in the sun.  Red Section report no sightings.  Only three enemy raiders cross the coast at 27000 feet.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds: no claims.

1025-1055 hrs  Air raid alert as nine ME 109s approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept with no sightings.  Six enemy raiders cross the coast at 23-270000 feet.  Malta’s fighters are airborne and engage.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

1705-1720 hrs  Air raid alert for six enemy fighters which cross the coast and carry out a fighter sweep from Gozo to Kalafrana.  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: nothing sighted.

1900 hrs  One Spitfire returning from Luqa is damaged on landing: pilot P/O Williams is uninjured.

Military casualties  Major Douglas Armstrong, 57 Field Hygiene Section, Royal Army Medical Corps.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Proteus sailed for Gibraltar, being swept out by Hebe.

AIR HQ  Two Beauforts of 39 Squadron made their first night torpedo attack on a convoy of three destroyers, one small unidentified naval vessel and a 5/6000 ton merchant vessel, which was coast crawling northwards, ten miles north of Point Stile.  Two torpedoes were dropped but although they were seen to run well the results could not be observed, as the aircraft had to fly into the moon on leaving the target.  One Hurricane and two Beaufighters carried out intruder patrols over Sicily.  Arrivals  Three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  0625-0755 hrs  Ten Spitfires made a reconnaissance sweep over south east Sicily: no enemy activity.

TA QALI  1735-1900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron and nine of 249 Squadron (one of each Squadron returned early) on Rodeo raids.  P/O Beurling 249 Squadron sighted one unidentified enemy aircraft: no combat.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Company fired machine-guns on F range Pembroke.  C Coy marched back from Mellieha, arrived at billets about 1330 hrs.  B & D Coys held a night exercise.

25 September 1942: Luftwaffe Fighters Flee in Face of Spitfires

US AIR FORCE LIBERATORS ATTACK BENGHAZI – MALTA RECONNAISSANCE PILOTS REPORT SUCCESS

Port of Benghazi before attacks

Photographs taken of Benghazi by Malta reconnaissance pilots have revealed the success of a recent raid by US air force Liberators.  A 7000 ton merchant vessel which had been unloading in the port has clearly been blown to pieces, together with most of the improvised jetty at which she was moored.  The destruction of the jetty has reduced by half the wharfage available to the enemy for unloading large ships at Benghazi.  Another 7000 ton ship was also reported to be damaged.

BEAT THE RETREAT

At dusk this evening, Castile Square echoed to the moving tradition of Beat the Retreat, by the band and drums of 2nd Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment.  The ceremony at 1800 hrs was performed before the General Officer Commanding, Malta and other dignitaries, plus many onlookers who gathered to enjoy the moment.  A brief air raid alert at 1750 hrs threatened to disrupt proceedings but the yellow flag only was raised over the Castile and it was decided to continue with the parade.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 25 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine: visibility good – slight early morning haze.

1115-1145 hrs  Air raid alert for twelve ME 109s approaching the Island. Ten Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and encounter the raiders 35 miles north east of Grand Harbour.  They destroy two ME 109s and damage one.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands: the pilot is uninjured.

1750-1815 hrs  Air raid alert.  17 ME 109s approach to within 10 miles of Gozo.  Malta fighters see the enemy but are unable to engage as the raiders flee northwards to avoid conflict.

Night  No alerts.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                         Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 arrived from Gibraltar to join 10th S/M Flotilla and was swept into harbour by Hebe.  P 34 sailed for the United Kingdom, and P 42 and Una on patrol, all being swept out by Hebe.  Weather unsuitable for air operations.

AIR HQ  Three Beaufighters despatched to attack a minesweeper in the area Kuriat to Sfax.  Target not located.  One Cant 506 B destroyed.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Five Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC 3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crash landed due to enemy action: pilot uninjured.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

TA QALI  0645-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol sight barges loaded with sacks but do not attack.  1530-1630 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance cross the Sicilian coast: no sightings.

26 September 1942: Malta Attacks Enemy Tanker, Merchantmen, Destroyers and Subs

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  The War Office        Rptd:  C in C Middle East

1.  Enemy air: Six alerts daylight for total 83 aircraft – high fighter sweeps: two ME 109s destroyed, one ME 109 damaged.  Seven aircraft approached Bight, four crossed coast, bombs Qrendi and Delimara areas.

2.  Own air:  Day (A) Nine Beauforts, seven Beaufighters attacked tanker escorted by three destroyers.  One, possibly two, hits on tanker.  One Beaufort missing, one Beaufighter damaged.  (B)  Three Beaufighters despatched to attack minesweeper: target not located.  One Cant 506B destroyed.  (C)  Over 100 Spitfire sorties offensive reconnaissance Sicily.  One ME 109 destroyed, one probably destroyed, without loss.

Night  (A)  Six Wellingtons attacked tanker: stick of bombs within 15 yards.  (B)  Three Beauforts attacked 5/6000 ton merchant vessel escorted by three destroyers: results not seen.  (C)  Total five Beaufighters, one Hurricane, on intruder patrols Sicily: E boats and submarines Trapani and small ship off Licata machine-gunned.

3.  General: Approximately 450 soldiers daily detailed to assist RAF.

4.  Military casualties and damage: one officer wounded last April now died; one other rank slight casualty.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 26 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 27 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Weather fine; visibility good.

0910-1030 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept a report of approaching enemy aircraft.  The raid does not materialise and no raiders are seen.

1040-1130 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1735-1835 hrs  Ten Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept enemy aircraft (two return early with radio trouble).  The raiders retreat before they are seen.

2005-2035 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy bombers approaching the Island; only one crosses the coast and is illuminated by searchlights for 3 ¾ minutes.  All bombs are dropped in the sea.

Military casualties  Gunner Joseph Pulis, 11th AA, Royal Malta Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY Hebe swept Utmost in from patrol and then proceeded to Dockyard for retubing of boilers. P 211 sailed, being swept out by Hythe.  A report of a fire in the Dockyard area turns out to be a crashed bomber (identified as friendly).

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out offensive recces over Sicily.  One ME 109 destroyed, one probably destroyed.  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Castel Vetrano: no sightings.  Arrivals  One Spitifre from LG 28.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed on landing: pilot uninjured.  One Beaufighter engine failure: crew injured.

TA QALI  1345-1435 hrs  Three Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol cross the Sicilian coast over Comiso: no sightings.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 24.  Dealt with: 6 High Explosives (2 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg;); 1 anti-personnel container; 18 anti-personnel bombs; 9 oil incendiaries.

(1) Canadian Air Aces and Heroes, WWI, WWII and Korea

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6-12 September 1942: Malta Prays as Children Cry for Bread

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DON’T MISS – 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF GEORGE CROSS PRESENTATION TO MALTANEXT WEEK ON 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

“We were very close to starvation…I remember one particularly moving scene when a five year old boy with tears streaming down his face kept asking his mother for a slice of bread and the mother, weeping, saying, I haven’t got any, my son’… none of us there had any food to give him.”  Carmen Sapiano (1)

6 September 1942: Malta Unites to Pray for Deliverance

Barracca Chapel, Valletta

The population of Malta, military and civilian alike, attended churches across the Island today to mark a National Day of Prayer.  At 10 o’clock this morning the Army’s General Officer Commanding joined troops at the Barracca Church for a special service, followed by a parade outside the church and march back to barracks.  This evening the GOC inspected the Home Guard at Qormi, Birkirkara, Sliema and St Julian’s.

ATTACK ON AXIS CONVOY COSTS THIRTEEN AIRMEN

This morning two 7000 ton merchant vessels from Taranto were seen to join up with 4800 ton SS Ankara and another 7-8000 tons merchantman from Brindisi.  The convoy then proceeded south eastwards towards the Greek coast, escorted by eleven destroyers and patrolled by six Macchi fighters and six JU 88s.

Receiving details of the convoy, Air HQ Malta ordered nine Beauforts of 39 Squadron into the air, with eleven Beaufighters of 89 and 227 Squadrons.  At 1330 hrs this afternoon, the attacking force caught up with the convoy 30 miles south of Cape Santa Maria di Leuca and attacked.  Five of the Beaufighters drew the fire of the enemy air escort, destroying one JU 88, probably destroying a Macchi 200 and damaging one JU 88, one Macchi 200 and a flying boat.

Meanwhile the remaining six Beaufighters swooped in to divert defensive flak from the convoy, raking the destroyers and merchant ships with machine-gun and cannon fire, and dropping twelve 250 lb bombs, scoring several near-misses.  Cleared to reach their target, the Beauforts released eight torpedoes, scoring at least one hit and another possible on a merchant vessel, which began to belch smoke.  The Beauforts also destroyed one Macchi 200 and damaged two others as well as one JU 88.

Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or anti-aircraft flak during the raid.  One Beauforts and three Beaufighters failed to return from the raid: thirteen Air Force personnel have been reported missing, presumed killed.  The crew of the Beaufort piloted by Flight Sergeant Watlington had a lucky escape when their aircraft was hit and damaged by enemy fighters.  Wireless Operator, Sergeant Hugh McIllaney and Air Gunner, Sergeant Leslie Tester, were both wounded by shrapnel.  The Navigator Sergeant Charles Grant, rushed help, administering first aid to stop the bleeding.  Sgt Grant then took over the Vickers gun to ward off further enemy attackers.  Despite damage to The Beaufort’s hydraulics, flaps, tail assembly and turret, Flt Sgt Watlington managed to fly it back to Luqa and make a safe landing.

Later reconnaissance missions report that only three merchant ships and ten destroyers remained in the convoy: one merchantman was reported beached near Corfu.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

1405-1414 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft come to within 20 miles of the coast and then recede.

1720-1830 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to cover a returning fighter sweep: no sightings.

1910-1935 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron search for missing aircraft.

Maqluba Church

2038 hrs  HQ Coy, 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment report a ‘golden rain’ rocket over west Zurrieq, moving towards Maqluba Church.  C Company patrol but report seeing nothing.  Rocket believed to have been used by villagers.

Military casualties  Sergeant Arthur Calvert, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant James Cunningham, RAF VR, Wireless Operator/Air Gunner; Sergeant Edward Cox, RAF VR; Sergeant Kevin Duncan, RAF VR; Lieutenant R Clifford Evans, South African Air Force, pilot; Flight Sergeant Roy Gibbons, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant Donald Sharman, RAF, pilot; Sergeant Michael Wadham, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Robert Watson, RAF VR, all 39 [Beaufort] Squadron.

Sergeant Albert Cusworth, RAF VR, Navigator; Lieutenant Frederick Noome, South African Air Force, pilot; Flying Officer Dennis Partridge, Royal Australian Air Force, pilot; Sergeant Anthony Vivian, RAF VR, navigator; all 227 [Beaufighter] Squadron.

Gunner Carmel Buttigieg, 3 LAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 6 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P44 to sea and then anchored at Marsaxlokk.  An enemy merchant vessel was attacked when in convoy off Cape Ducato, by Beaufighters and Beauforts, and was hit and probably sunk.

AIR HQ  Night  Four Wellingtons were despatched to attack enemy shipping: no sightings.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; five Wellingtons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC3, two Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington ran off the runway during take-off and crashed into a Beaufighter: crew uninjured. One Beaufort crashed on landing with hydraulic and turret trouble: crew uninjured.  Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or flak while on shipping strike: one Beaufighter was seen crashing into the sea, two others and one Beaufort failed to return to base: all four crews are missing.  One Beaufort’s Wireless Operator/Air Gunner was killed but the rest of its crew returned uninjured.  Two Wireless Operators/Air Gunners were injured on board another Beaufort; the rest of the crew were unhurt and all returned to base.  The crews of the remaining two Beauforts escaped injury and returned to base.

LUQA  0730 hrs  Holy Communion in Poor House Cinema.  2030 hrs  Community hymn singing.

TA QALI  0700-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron were despatched on offensive reconnaissance.  S/Ldr Woods attacked one of two 25 ton grey motor-driven two-masted craft, obtaining strikes on the hull and cabin with a four-second burst of cannon and machine-guns.  The other Spitfires did not fire, in some doubt as to the identity of the craft.  1110-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no sightings.

7 September 1942: Wellingtons Attack Surviving Axis Ships

RAF armourers prepare 500lb bombs for convoy attacks

The surviving vessels of the Axis convoy attacked by Malta air forces yesterday were today reported continuing on their course south eastwards.  Today three Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were sent to carry out a further attack.  Fifty miles north of Cape Aamer the Wellingtons came upon two merchant vessels with three destroyers as escort.  The bombers released twelve 500lb bombs which they reported landing within 10 yards of the larger merchant ship.  No damage report has yet been received.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0645-0745 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali search for a missing Beaufort crew: no sightings.

1210-1256 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and orbit the Island at 12000 feet: nothing seen.

0103-0118 hrs  Air raid alert: one enemy aircraft drops bombs in the sea five miles north east of Grand Harbour.  A Malta night fighter is airborne and chases the unidentified raider but is unable to intercept.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Wallis Brown, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

P46 HMS Unruffled returns to Malta after patrol

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P46 and Utmost in from sea.  While towing targets in St Paul’s Bay area, WD vessel Clive swept two mines with her towing wire.

AIR HQ 1928-2300 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, four Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Beauforts, three Wellingtons to LG 224.

HAL FAR  0748-0850 hrs  Seven Spitfires (one spare) flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Camp cinema: Tarzan Finds a Son.

TA QALI   1130-1240 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two returned early): no enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  B Coy fired light machine guns on Pembroke Range.  Other Coys on intensified training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Brigade ordered special vigilance for mine-watching posts.

Tuesday 8 September 1942: Maltese Go Hungry As Rations Prove Inedible

Thousands who were served at Victory Kitchens today with a new rationed version of Balbuljata (2), using powdered eggs with minced vegetables, threw the food away in protest.  This is the second time a dish has been rejected as unpalatable: a week ago liver stew was found to be too bitter to stomach.

As well as claiming the Balbuljata was inedible, people expressed fury at the small portion on offer: no more than two tablespoonfuls, with another two of peas.  The Government decided that due to shortages the dish must remain on the Victory Kitchen menu but subscribers will be allowed to opt out of the meal by paying for six meals instead of seven weekly.  So far, very few have taken up the offer as they have no alternative way to feed themselves.  (3)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch

1008-1032 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four ME 109s cross the Island at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are scrambled to intercept: one Spitfire is shot down into the sea off Bubaqra Battery.  The pilot bales out and is later picked up uninjured by the Rescue Launch.

1050-1125 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1550-1700 hrs  Ten Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept three unidentified enemy aircraft: no engagement.

1855-1920 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0001-0010 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within 15 miles of the Island.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                         Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ   2240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire was shot up by enemy fighters: pilot baled out, landed in the sea and was rescued uninjured.

HAL FAR  1127-1251 hrs  Ten Spitfires (two spare, which returned early) flew over Lampedusa: nothing seen.  1824-1932 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily as far as Comiso on Rodeo: no enemy aircraft seen.

LUQA  Camp cinema:  Rhythm on the River

TA QALI  0750-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two return early): no enemy aircraft sighted.  1500-1600 hrs  Ten Spitfires 229 Squadron and twelve of 249 Squadron on Rodeo (four of 229 return early).  Four enemy aircraft were sighted but no interception possible.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy commenced firing on Pembroke Range.  B Coy commenced changeover of billets Polverista to Dockyard.  C Coy normal training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Lighter down in the sea 214 degrees Ta Silch Observation Post, two miles out.

9 September 1942: Black Marketeers Face Jail 

32 days prison for stealing a tin of corned beef

…we could no longer get enough bread to satisfy our hunger on the grounds that supplies of flour are just about enough to meet the needs of the registered families.  At that stage my family began to really feel the hunger brought on by the shortages…Protection Officers, with their staff, had the job of organizing the distribution and control of food to the families in their district. Each family was issued with a Ration Card. On it was written the number of men, women and children and the total weight of bread the family is allowed per day. Besides the allowance of bread, on the card was written the quantities of other foodstuff allowed per fortnight… At the back of the card there used be a number of squares printed with a number in each square [to] represent the day of the month.

Black market was rampant in towns and villages. The suppliers were normally the farmers who insisted on gold rather than paper money for payment…In view of the very grievous situation Malta was in at the time, the authorities took an extremely serious view of any stealing of goods which was costing so many lives and ships to bring in to the starving population and the garrison. Just one typical example: caught stealing one tin of corned beef off an unloading operation in the ports was punishable with thirty two days imprisonment.”  J A Zahra, 2011

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-0935 hrs; 1010-1040 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron at a time scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1330-1342 hrs  Air raid alert.  15 enemy fighters approach but none cross the coast.

1313-1409 hrs  Ten Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far and patrol over St Paul’s Bay and the Island: nothing seen.

2236-2308 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within five miles of Dingli, dropping bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                              Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy, Hebe, Rye and 4 motor launches carried out a clearance sweep from position 210 miles to the northward. No mines were swept. The sweepers were reported as a convoy by German fighters.  The two mines cut by Clive‘s towing wire the previous day were sunk by gunfire.

De Havilland Flamingo

AIR HQ   Twelve Spitfire sorties on offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  One Macchi 202 and one ME 109 destroyed for the loss of one Spitfire.  2250 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, one Flamingo, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire failed to return from a fighter sweep over enemy territory; believed force-landed: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  0930-1045 hrs  Seven Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo and attacked 3-4 enemy aircraft over Biscara.  Captain Kuhlmann shot down a Macchi 202.  Sgt Weaver, DFM crash-landed in Sicily and was taken prisoner.  1730-1840 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert: Fly Gang in a new show.

TA QALI  0650-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no enemy sighted.  1400-1500 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (one spare returned early).  A few bursts of light flak 45 miles north east of Gela.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  B Coy continued move and D Coy moved from St Clements to Polverista.  Remainder on training.

10 September 1942: Victory Kitchens Need Urgent Review, Says Strickland

Colonel R Strickland today moved a motion in the Council of Government to appoint a Select Committee to report on the running of the Victory Kitchens and make recommendations for improvements.  The food distribution system is now struggling under the sheer weight of demand: since 1st August, the number of subscribers has trebled to 60,000.  Many have felt forced to join since the Communal Feeding Department is now commandeering all available produce, leaving those outside the scheme unable to obtain meat or vegetables.  Introducing his proposal, Col Strickland highlighted the people’s complaints:

“Extreme dissatisfaction prevails regarding the running of the Victory Kitchens, and the lot of the housewife has become well nigh impossible…The personnel employed in the Victory Kitchens is not suitable…[lacking] adequate knowledge of local customs and of Maltese habits and tastes…The Department is buying supplies at prices above the established controlled price…Cooks maintain that too much food is given to them, they do not cook it, by next morning it disappears…The cooking is bad…Another serious thing [is the] unequal portions being meted out…” (2)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather   Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0735-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0835-0930 hrs  Four  Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to cover 1435 Squadron returning from a fighter sweep.

1003-1111 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far area scrambled on intercept patrol: nothing seen.

2000 hrs  Observers report three shipping plots three miles north east of the island.

2020 hrs  C and D Coys, 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report small craft in DELs, 30 degrees RA3. 

2030 hrs  Dorsetshire Regt report more craft in DELs: guns fire.

0005-0036 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach to within 10-15 miles of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Sergeant Roland Ainsworth, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR);  Sergeant Thomas Kirkham, RAF VR; Sergeant William Law, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant James Pilling, RAF VR; Pilot Officer John Pope, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Ruskin Rice, Royal Canadian Air Force; Sergeant Joseph Sloan, RAF VR; all 202 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  2130 hrs  Three MTBs were reported from the plot one mile from the coast between Madliena and St. Paul’s Bay. Nothing was sighted.

AIR HQ  0010-0240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  0636-0756 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing seen.

LUQA  Luqa beat the Merchant Navy in a cricket match at Marsa:  Luqa 107 for 6 declared; Merchant Navy 104.  Camp cinema:  Lady of the Tropics.

TA QALI  1000-1105 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on offensive reconnaissance.  Enemy aircraft were reported but none sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  One Officer and one NCO attended bomb recce course under Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal.  B, C and D Coys held weekly night exercise.

11 September 1942: Malta Commanders Gather in Secret

Bomb damage in Palace Square, Valletta

Malta dignitaries, military and civil defence personnel gathered in Valletta today in conditions of the utmost secrecy to rehearse for the formal presentation of the George Cross to the Island which takes place on Sunday next.  With the recent reduction in air attacks and the evident superiority of the RAF in the skies over Malta, the Governor and Commander in Chief has decided it is now safe for the important ceremony to take place.  However, for security reasons it has been decided not to announce details of Sunday’s event beyond Malta’s shores.

The George Cross will be officially handed over by Lord Gort to Sir George Borg, Chief Justice of Malta at 9.15 am in Palace Square, which has been cleared of debris for the occasion.  The Royal Malta Artillery have been chosen to provide the guard of honour and the band of the King’s Own Malta Regiment will play for the ceremony.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

1024-1038 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy fighter approaches the Island at 6000 feet to within eight miles of Grand Harbour, then recedes.

1200-1250 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on patrol: no enemy aircraft sighted.

2330-0042 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach the Island.  One comes within five miles north of St Paul’s Bay and another 15 miles west of Dingli: both drop bombs in the sea.  The third crosses the coast and drops bombs on the northern end of Ta Qali.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P35 was swept out by Hebe and proceeded on patrol.

AIR HQ  Two Wellingtons were despatched to locate and destroy a submarine in the Benghazi area: no sighting.  Arrivals  One Hudson, two Wellingtons from Gibraltar; one DC3 from Shallufa.  Departures  One Flamingo, one DC3 to LG 224; one Hudson to Gibraltar.

LUQA  Camp cinema: At the Circus.

TA QALI  0725-0820 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1125-1300 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1830-1940 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on shipping patrol: no sightings.

10th Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Dress rehearsal for presentation of George Cross to Malta.

12 September 1942: Malta Air Forces 40 Attacks in 7 Days

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  The War Office

Ta Qali

 

1.  Enemy air activity slight.  22 fighter sorties by day, 18 bomber sorties by night.  One bomber crossed the coast: bombs on Ta Qali.

2.  Beauforts and Beaufighters attacked a convoy of four merchant vessels and eleven destroyers.  One merchant vessel hit, one probably hit.  Two enemy aircraft escorting destroyed, one probable, six damaged.

3.  Military damage and casualties [in Malta] nil.  Training continues.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-1025 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1122-1226 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and patrol the Island between Comino and Zonqor at 14000 feet: nothing seen.

1216-1308 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are airborne as cover for returning Spitfires, patrolling ato 14000 feet, 30-40 miles north of Grand Harbour: nothing seen.

2143-2203 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach the Island at 23-26000 feet but drop all bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Qrendi  Grezzju Dalli, age 52.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe carried out search of QBB 273.

AIR HQ  Twelve Spitfires carried out an offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  Four Beaufighters were despatched on shipping strike: no sightings.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter swung off the runway during take-off: crew uninjured.

HAL FAR  1530-1626 hrs  Four Spitfires were despatched on Rodeo to south east Sicily: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert.

TA QALI  1135-1235 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast encountered heavy Ack Ack at 16000 feet, accurate at height being only 250-500 yards behind Spitfires.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 18.  Dealt with: 10 High Explosives inc 2 delayed action (1 x 1000kg; 1 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg; 1 x 12kg AP); 18 anti-personnel bombs.

(1) The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

(2)  Normally made with scrambled eggs, tomatoes and onion

(3)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Malta, 1981

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on September 12, 2012 in 1942, August 1942, Uncategorized

 

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