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4-10 October 1942: Luftwaffe Gather in Sicily

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4 October 1942: 69 Squadron Rob Rommel

HEROIC RESCUE

Filfla

Quick thinking by a pilot of 227 Squadron today saved the life of an RAF observer whose aircraft had ditched in the sea near the Island of Filfla.  Pilot Officer Briffet was observer on one of nine Beaufighters recalled early from a mission to attack an enemy convoy.  The Beaufighter suddenly lost power and ditched into the sea killing the pilot, WO 2 George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force.

Four Beaufighters 227 Squadron were sent to locate the ditched aircraft and search for survivors.  RCAF Flight Lieutenant Dallas Schmidt spotted P/O Briffet struggling in the sea and threw down his own dinghy, tied to his ‘Mae West’ life jacket.  Briffet, who was unhurt, managed to swim to the dinghy and scrambled aboard to await rescue.

Meanwhile one of the four Beaufighters developed engine trouble and was forced to land on the sea near the dinghy.  The crew were picked up unhurt by the High Speed Launch, along with P/O Briffet.

MESSAGE FROM AOC MEDITERRANEAN TO 69 SQUADRON

“Grand work 69 Squadron.  Your attack by Fishingtons last night on a 6000 ton merchant vessel was clearly an unqualified success and probably robbed Rommel of yet another important ship.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 OCTOBER TO DAWN 5 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine; lightning late evening.

0830-0905 hrs  20 enemy fighters approach the Island at great height but few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Spitfires engage the enemy; one is reported missing in combat.  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth’s aircraft is observed leaking Glycol as he crash lands at Qrendi.  The aircraft hits an obstruction on landing, seriously injuring F/Sgt Hogarth.  He is taken to hospital but later dies from his injuries.

0940-1025 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1600-1945 hrs  Three Beaufighters 227 Squadron carry out searches for the dinghy of a missing Beaufighter: nothing sighted.

2003-0414 hrs  One Wellington 69 Squadron carries out searches for the Beaufighter dinghy: flares and flame floats were dropped but nothing was sighted.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron, RAF; Warrant Officer II George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force, 227 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Irving Gass, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 249 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 4 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clocks retarded 1 hour to Zone – 1.  Rorqual and P 43 sailed. Una and P 42 arrived.

AIR HQ  Nine Beaufighters despatched to attack convoy.  All aircraft recalled early.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons, one Mosquito to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron missing.  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron crash-landed.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance from Taranto to Cape Maria de Leuca at 1305 sighted one 5000 ton merchant vessel, three destroyers and one large float plane.  1925-0315 hrs  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron, two carrying flares and two torpedoes, were despatched to locate and attack enemy convoy which was not located.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Number of personnel in hospital as a result of food poisoning has now risen to 60.

5 October 1942: Malta Sees Signs of Renewed Attacks

ME 109s in Sicily

Fighter pilots have been returning from intruder and reconnaissance missions over Sicily in recent days with reports of a build-up of Axis air forces on the Island.  This evidence, added to the increased numbers of fighters in offensive sweeps over Malta, has increased concerns that the enemy may be planning a major attack.  Today a Spitfire of 69 Squadron was despatched to make a detailed photographic reconnaissance of Trapani, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata which will be carefully examined by Air Command.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 OCTOBER TO DAWN 6 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Mostly fine to fair; slight showers in the morning.  Lightning early morning and late evening.

0805-0900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on interception and to act as cover for 249 Squadron: no enemy aircraft seen.

0925-1110 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept a raid of four ME 109s but see no enemy aircraft.

1325-1600 hrs  Ta Qali provides a standing patrol of two Spitfires over the High Speed Launch retruning to Grand Harbour: no enemy seen.

1413-1444 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy fighters which approach to within six miles of the Island and then recede.  One crosses the coast east of Delimara.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but there are no engagements.

2056-2123 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the north east of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea before receding.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Detachment Luqa are scrambled to intercept but see no enemy aircraft.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 5 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 and Parthian swept out by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Beaufort, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron force landed in the sea: crew rescued unhurt.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released all day.

LUQA  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron were airborne on interception and made a reconnaissance patrol of the Cape Passero-Comiso area but saw no enemy aircraft.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron make a photographic reconnaissance of Trapin, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata.

TA QALI  0720-0835 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.   1120-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: nothing sighted.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  B Company are carrying out coast patrol and Tal Virtu Observation Post duties for this week.

6 October 1942: Malta Infantry Prepare for Large Scale Ops

A major military exercise took place this morning at Mellieha involving Malta’s infantry troops.  The exercise, organised by 2 Brigade, started at 9 this morning and included a demonstration of Artillery operations on a large scale.  Troops taking part were members of 2 Brigade Artillery Group, 23rd Field Battery Royal Artillery, 49/91 Field Battery Royal Artillery, 1 Troop 48/71 Defence Battery Royal Artillery and 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Military leaders explained the object of demonstration which was to give Infantry troops experience in carrying out an attack under their own Artillery fire and to show the flexibility of Artillery fire.  The exercise was followed immediately by a demonstration of Allied and enemy weapons at Ghain Tuffieha.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 OCTOBER TO DAWN 7 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0950-1019 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers: one drops bombs 40 miles north of Malta, the remainder drop bombs in the sea four miles north of Gozo.  Their escort of 24 enemy fighters approaches the Island at 23000 feet; only six cross the coast.  Malta fighters dive to attack a formation of eight ME 109s which take violent evasive action and manage to escape.  Two other ME 109s are engaged; 1435 Squadron P/O Lattimer damages one; Sgt Phillips’ aircraft is slightly damaged.

1820 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regiment report a white verey light eight miles out to sea due north of Della Grazia.

2158-2220 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft, none of which cross the coast: bombs are dropped in the sea.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  They pursue one raider but are unable to overtake it.

Military casualties  Lance Bombardier Ronald Harris, 12 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery; Gunner Emmanuel Pirotta, 11 HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery, died of wounds inflicted by enemy aircraft; Private John Vella, 3rd Battalion, King’s Own Malta Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 6 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde arrived from Gibraltar with petrol and stores and P 44 from patrol, both being swept in by Rye. Clyde berths in Grand Harbour. P 44 reported having torpedoed a ship which had been beached after attack by Royal Air Force.

AIR HQ  Four Spitfire sorties on offensive recce Sicily.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Douglas from LG 224.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Douglas to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged: pilot unhurt.

HAL FAR  1515-1650 hrs  Five Spitfires carried out a reconnaissance sweep over south east Sicily.  One enemy aircraft is seen at deck level south of Biscari.

LUQA  2205-2217 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron patrols over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.

TA QALI  0725-0825 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.

7 October 1942: Victory Kitchens Threatened With Closure

Victory Kitchen

A Government Select Committee has recommended today that Victory Kitchens should be closed.  The recommendation is the conclusion of an investigation into the emergency food provision commissioned in September.  The study was launched following severe criticism in the press, both in editorial and letters sections, of the quality of food service in Victory Kitchens.

The Committee reported a lack of uniformity in taste or quantity and slated the cooks, citing examples of food being over or undercooked, even sometimes burnt or left raw.  Supervisors were also heavily criticised, with suggestions that few were up to the job.  The Committee’s recommendation for closure included the suggestion that instead all produce be distributed to the population via their rations.

The Government has issued a statement in response, questioning the basis for some of the Committee’s findings.  They rejected the proposal to issue food direct to the public on the basis that this would disadvantage those less able to pay a premium for produce.  However, it is accepted that the expansion of Victory Kitchen users from 20000 in August to some 100,000 today has created problems.  Urgent measures will be taken to address allegations in the report of poor cooking, wastage and pilfering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 OCTOBER TO DAWN 8 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0745-0845 hrs  Air raid alert for 18 ME 109s which approach the Island at a great height: few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and locate the enemy but the raiders have the advantage of height so there is no combat.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa attempt to intercept three enemy fighters but the raiders turn back before they can be engaged.

1011-1047 hrs  Three Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled along with aircraft from another Squadron to intercept 23 plus enemy fighters approaching the Island.  The Spitfires are unable to catch the enemy.

1458-1525 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 enemy fighters in a sweep, of which only three cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled but see nothing.

Military casualties  Private Joseph Pisani, 1st Malta Pioneer Group, Malta Territorial Force.

Civilian casualties  Naxxar  Teodoro Azzopardi, age 23.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 7 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise swept in from sea by Speedy, P 35 swept out by Beryl.

LUQA  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicily: nothing sighted.  1512 hrs  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance sights a convoy of two merchant vessels off Palermo.  Spitfires of 69 Squadron also make photographic reconnaissance.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 1-7 October the Battalion has found two lorries, one motor-cycle and five other ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  Two twin Lewis guns have been manned during the hours of daylight on Safi Strip for anti-aircraft defence.

8 October 1942: 9000 Houses Destroyed, 17000 Damaged

VALUE OF SHELTERS DEMONSTRATED IN MALTA  London, Thursday 8 October 1942

12 miles of tunnels dug for shelters

To the end of July more than 1300 Maltese had been killed in air-raids and 1600 seriously injured.  About 9,000 houses had been destroyed and 17,000 damaged. The Lieut.-Governor Sir Edward Jackson, who is now in London, in giving these figures added that the comparatively small number of casualties was because every man, woman and child had a safe shelter. The providing of this had necessitated 12 miles of tunnels and 18 months had been occupied in digging out shelters.

Lady Jackson said that the people of Malta were devoutly religious. The scene in a larger shelter during a raid was not likely to be forgotten. It was packed and in almost complete darkness, with a tiny candle in front of the Shrine. The sound of bombs was deadened by the prayers. They were not praying for themselves, but for the sailors, the pilots in the skies and the men behind the anti-aircraft guns…

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 OCTOBER TO DAWN 9 OCTOBER 1942

0807-0912 hrs  Air raid alert for one enemy aircraft which approaches to within 20 miles of the Island and then recedes.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1012-1047 hrs  Fifteen enemy fighters approach at between 22000 and 27000 feet, with another patrol of six ME 109s which cross the Island on reconnaissance.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1313-1328 hrs  Air raid alert for three ME 109s which cross the coast at 24000 feet before receding north.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1604-1636 hrs  Eight ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet and recede south of Filfla.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1830 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a light 4-5 miles out to sea.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Clyde to sea, destined for Beirut with passengers and cargo.

9 October 1942: Maltese Warned Against Black Market

INFORMATION OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

What do I do…about the Black Market?

  1. I refuse to buy from profiteers.
  2. I report to the Police anyone who tries to charge me more than the lawful price for a controlled article.
  3. I combine with my friends to boycott known profiteers.
  4. I go without a thing, rather than encourage profiteering by buying at an excessive price.
  5. I do all I can amongst the people I meet to form a body of opinion which condemns profiteering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 OCTOBER TO DAWN 10 OCTOBER 1942

1022-1048 hrs  11 ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet over St Paul’s Bay and recede north east of Zonqor.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

2058-2100 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft proved to be friendly.

Military casualties  Lance-Bombardier John (Carmelo) Bondin, 11th HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery; Aircraftsman Arthur Robbins, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 212 arrived to join 10th Submarine Flotilla.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photographic reconnaissance of Patras.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Battalion bugles marched the George Cross into Rabat where it was placed on view to the public.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  1730 hrs Battalion Beat the Retreat in Castille Square.

10 October 1942: Bombers Return – 15 Killed, 30 Injured in Gozo

EYE-WITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE TRAGEDY – click here

JU 88 bombers

Bombers were reported in the skies over the Maltese Archipelago in broad daylight this morning – for the first time in seven weeks.

Reconnaissance reports over recent days have provided clear evidence that the Axis are building up a large striking force in Sicily.  Photographs show some 600 aircraft across the Island’s airfields.  Indications are that a third of the Luftwaffe in the Mediterranean, and half their bomber strength, is now concentrated in Sicily.  The inevitable conclusion is that Axis high command has demanded reprisals for the successful raids on their supply convoys to North Africa.  As the air and submarine base for those attacks, Malta is now braced for further mass air attacks.

MOTHER’S COURAGE

Inez Portelli received a message that her daughter, who was staying at Inez’s sister’s house in Rabat, had been taken ill.  She set off on foot to take sugar and milk to her daughter; her son insisted on going with her.  Inez arrived to find, to her surprise, that her sister had taken her sick daughter to church:

“This appeared very strange to me because I was expecting to find my daughter in bed.  In the meantime there was an air raid alert and I hurried with my son and my brother-in-law to get cover in the nearest shelter.

Before I had gone down two or three steps, a terrific explosion sent us all reeling.  Suddenly all was confusion.  Panic-stricken people were screaming and running aimlessly around and as I looked out I saw people lying on the ground, motionless, while others were crawling away or writhing in agony and moaning.  My arm had been nearly torn away but I did not feel any pain.  My brother-in-law took one look at me and fainted.  I was laid on a stretcher and taken to [hospital]…I was taken into the operating theatre and when I came to in the morning I realised that my arm had gone.

Later on in the morning the hospital chaplain administered the Last Sacraments to me and I knew that there was little hope for me; I was so shocked that I begged them to let me die but the chaplain gently asked me whether I had any children.  ‘Yes, four,’ I said.  Then he said, ‘You will still be able to look after your children somehow with one arm but if you are not there anything could happen to them.’  Those words struck home and I was determined to go back to the family.” (2)

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING 10 OCTOBER 1942

1.  Considerable increase in enemy air activity at the weekend.  4-9 October total 123 fighter sorties in sweeps of 15 aircraft.  10 October total approximately 120 planes including eight JU 88s.  Two JU 88s dropped bombs on Gozo: 10 civilians killed, 30 wounded.  Two ME 109 destroyed, two probably destroyed, six damaged by fighters.  Ack Ack no claims.  Photo reconnaissance shows further increases – now a total of 531 aircraft including 122 JU 88s in Sicily.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 OCTOBER TO DAWN 11 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; cloudless early morning.

0730-0901 hrs  40 ME 109s flying in various formations cross the coast at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne and engage, damaging one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands; the pilot is unhurt.

0932-0935 hrs  Air raid alert for fifteen ME 109s which fly at 29000 feet over Gozo and then over the south of Malta, eventually receding north.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and locate the raiders which avoid combat.

1041-1119 hrs  Air raid alert: two JU 88s accompanied by 45 fighters approach Gozo from the north.  Malta Spitfires are scrambled to intercept and engage the bombers which jettison their bomb loads on Sannat, Gozo, demolishing 15 houses, killing 15 civilians and injuring 30 more.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta Spitfires destroy one ME 109, probably destroy two and damage three.  One Spitfire is slightly damaged in combat.

1348-1414 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 46 enemy fighters which turn away before the Spitfires can catch them.

1544-1623 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron are scrambled with aircraft of other Squadrons to intercept 30 plus enemy aircraft including six JU 88s which approach the Island.  The raiders evade the Spitfires and escape towards Sicily.

Night  Three alerts for a total of 10 aircraft of which only six cross the coast.  Flares are used over the Island.  Bombs are dropped in the areas of Gozo, Luqa and Dingli.

Military casualties  Aircraftsman John Pitt, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Gozo (Sannat)  Michael Azzopardi, age 6 mths; Joseph Cini, age 50; Saviour Curmi, age 80; Pauline Farrugia, age 70; Josephine Galea, age 30; Michael Galea, age 8; Margaret Galea, age 6; Joseph Galea, age 4; Grazia Muscat, age 50; Mary Muscat, age 30; Frances Pace, age 45; Catherine Saliba, age 35; Mary Tabone, age 17; Carmela Theuma, age 64; Lydia Zammit, age 2.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 10 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise sailed being swept out by Hythe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar; one Liberator from LG 224.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort missing in transit from Gibraltar to Malta.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

10thACK ACK BRIGADE, ROYAL ARTILLERY  Order issued detailing move of GL set to Gozo.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 9.  Dealt with: High Explosives 4 (1 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg); anti-personnel bombs 20.

(1)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Ltd, Malta 1981

(2)  The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

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20-26 September 1942: Malta Forces Subdue Luftwaffe and Rommel

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20 September 1942: George Cross Presented to People of Gozo

Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

A ceremony was held today in Victoria to formally present the George Cross to the People of Gozo.  The counterpart to last Sunday’s Valletta presentation ceremony was held at It Tokk.  All the sister Island’s leading dignitaries were present including Monsignor Gonzi and Mr George Ransley, the Commissioner for Gozo.

MALTA’S MAIN CONCERN STILL LACK OF SUPPLIES

From:  Governor (General Viscount Gort)  To:  Secretary of State for the Colonies

1.  During the month ended 20th September there were 59 alerts; 38 by day and 21 by night.  9 bombing raids; nil by day, 9 by night.  9 people were killed (4 men, 1 woman, 4 children); 11 were seriously injured (4 men, 3 women, 4 children).  15 houses were seriously damaged.

2.  The principal concern of the Government remains the control and the even distribution of commodities, both local and imported.  Apart from this, the main events of the period were the departure of Sir Edward Jackson and Locker and the arrival of Campbell as Acting Lieutenant-Governor.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 21 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

No air raids.

1100-1230 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1702-1811 hrs  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far on patrol over the Island: nothing seen.

1715-1835 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Captain James Golding, Royal Army Pay Corps.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Surface plots were reported 15 miles off Grand Harbour, but faded by 0200 without having been confirmed.

AIR HQ  Twelve Spitfires carried out offensive recce over Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily attacked a ship 300 yards offshore near Licata.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One DC 3 to LG 224.

HAL FAR  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron arrived as Ta Qali was under repair.

21 September 1942: Malta RAF is Helping Win the War, Says Air Marshal

The Air Officer Commanding, Malta has received the following letter from Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Trenhard:

“I am writing you a line to say that I had hoped to have come and visit you on my way to the Middle East.  I shall fly very near you but not come down as I am told every aeroplane is of value to take you supplies, and not to use your petrol.  Under the circumstances you will realise that I must agree to this but I am sorry from my own point of view.

B flight 249 Squadron July 42 (1)

I would like to congratulate you most heartily on what you are doing in Malta.  It is magnificent.  The Air Forces are great.  It is wonderful what they have done.  They have saved the situation everywhere and are pressing on with their work which will anyhow eventually be the great instrument for winning this war.

I do congratulate you also on the wonderful spirit that exists in Malta both in the Army and in the Air Force.  I am told, and believe it thoroughtly, that all work as one and I congratulate you and your staff, all the pilots, the maintenance crews and everyone.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 21 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 22 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

1108-1136 hrs  Air raid alert.  Twelve enemy aircraft approach and observers detect and report a possible bombing raid.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled from Hal Far to intercept but do not engage.  The attack develops into a small fighter sweep with few aircraft crossing the coast.  Malta’s fighters are airborne: no engagements.

1405-1505 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are airborne on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1830-1930 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron carry out anti E boat patrol of the Sicilian coast: nothing sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  With a view to eliminate the sharp turn in QBB 273 off Zonkor Point, and provide a transit line into Grand Harbour, Speedy, Hebe and Hythe carried out a clearance sweep of the small area of unswept water near Position 2, and also a strip four cables inshore of the inshore edge of the new leg of the proposed new channel.  One anti sweeping device was cut and sunk by rifle fire.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Wellington from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  1700-1821 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron carried out offensive reconnaissance over south east Sicily: no enemy activity.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  HQ Company fired machine-guns at Pembroke Range.  Battalion swimming competition vs 1st Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.  Bn won the swimming events but 1st Bn KOMR beat us at water polo.

22 September 1942: George Cross Starts Tour of Malta

GC ARRIVES IN DINGLI

George Cross Display

The George Cross medal awarded to Malta was today taken to the village of Dingli, carried by the Inspector of Police with a small police guard.  Twelve buglers of the 1st Bn Durham Light Infantry played as the George Cross was carried in procession from the outskirts of the village to the church and placed on a plinth so that villagers could view it.  At the end of the ceremony, the Army buglers heralded the medal’s departure.

To recognise the endurance of the people of Malta, the George Cross will continue its tour to all parts of the Island, including Cottonera, Luqa, Marsa, Mellieha, Mgarr, Mosta, Mqabba, Empire Stadium, Paola, Qrendi, Siggiewi, Sliema, Rabat, Zabbar, Zebbug, Zurrieq, Safi, Senglea, Zejtun and Gharghur.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 23 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0845-0910 hrs  Air raid alert. Two ME 109s, believed to be on weather reconnaissance, approach to within six miles of the coast at 30,000 feet.  Malta’s fighters are airborne; no engagements.

1015-1130 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far patrol over the Island: nothing seen.

1215-1245 hrs  Air raid alert.  18 enemy fighters approach the Gozo to St Paul’s Bay area at 25000 feet.  Nine Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept patrol: no engagement.

1835-1935 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on anti E boat patrol: nothing sighted.

2300-0310 hrs  One Swordfish from Hal Far carries out two anti E boat patrols: nothing sighted.

2305 hrs  Beach Company, 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regt is warned to look out for a Beaufighter which might force-land into the sea.

2351-0039 hrs  Five enemy aircraft approach, three of which cross the coast.  Two are definitely identified as JU 87s.  They drop 250kg bombs on Qrendi and on Delimara Heavy Ack Ack position, where there is one slight casualty.  Other bombs are dropped in the sea south of Ta Silch and north of St Paul’s Bay.  Searchlights illuminate one aircraft and Heavy Ack Ack fire: no claims.

0023 hrs  A hostile shipping plot is reported ten miles off Grand Harbour.  Beach Companies Kings Own Malta Regiment are warned and Coastal Defences are ordered to open fire if necessary.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant James Burrett, Royal Australian Air Force;Sergeant William Doodson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR);Flying Officer Aubrey Izzard, Royal Canadian Air Force; Flying Officer Ralph Jones, RAF VR; all 39 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 1942

HMS Proteus

ROYAL NAVY  The new channel QBB 288 was declared open.  Speedy swept Proteus into harbour.  Swona swept to Marsaxlokk and back.  3rd ML Flotilla swept area to NE commenced on 15th and 16th but had to abandon the operation after 4 hours owing to the weather. 6 moored mines were cut.  Swona carried out SA and LL sweep of Marsaxlokk and approaches and also of QBB 273.  Hythe swept P 35 to sea and P 46 in from patrol. She reported having sunk a schooner and two merchant vessels.

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out offensive recces over Sicily: no enemy sighted.  Nine Beauforts and seven Beaufighters despatched to attack enemy convoy of one tanker escorted by three destroyers.  One, possibly two hits on tanker.  One Beaufort missing, one Beaufighter damaged.

Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort damaged by accompanying Beaufighter and crashed into the sea: crew missing.  One Beaufighter crashed into Beaufort while on operations: crew uninjured.  One Beaufighter damaged by enemy action crashed while attempting to land: crew slightly injured.

HAL FAR  1505-1610 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron patrol south east Sicily: nothing seen.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  C Company started their three day march.  Left billets at 0800 hrs, arrived at Mellieha Bay about 1215 hrs – distance about 13 miles.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  All Companies in the Battalion except C Coy began classification firing at Ghain Tuffieha.

23 September 1942: RAF Aircraft in Fatal Mid-Air Collision

The crew of a Malta based Beaufort were killed last night when their aircraft was in collision with a Beaufighter during an attack on an enemy convoy.  The Beaufort of 39 Squadron was one of nine sent with seven Beaufighters of 227 Squadron to target a 6000 ton tanker with three destroyers as escort, ten miles west of Antipaxos.  They reached their target as daylight was failing.

Beaufort 39 Squadron before take-off at Luqa

Two Beaufighters raked the leading destroyers with cannon fire, causing a small explosion on one, and succeeding in their objective of drawing the flak away from the torpedo-carrying Beauforts which attacked the tanker from port and starboard.  Eight torpedoes were released, scoring one definite hit and one possible hit on the tanker and causing an explosion.  Black smoke would be seen two miles away.  The other Beaufighters drove off three JU 88s accompanying the convoy.

During the mission one Beaufort collided with a Beaufighter and crashed into the sea.  The Beaufort crew are reported missing, presumed dead.  They have been named as Flight Sergeant James Burrett, Sergeant William Doodson, Flying Officer Aubrey Izzard and Flying Officer Ralph Jones; all 39 Squadron.

The Beaufighter remained airborne but late last night Malta’s coastal defences were warned to keep a look out for the damaged aircraft which might force-land into the sea.  The Beaufighter made it back to base but crashed while attempting to land, causing slight injuries to the crew.

Later in the night six Wellingtons of 69 Squadron found the convoy again, this time 33 miles south west of Antipaxos.  The destroyers attempted to lay a smoke screen, but this was blown away by the wind.  The Wellingtons dropped twenty 500lb bombs dropped, some of which fell within 15 yards of the port side of the tanker.  According to reconnaissance photographs taken at first light the tanker has been forced to take refuge in Patras Harbour.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 23 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 24 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

AM  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are despatched on air sea rescue to 35 miles north of Grand Harbour but find nothing.

0958-1143 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept patrol (two return early): no sightings.  Four more patrol 30 miles north of the Island: no sightings.

1055-1135 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept two enemy aircraft but develop radio trouble and return to base: nothing sighted.

1350-1409 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and climb to 20000 feet over Grand Harbour before flying at 14000 feet to within ten miles of the Sicilian coast: nothing seen.

1605-1710 hrs  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

0005-0030 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers, none of which cross the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea off Delimara.  One is engaged by 4th Bn Heavy Ack Ack Regt.  The enemy raider shoots down the searchlight beams with his machine gun.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer Ian Preston, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  1845-2205 hrs  Two Beaufighters are despatched on intruder patrol: one shoots up E boats and submarines moored at Trapani.  The other shoots up a seaplane station.

Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beaufighters to Abu Sueir.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire believed damaged by enemy fighters: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  1740-1850 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron carried out a sweep of south east Sicily: enemy aircraft reported but not seen.  2300-0325 hrs  One Swordfish RNAS carried out two anti E boat offensive patrols: nothing seen.

TA QALI  Aerodrome was unserviceable while new drainage system was being installed across the centre of the landing ground.  229 Squadron detachment operated from Luqa.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Company fired on F Range Pembroke: results very good.

24 September 1942: Malta Bombers Praised for Strike Against Rommel

MESSAGE FROM AIR OFFICE COMMANDING READS

Beaufighter as flown by 227 Squadron

“Well done again 227 Squadron.  Your successful bombing of a merchant vessel on September 17th has deprived Rommel of yet another ship carrying important supplies.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 25 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0800-0835 hrs  Air raid alert for seven ME 109s approaching the Island.  Nine Spitfires 249 Squadron (one spare returned early) are scrambled to intercept.  Blue Section sights four ME 109s but lose them in the sun.  Red Section report no sightings.  Only three enemy raiders cross the coast at 27000 feet.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds: no claims.

1025-1055 hrs  Air raid alert as nine ME 109s approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept with no sightings.  Six enemy raiders cross the coast at 23-270000 feet.  Malta’s fighters are airborne and engage.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

1705-1720 hrs  Air raid alert for six enemy fighters which cross the coast and carry out a fighter sweep from Gozo to Kalafrana.  Four Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: nothing sighted.

1900 hrs  One Spitfire returning from Luqa is damaged on landing: pilot P/O Williams is uninjured.

Military casualties  Major Douglas Armstrong, 57 Field Hygiene Section, Royal Army Medical Corps.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Proteus sailed for Gibraltar, being swept out by Hebe.

AIR HQ  Two Beauforts of 39 Squadron made their first night torpedo attack on a convoy of three destroyers, one small unidentified naval vessel and a 5/6000 ton merchant vessel, which was coast crawling northwards, ten miles north of Point Stile.  Two torpedoes were dropped but although they were seen to run well the results could not be observed, as the aircraft had to fly into the moon on leaving the target.  One Hurricane and two Beaufighters carried out intruder patrols over Sicily.  Arrivals  Three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  0625-0755 hrs  Ten Spitfires made a reconnaissance sweep over south east Sicily: no enemy activity.

TA QALI  1735-1900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron and nine of 249 Squadron (one of each Squadron returned early) on Rodeo raids.  P/O Beurling 249 Squadron sighted one unidentified enemy aircraft: no combat.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Company fired machine-guns on F range Pembroke.  C Coy marched back from Mellieha, arrived at billets about 1330 hrs.  B & D Coys held a night exercise.

25 September 1942: Luftwaffe Fighters Flee in Face of Spitfires

US AIR FORCE LIBERATORS ATTACK BENGHAZI – MALTA RECONNAISSANCE PILOTS REPORT SUCCESS

Port of Benghazi before attacks

Photographs taken of Benghazi by Malta reconnaissance pilots have revealed the success of a recent raid by US air force Liberators.  A 7000 ton merchant vessel which had been unloading in the port has clearly been blown to pieces, together with most of the improvised jetty at which she was moored.  The destruction of the jetty has reduced by half the wharfage available to the enemy for unloading large ships at Benghazi.  Another 7000 ton ship was also reported to be damaged.

BEAT THE RETREAT

At dusk this evening, Castile Square echoed to the moving tradition of Beat the Retreat, by the band and drums of 2nd Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment.  The ceremony at 1800 hrs was performed before the General Officer Commanding, Malta and other dignitaries, plus many onlookers who gathered to enjoy the moment.  A brief air raid alert at 1750 hrs threatened to disrupt proceedings but the yellow flag only was raised over the Castile and it was decided to continue with the parade.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 25 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine: visibility good – slight early morning haze.

1115-1145 hrs  Air raid alert for twelve ME 109s approaching the Island. Ten Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and encounter the raiders 35 miles north east of Grand Harbour.  They destroy two ME 109s and damage one.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands: the pilot is uninjured.

1750-1815 hrs  Air raid alert.  17 ME 109s approach to within 10 miles of Gozo.  Malta fighters see the enemy but are unable to engage as the raiders flee northwards to avoid conflict.

Night  No alerts.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                         Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 arrived from Gibraltar to join 10th S/M Flotilla and was swept into harbour by Hebe.  P 34 sailed for the United Kingdom, and P 42 and Una on patrol, all being swept out by Hebe.  Weather unsuitable for air operations.

AIR HQ  Three Beaufighters despatched to attack a minesweeper in the area Kuriat to Sfax.  Target not located.  One Cant 506 B destroyed.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Five Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC 3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crash landed due to enemy action: pilot uninjured.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

TA QALI  0645-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol sight barges loaded with sacks but do not attack.  1530-1630 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance cross the Sicilian coast: no sightings.

26 September 1942: Malta Attacks Enemy Tanker, Merchantmen, Destroyers and Subs

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  The War Office        Rptd:  C in C Middle East

1.  Enemy air: Six alerts daylight for total 83 aircraft – high fighter sweeps: two ME 109s destroyed, one ME 109 damaged.  Seven aircraft approached Bight, four crossed coast, bombs Qrendi and Delimara areas.

2.  Own air:  Day (A) Nine Beauforts, seven Beaufighters attacked tanker escorted by three destroyers.  One, possibly two, hits on tanker.  One Beaufort missing, one Beaufighter damaged.  (B)  Three Beaufighters despatched to attack minesweeper: target not located.  One Cant 506B destroyed.  (C)  Over 100 Spitfire sorties offensive reconnaissance Sicily.  One ME 109 destroyed, one probably destroyed, without loss.

Night  (A)  Six Wellingtons attacked tanker: stick of bombs within 15 yards.  (B)  Three Beauforts attacked 5/6000 ton merchant vessel escorted by three destroyers: results not seen.  (C)  Total five Beaufighters, one Hurricane, on intruder patrols Sicily: E boats and submarines Trapani and small ship off Licata machine-gunned.

3.  General: Approximately 450 soldiers daily detailed to assist RAF.

4.  Military casualties and damage: one officer wounded last April now died; one other rank slight casualty.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 26 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 27 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Weather fine; visibility good.

0910-1030 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept a report of approaching enemy aircraft.  The raid does not materialise and no raiders are seen.

1040-1130 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1735-1835 hrs  Ten Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept enemy aircraft (two return early with radio trouble).  The raiders retreat before they are seen.

2005-2035 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy bombers approaching the Island; only one crosses the coast and is illuminated by searchlights for 3 ¾ minutes.  All bombs are dropped in the sea.

Military casualties  Gunner Joseph Pulis, 11th AA, Royal Malta Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY Hebe swept Utmost in from patrol and then proceeded to Dockyard for retubing of boilers. P 211 sailed, being swept out by Hythe.  A report of a fire in the Dockyard area turns out to be a crashed bomber (identified as friendly).

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out offensive recces over Sicily.  One ME 109 destroyed, one probably destroyed.  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Castel Vetrano: no sightings.  Arrivals  One Spitifre from LG 28.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed on landing: pilot uninjured.  One Beaufighter engine failure: crew injured.

TA QALI  1345-1435 hrs  Three Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol cross the Sicilian coast over Comiso: no sightings.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 24.  Dealt with: 6 High Explosives (2 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg;); 1 anti-personnel container; 18 anti-personnel bombs; 9 oil incendiaries.

(1) Canadian Air Aces and Heroes, WWI, WWII and Korea

 

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Posted by on September 26, 2017 in 1942, September 1942

 

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5 July 1941: Troops Deployed to Defend Gozo From Invasion

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Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

GOZO DEFENCE SCHEME IN PLACE

Troops of 1st Bn Hampshire Regiment have been issued with detailed orders to prepare for a possible invasion of Gozo.  The strategy is designed to counter enemy seaborne landings at Marsalforn, Mgarr and Cala Dueira, and to prevent airborne landings in the area Xaghra-Nadur-Xewkija-Rabat. 

In the event of a seaborne landing at Marsalforn, one Company will cover its southern exits and occupy Il Kortin ta Gjain Damma. Another company based at Il Mirzuk will prevent the enemy from using the road between Marsalforn and Rabat.  One Company will be located in Mgarr against a possible seaborne landing there and another will occupy a key point of approach to the town.  To defend Cala Dueira one Company will cover the area of Torri tal Qawra and another Tad Bieji.   

To counter airborne landings troops will be based at Rabat, Xaghra, Nadur and Xewkija and there will be ten additional coast watches at key points around the Island.  In addition, should no orders be received, Company Commanders will use their initiative in dealing with any enemy landings which are not in their areas of primary responsibility.

SECOND AIRCRAFT CRASH IN TWO DAYS

A Blenheim aircraft crashed today within seconds of taking off from Luqa aerodrome. The Blenheim was barely airborne when it suddenly lost height and crashed near Gudja military camp.  Two of the crew were killed on impact, two others were rescued from the burning plane.  The Blenheim which was leaving for the UK was completely burned out.  A guard was mounted on the remains by 1st Bn Hampshire Regiment until RAF salvage operations could be completed. 

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 JULY TO DAWN 6 JULY 1941

Weather  Hot and sunny.

Night  Four air raid alerts during which in all ten enemy aircraft pass over the Island, seven of which drop bombs in the sea.  The other three dropped bombs on and near Mosta, in Lija cemetery and in fields near Zeitun and Birkirkara.  Hurricanes are scrambled five times and anti-aircraft guns fire several barrages; no claims.  

2243-2300 hrs; 2321-0034 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy aircraft which approaches from the north east and drops bombs in the sea west of Kalafrana.  Searchlights illuminate the raider for two minutes and eight heavy anti-aircraft guns fire a barrage at 18000 feet; no claims.

0113-0133 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy aircraft which crosses the coast north of Grand Harbour and drops bombs near Ta Qali.

0151-0309 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft approaching the Island singly from the north and drop bombs in the sea off St Thomas’ Bay, near Kalafrana, and on land near Ta Qali. Searchlights illuminate the targets for 2¼ minutes.  Anti-aircraft guns fire a barrage at aircraft south of Kalafrana; they immediately recede east and then northwards.

Military casualties Sergeant Alfred D F Murcutt, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 82 Squadron; Sergeant Jack Oaten, Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, RAFVR, 82 Squadron.

Civilian casualties Hamrun  Ines Serra, age 15; Nello Serra, age 13; Aldo Serra, age 10; Carmelina Serra, age 5; Carmel Grima, age 44; Emanuel Sammut, age 16; Emanuel Sultana, age 40; Pauline Verzin, age 70.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 5 JULY 1941

AIR HQ  Departures 5 Blenheim 82 Squadron. 69 Squadron  Marylands reconnaissance Sciacca, Castel Vetrano, Syracuse, Augusta, Gela, Tripoli and special patrols. 110 Squadron 4 Blenheims searched for reported ship without success. 

LUQA  5 Blenheims 82 Squadron left for Middle East, one crashed on Gudja, killing 2 and injuring 2.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 1.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  The Battalion will move to Gozo for a 3 week training course starting on 15 July.

 

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Posted by on July 5, 2016 in 1941, July 1941

 

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20 March 1941: German Forces Preparing to Invade Gozo

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Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

Citadel, Victoria, Gozo

INVASION BATTALION GATHERS IN SICILY

Information has been received by Malta high command that Gozo is the expected landing point for an enemy invasion. Reliable intelligence sources have confirmed that a German landing battalion with full boat and ferry equipment is heading for the central Mediterranean.  The force is expected to arrive on 26 March and to be ready for use ten days later.  There are also reported to be a number of flat-bottomed boats in Sicily of the type used for landing troops.  The quantity does not seem sufficient for a landing on Malta but it is thought a landing may be attempted on Gozo.

It is believed the enemy is preparing to carry out a reconnaissance of Gozo on the basis that the Island is undefended, and that therefore a raid on a small scale might be possible. In response, senior military officers from Malta including Administration, Royal Artillery, Royal Irish Fusiliers, Malta Tank Troop and Fortress Royal Engineers are making their own reconnaissance visit to Gozo prior to making suitable provision to defend the Island from invasion.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 MARCH TO DAWN 21 MARCH 1941

Weather  Fair.

1223-1243 hrs  Air raid alert for three approaching enemy fighters which do not come near the coast. Hurricane fighters are scrambled but the enemy does not approach near enough to make attack necessary.

1510-1542 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy ME 110 fighter which machine-guns a Dockyard tug off Zonqor. Anti-aircraft guns open fire and the raider is chased off by Hurricanes.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 20 MARCH 1941

AIR HQ 69 Squadron 1005-1325 hrs  Maryland patrolled between Pantelleria, Cape Bon and Sicily for shipping information; convoy notified to Naval authorities.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The CO took officers and men to reconnoitre positions for the mobile machine-gun company.

 

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Posted by on March 20, 2016 in 1941, March 1941

 

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1 December 1940: Aircraft Losses Since June – Malta 4, Italy 49

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AIR RAID SUMMARY NOVEMBER 1940

  • No of raids 32
  • Days without air raids 13
  • Total time under alert 15 hrs 10 mins
  • Average length of alert 28½ mins
  • Number of Malta aircraft lost since June 1940: 4
  • Number of enemy aircraft destroyed since June 1940: 24 confirmed; 25 probable

AIR RAIDS DAWN 1 DECEMBER TO DAWN 2 DECEMBER 1940

Weather  Cold and wet.

No air raids.

floriana barracks bwOPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 1 DECEMBER 1940 

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Fortress Royal Engineers re-organised to comprise 24 Fortress Company RE and Nos 1 and 2 Works Companies Malta Territorial Force (Embodied).  No 1 Bomb Disposal Section formed of NCOs and men of 24 Fortress Coy RE.  Personnel of this Section have been trained in bomb disposal work by Bomb Disposal Officer S/Lt E E Talbot, RE.

24 Fortress Company RE and HQ Fortress Royal Engineers vacated Casemate Barracks and occupied Lintorn Barracks.  No 2 Works Company employed on building accommodation for 2nd Bn Manchester Regt and Ack Ack searchlight station and section HQ at Bajda.  No 1 Works Company began work on a cookhouse at Zeitun School.  Two sections of No 1 Company are permanently accommodated at Marsaxlokk and two of No 2 Company at Ghain Tuffieha for work in those areas.

ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS  Unloading of ammunition from SS Clan Forbes and Clan Fraser continues. All Inspecting Ordnance Officer’s staff employed without break on the task of distributing and storing this ammunition.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Strength of Battalion: 27 officers, 882 other ranks.    

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Posted by on December 1, 2015 in 1940, 1942, September 1942, Uncategorized

 

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John A Mizzi: 23 June 1925 – 5 February 2013

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE                                                                 

John A MizziJohn A Mizzi was the creator and editor of Malta at War magazine, a compendium of the Island’s siege during World War Two.

John Mizzi began chronicling the history of wartime Malta as a 15-year-old boy in 1940, writing reports of the siege for British news publications. He was the youngest person to do so from any front line of battle at the time.

During the war John worked as a clerk at the Rationing Office at Qormi and Birkirkara, and later ran the clothing rationing section for the armed forces in Valletta.

After the war his career in journalism blossomed, and he spent nearly thirty years as news editor of The Times and The Sunday Times of Malta, as well as a stringer for The Daily Telegraph.

As well as his own publications, John Mizzi inspired and helped many historians who have written about Malta in World War Two, including maltagc70.  He recently appeared on the BBC TV documentary Battle for Malta, presented by James Holland.

Source of information:  Times of Malta

 

 
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Posted by on February 7, 2013 in 1942, September 1942, Uncategorized

 

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