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19 January 1942: Over 70 Attackers in 3 Hours as Convoy Arrives

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MOSTA CASUALTIES

72 enemy aircraft attacked Malta today as an incoming convoy approached bringing essential supplies to the Island.  A massive attempted raid on the convoy at 1230 hrs was driven off by Malta’s Hurricane squadrons, airborne to protect the vessels.  Less than an hour later, raiders returned for a heavy bombing raid on the Hurricane base at Ta Qali, causing heavy casualties in the town of Mosta.  All ships arrive safely in Grand Harbour.

CONVOY DOCKS SAFELY DESPITE RAIDS

Clan Ferguson

Ajax, Clan Ferguson and City of Calcutta steamed into Grand Harbour this afternoon, bringing reinforcements and 30000 tons of supplies for Malta. (1)  The convoy left Alexandria on 16 January in two groups, with the aim of dividing the attention of the enemy, before merging yesterday for the final run to Malta.  The Island’s Royal Navy Force K set out to relieve the protection vessels and cover the convoy’s approach, supported by RAF Hurricane aircraft.

AIR RAIDS 19 JANUARY 1942

Weather  Wind south west.  80% low clouds.  Bright periods with thundery showers.

Dawn  An enemy submarine is sighted five miles ahead of the incoming convoy, off the Island of Filfla; two Albacores go to attack but are shot down by an ME109 (the crew is rescued).

0831-0856 hrs  One JU88 bomber and three ME109 fighters pass near the incoming convoy of six destroyers and three merchant ships, to the south of the Island.  Hurricanes are up covering the convoy: no engagements.

0911-0939 hrs  One aircraft approaches Gozo from the north and recedes.  Hurricanes are up but do not engage.

1227 hrs  20 JU 88s with fighter escort attempt to attack the incoming convoy, which is protected by Hurricanes.

1300 hrs Hurricane SU 174 crash lands at Luqa, damaged by enemy fire: the pilot is uninjured.

1315 hrs  JU 88s attack Ta Qali, dropping nine bombs on the aerodrome and leaving four craters on the aerodrome surface.  Two direct hits on a rock shelter cause part of the roof to cave in.  A dispersal hut of 249 Squadron is damaged, one Hurricane, one Blenheim damaged.  Another Blenheim is damaged by fire.  Heavy Ack Ack fire a barrage.

Bombs are also dropped on Hal Far and on Mosta, where at least thirteen civilians and three airmen are killed.  Three more people are seriously wounded; fifteen slightly injured and in shock. One RAF billet at 122 Eucharistic Road is destroyed, another at 9 Tower Street is damaged.  Two motor buses and one lorry are damaged.

1447 hrs  Raiders passed.  The convoy enters Grand Harbour undamaged.

1517-1546 hrs  One JU 88 crosses the Island from south to north over Grand Harbour.  Heavy Ack Ack engages; fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1717-1811 hrs  42 aircraft (JU 88s and escorting ME 109s)  approach from the north.  Five ME 109s dive down to 400 feet and attack Swordfish aircraft on Hal Far airfield, damaging one.  225 Light Ack Ack Battery engage the ME 109s, damaging one.  The JU 88s cross over Kalafrana and drop bombs in a Wied [river valley] near Hal Far, and 200 yards off the coast.  There is no attack on the convoy in Grand Harbour.

2022-2048 hrs  Raid does not materialise.

2114-0144 hrs  Three aircraft approach during this period and carry out patrols around the Island, dropping bombs in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fire two barrages but operations are modified due to take-off and landing of friendly aircraft.

0206-0303 hrs  Two aircraft approach from the north and patrol round the Island, crossing the coast before receding.  Heavy Ack Ack fire three immediate barrages.  Bombs are dropped near Mellieha, Ta Silch and Hal Far.  One airman is killed at Kalafrana.  Heavy Ack Ack operations are modified due to take-off and landing of friendly aircraft.

Military casualties  LAC Harold Greenacre, RAF, 249 Squadron; LAC James Sim, RAF; Cpl John Small, RAF, 249 Squadron; Private John Spiteri, 3rd Bn, Kings Own Malta Regiment; Gunner Samuel Vickers, 10th HAA Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Mosta Luigi Barbara, age 60, Ines Bugeja, age 4, Joe Bugeja, age 7, Karmnu Buguja, age 5, Karmnu Bugeja, age 58, Mariana Bugeja, age 43, John Caruana, age 7, Francesca Riolo, age 71, Sunta Riolo, age 30, John Spiteri, age 23, Orazju Schembri, age 19, Evangelista Vella, age 34, John Vincenti, age 45; Lija John Fenech, age 27.

Enemy casualties  Alfred Beier; Kurt Krause; Waldemar Nikolay; Sebastian Pietschnig.

OPERATIONS REPORTS: MONDAY 19 JANUARY 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Swordfish from 235 Wing.

HAL FAR Two Albacores 828 Squadron carried out anti-submarine patrol.  One Albacore was shot down into the sea by enemy fighters (ME 109s).  The crew, S/Lt Howson and ALA Hedgman were rescued; both were wounded.

LUQA  69 Squadron One Maryland Cairo 5 patrol; one Maryland Cairo 4a patrol; one Beaufighter photo-reconnaissance North African aerodromes.  21 Squadron  Two Blenheims attacked Catania aerodrome.  S/D Flight  One Wellington special search.

TA QALI  Squadrons operating from Luqa, attached there for the day.  Four Hurricane bombers 249 Squadron proceeded Comiso and attacked target from 15000 feet.  Fires started: no opposition.  All aircraft returned by 0810 hrs.

CENTRAL INFANTRY BRIGADE  X Squadron, 6th Bn Royal Tank Regiment (OC Major Longworth, RTR) arrived in Malta and was placed forthwith under CIB for admin.  They are accommodated in the area of Verdala Palace.  From today to end of January the CIB will provide working parties of 400 men for extension of dispersal areas at Luqa: allocated 11th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers 170, 1st Bn Cheshire Regt 130, 2nd Bn Royal West Kents 100.

1st BN CHESHIRE REGIMENT  B & C Companies carried out the firing of the pistol course today.  Training is becoming more difficult daily.  We are now providing 130 men daily for working parties on Luqa aerodrome.  In addition today we have to find 20 men for unloading of a convoy of three ships.  This will probably last ten days.

2ND BN DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT 150-200 men engaged in building 2000 yards runway at Hal Far until further orders.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 5; dealt with 6 (4 x 500kg, 1 x 250kg, 1 x Thermos) not including anti-personnel bombs and incendiaries.

(1)  “This convoy brought in 20 Bofors 40mm AA guns together with 21 officers and 412 OR of 65th LAA Regiment. 8 A9 and A13 Cruiser tanks were also unloaded, to be manned by 85 officers and men of A Squadron, 6th Royal Tank Regiment. The ships also brought the first 4000-lb aircraft bombs to arrive in Malta for the RAF’s Wellingtons, 18 being unloaded. ”  Robert Dimech

“My great Uncle died on that day – he was a member of the 65th LAA regiment – the family story is that he went down on a ship in Malta but we have no further information and this looks like a good candidate.”  Roger Bradbury

 

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Posted by on January 19, 2022 in 1942, January 1942

 

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13 January 1942: 14 Air Raids – 9 Hours Under Fire

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“Weather, being low heavy rain-clouds, is favourable for dive-bombing.”  War Diary, 11TH Bn The Lancashire Fusiliers

  • 45 enemy fighters and bombers use cloud cover to launch 14 air raids in 19 hours
  • Civilian and military casualties
  • Heavy bombs on Luqa and Hal Far: Hurricane destroyed – Maryland and Blenheim shot down – 2 enemy fighters destroyed
  • Hal Far and Ta Qali runways still waterlogged

RE Bomb Disposal dig for UXB at bus station (NWMA Malta)

UNEXPLODED BOMB CLOSES MAIN BUS STATION FLORIANA

At 1340 hours this afternoon attackers dropped a stick of heavy bombs between Floriana and Valletta, leaving large craters scarring the formal gardens and avenues.

Civil defence officers find evidence of a possible unexploded bomb in the middle of the road at the heart of the main bus station outside Kingsgate (Porta Reale).  All bus movements into the area are brought to a halt and an urgent message is telephoned through to Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal.

Lt T W T Blackwell, RE arrives to confirm traces of a large unexploded bomb.  The area is sealed off until further notice and excavations begin.  It takes several hours and over 12 feet of digging before the bomb is – a 500 kg – can be defused and removed. (1)

AIR RAIDS 0001 HRS TO 2359 HRS 13 JANUARY 1942

Weather  Weather: cold wind SW; bright periods, thundery showers.

0347-0510 hrs  Two aircraft approach from the north, dropping bombs in the Mellieha and St Paul’s Bay areas, in Birzebbuga and in the sea off Ghar Hassan.  Heavy Ack Ack fire three immediate barrages.

0836-0913 hrs  One unidentified bomber and six plus fighters approach from the east.  The bomber crosses the coast over Kalafrana dropping bombs between Zeitun and Zabbar while the fighters remain over the sea.  Barrages are fired from Luqa and Harbour guns.  No Hurricanes are airborne.

0959-1030 hrs  One JU88 approaches from the west, crossing the coast near Dingli and dropping bombs between Sheleili Tower and Safi Strip, killing two Other Ranks and injuring six Other Ranks of A Company, 1st Bn The Hampshire Regiment. Four more bombs fall between Marsa and Luqa.  Heavy Ack Ack fire barrages; no Hurricanes are airborne.

1113 hrs Fifteen enemy aircraft – three JU 88s plus fighters – approach the Island from the north in three formations.  Both Heavy and Light Ack Ack guns engage, firing nine barrages.

1133 hrs   Three JU88s and fighters in three formations bomb the Hal Far and Safi areas. 

1200 hrs Four JU 88s and eight ME 109s attack Hal Far.  Two bombs are dropped on the aerodrome.  One Hurricane is a write-off, and two damaged.  No casualties.

1210 hrs  [Guns] Sandwich and Shoreham of 225th Light Ack Ack Battery engage one JU 88.

1239 hrs   All guns of 225th Light Ack Ack Battery engage at intervals ME109s at heights from 200ft to 600ft and at 3,500ft.  Sandwich claims one hit on a ME 109.  Ack Ack Light Machine Guns from Battalion HQ engage two ME 109s. FAS at Harrow position is rendered useless by enemy aircraft.

1245 hrs  One Maryland aircraft returning from a shipping search engages an ME 109 in a dogfight seven miles off the Malta coastline.  The pilot, Wing Commander John Dowland, GC, succeeds in shooting down the Messerschmitt, only to be shot down himself by two enemy fighters.  The Maryland crashes 40 feet from the coastline at Tigne, killing Wing Commander Dowland and Wireless Operator PO Robert Gridley. Observer PO Arnold Potter has managed to bail out and survives.  One of the Messerschmitts is also brought down, by Light Ack Ack fire.

1315-1418 hrs  Enemy formations totalling three JU 88s plus eleven fighters approach from the north.  Heavy and Light Ack Ack engage, firing six barrages and shooting down one ME 109. A 500kg bomb explodes just outside HQ of the 1st Bn The Cheshire Regiment, blowing out all the windows and damaging a wall.  No casualties, apart from a few minor cuts from broken glass sustained by orderly room staff.

1340 hrs A stick of bombs fall on the main highway between Valletta and Floriana, killing two and injuring eight.  Other bombs fall in Corradino and in the sea.  No Hurricanes are airborne.

1522 hrs  One JU 88 escorted by two ME 109s approach from the north; the ME 109s cross over the south east corner of the Island and skirt the south coast while the JU 88 crosses the coast near Madliena and drops bombs near Naxxar.  The Harbour and Luqa Barrages cause the bomber to recede.

1539-1554 hrs One JU88 approaches from the west and drops bombs on the Pembroke Ranges, causing casualties among a firing party.

1615-1652 hrs  Two JU 88 and four ME 109s approach from the north.  One JU 88 crosses the Island at 15000 feet, probably on reconnaissance.  A second JU 88 dives over Grand Harbour and drops bombs near Hal Far from 7500 feet.  No Hurricanes are airborne.

1733-1800 hrs  Three ME 109s approach from the west at 8000 feet and carry out a sweep round the Island – at times down to 500 feet above sea level.  Two Hurricanes are airborne but do not engage.

1949-2012 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the south east, drops bombs in the sea off Delimara, out of range of the guns, and then recedes.

2032-2049 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north over St Georges [Bay].  Three barrages are fired.  Bombs are dropped in Kalafrana Bay.

2112-2133 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north over St Paul’s Bay, crossing over Ta Qali and receding over Gozo, dropping bombs in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fires six barrages.

2211-2225 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north over Ricasoli, dropping bombs near Zabbar and the Palace which do not explode.  Heavy Ack Ack fires two immediate barrages.

2238-2254 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north west over Mellieha, crosses over Ta Qali and recedes north from Spinola.  Bombs fall near Zebbug.  Heavy Ack Ack fire three immediate barrages.

2312-0017 hrs  Five aircraft approach the Island during this period.  One raid fails to locate the Island and recedes.  Other raids cross the coast between Grand Harbour and Madliena, dropping bombs west of Birkirkara and in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fires two jmmediate barrages.

Night  Seven air raids involving a total of 22 bombers damage houses.  Ack Ack engages several times.

Civilian casualties  Siggiewi Censu Farrugia, age 24; Wigi Schembri, age 3.

Military casualties  Wing Commander John Dowland, GC, Pilot, Royal Air Force, 69 Squadron; Pilot Officer Robert Gridley, Royal Air Force, 69 Squadron; Pilot Officer John Hilton, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (VR); Pilot Officer Roderick Huggins, Royal Air Force; Sergeant John Lait, Royal Air Force (VR).  Private John Brandreth, 1st Bn The Hampshire Regiment; Private Henry Chant, 1st Bn The Hampshire Regiment.

OPERATIONS REPORTS: TUESDAY 13 JANUARY 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals six Blenheims, one Mosquito from Gibraltar. Five Hudsons to LG224; two Blenheims to Helwan.

LUQA 69 Squadron  Two Marylands search for shipping.  40 Squadron  Three Wellingtons on bombing mission.

TA QALI  Two fighter Blenheims carried out patrols.  P/O Huggins and two crew of one machine failed to return – presumed shot down.  Six airmen attached 242 Squadron from Luqa and Kalafrana.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 3; dealt with 1 (500kg) not including anti-personnel bombs and incendiaries.

(1) UXB Malta by S A M Hudson, History Press, 2010

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Posted by on January 13, 2022 in 1942, January 1942

 

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10 January 1942: Churchill Helps Malta’s Troops Write Home

 

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  • RAF Blenheim

    RAF Blenheim

    Fighter Blenheims to begin operations at Ta Qali

  • Bad weather prevents enemy raids and offensive operations from Luqa for a second night
  • Funeral of Anti-Aircraft Gunner at Pembroke Military Cemetery

RANDOLPH CHURCHILL TO HELP GOVERNOR IMPROVE TROOP POSTAL SERVICE

From: Governor & C in C Malta           To:  The War Office, copy C in C Middle East

Any scheme to improve unsatisfactory postal arrangements will be welcomed.  Doubtful whether 55 kilogrammes will suffice to take one card per man per week.  Estimate 70 kilogrammes required if all personnel take advantage of scheme.

In this connection please note that Mideast Air priorities committee have only guaranteed minimum of 50 kilogrammes per machine to include official mail as well as private.  This is quite inadequate.

Suggest that carriage of air letter cards should not be limited to BOAC machines but that advantage should be taken of space in any type of aircraft passing through so that real priority for letter cards can be ensured.  Scheme can not be put into operation until supply of letter cards has arrived.  Estimated weekly expenditure is twenty five thousand.  Please send initial supply by air as soon as possible.  As space is limiting factor installation of airgraph machinery here is again strongly advocated.  Major Randolph Churchill is bringing further details by hand shortly.  This telegram has been agreed by three services.

AIR RAIDS 0001 HRS TO 2359 HRS 10 JANUARY 1942

Weather Thundery showers, heavy at times; driving wind, cold.

0852-0900 hrs  Air raid warning; raid does not materialise.

1205-1207 hrs  One JU 88 approaches from the south east and recedes without crossing the coast, dropping bombs in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fires one barrage.

1412-1438 hrs  One JU 88 approaches from the south east under cloud cover at 14,500 feet, dives to 7000 feet and drops bombs on Luqa before climbing away to the east.  One barrack block near the Officers’ Mess is slightly damaged but there are no casualties.  Heavy Ack Ack fires a barrage and Hurricanes are airborne but fail to intercept.

1500-1515 hrs  Air raid warning.  Raid does not materialise.

1605-1631 hrs  Two JU 88 approach the south coast, one from the west and one from the south east.  They drop bombs on Hal Far, Tal Papa and near Gudja searchlight station.  Heavy Ack Ack fire a barrage and four Hurricanes are airborne but do not engage.

1630-1709 hrs  Air raid warning; raid does not materialise.

1700-1713 hrs  Air raid warning; raid does not materialise.

2252-2333 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north, dropping bombs in the sea off Leonardo.  Heavy Ack Ack fire three immediate barrages.

NIGHT  One raid only by a single aircraft which drops bombs in the sea.

OPERATIONS REPORTS 10 JANUARY 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Five Wellingtons, eight Blenheims from Gib. Departures  Six Blenheims, three Wellingtons to 108 MU.

LUQA  69 Squadron  One Maryland Tunisian coast patrol, one Maryland SF14 patrol, one Hurricane photo-reconnaissance Sicilian aerodromes.  21 Squadron  Three Blenheims despatched to attack merchant vessel off Kuriat.  Vessel not located.

TA QALI  Six air raid alarms during the day; gunfire; no bombs on camp.  Two fighter Blenheims arrived and Pilot Officer and Sergeants 242 Squadron at readiness for the first time.  No scrambles.

NORTHERN INFANTRY BRIGADE  Units of the Brigade found large working parties for work on dispersal areas for aircraft and improvement of runways at Ta Qali and Luqa.  This is to last some weeks.  Average number of men 400.

1st BN CHESHIRE REGIMENT  50 Other Ranks (OR) to Luqa aerodrome, to prepare dispersal areas for aircraft and improve runways. Our party of 12 men attached to Luqa for assisting in preparing aircraft returned today and another 12 were sent.

11TH BN LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS  Working party two Officers and 100 Other Ranks to Luqa to work on dispersal area edge of Safi Strip.

225TH LIGHT ACK ACK BATTERY, ROYAL ARTILLERY  1400 hrs  Gunner Goldsmith A G interred at Pembroke Military Cemetery, St Andrews, Malta.

8TH BN MANCHESTER REGIMENT About 100 men formed a fatigue party for moving clay from Ta Qali aerodrome.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 1; not including anti-personnel bombs and incendiaries.

 

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Posted by on January 10, 2022 in 1942, January 1942, Uncategorized

 

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9 January 1942: Army Builds Runways for RAF

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WEATHER GROUNDS AIRCRAFT

  • Gale force winds and heavy cloud prevent significant enemy raids and hamper operations from Malta’s air bases. 
  • A heavy swell this evening grounds the Catalina carrying General Scobell and family away from Malta. 
  • Hurricanes make a difficult landing returning from a mission in darkness.

WORKING PARTIES MOBILISED TO IMPROVE RAF LUQA

Central Infantry Brigade Order No 1

Safi Strip (NWMA)

Task  Dispersal of aircraft and improvement of runways for RAF.

Working Parties  These will be made up as follows: 

  • 2nd Bn The Royal West Kent Regiment – 100 men
  • 1st Bn The Chesire Regiment – 50 men
  • 11th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers – 100 men

Transport  All parties will have one lorry per 20 men available for work on the site…Units will be responsible for their own traffic regulation.

Tools  Shovels and picks will be [issued] on site.  2 Devon are returning 150 shovels.

Rations  Haversack rations for midday meal will be carried. It is hoped to arrange distribution of hot tea.

Dress  Denims, steel helmets.  NO respirators, NO rifles.  Anti-aircraft Light Machine Guns will, however, be taken in accordance with this HQ Signal 0.921 of today’s date…

Further demands on an increased scale are likely to be made.  The maximum commitment of this Brigade will be 500 men.

AIR RAIDS 0001 HRS TO 2359 HRS 9 JANUARY 1942

Weather  Cold – squally, heavy cloud; wind fresh, force five to gale force; Thundery showers.

0942-1009 hrs  One aircraft on shipping reconnaissance round the Island, 10-20 miles from the coast.

1800 hrs Nine Hurricanes scrambled at Ta Qali: air raid alarm; no contacts.  Planes got down in darkness with difficulty under personal direction of the C O.

Qalet Marku, Bahar-ic-Cahaq

1821-1904 hrs  Fourteen plus aircraft (bombers and fighter escort) approach from the north in four formations.  One raid crosses the coast near Kalafrana and drops bombs west of Hal Far aerodrome and near Ta Silg [radar station].  The second and third raids drop bombs in the Wied at rear of Sans Souci and in the sea off Zonkor Point.   The fourth raid crosses the coast near St Paul’s Bay, dropping bombs in the sea near Madliena and Torri Qalet Marku.  Six hurricanes are airborne; Heavy Ack Ack fire barrages.

1904-2025 hrs  Air raid warning. Raid does not materialise.

2015 hrs  Air raid warning.  One aircraft crosses the coast.  Ack Ack engages and aircraft recedes.

OPERATIONS REPORTS: FRIDAY 9 JANUARY 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals five Marylands, one Beaufighter from Middle East; three Blenheims, two Hurricanes from El Adem.

LUQA  69 Squadron  One Beaufighter photo-reconnaissance Tripoli (F/O Warburton), one Maryland shipping search; one Maryland SF14 patrol.  107 Squadron  One Blenheim SF2b patrol.

TA QALI   242 Squadron under S/Ldr Wells with seven Officers and seven Sergeant Pilots attached this station for operations from Hal Far.

1st BN CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Companies are re-firing the Tommy Gun and Anti Tank Rifle.  The day was free from air raids: a surprising change.  At dusk 14 aircraft were over and dropped bombs but damage was negligeable.  The night was quiet.  We were to have held a “Close Valletta” exercise between 0100 hrs and 0545 hrs.  This was started but owing to bad weather and to resultant darkness preventing use of tanks it was postponed.

1st BN DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  1815 hrs Four bombs in field in front of D3.  Two rifles and one water tank damaged.  Four bombs in Ta Ingrau area bearing 270 degrees from Tas Sienja Tower.  One stick of bombs between RA7 and SA1.  One stick of bombs in Latnia area.  No military damage or casualties.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 7; dealt with 2 (1 x 50kg, 1 x Thermos) not including anti-personnel bombs and incendiaries.

 

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Posted by on January 9, 2022 in 1942, January 1942

 

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7 January 1942: Storms Over Malta

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AIRFIELDS WATERLOGGED

Wellington bombers

Wellington bombers

Bad weather has forced Malta’s Air Officer Commanding to send two squadrons of Wellington aircraft to the Middle East, until hard standings can be constructed in waterlogged dispersal areas.  The conditions have so far prevented the Lufwaffe from carrying out their planned dive-bombing attacks on the airfields.

The cloudy weather is also preventing the searchlights operating in tandem with the Island’s Night Fighter Squadron against enemy raiders.  Instead, the Squadron’s aircraft are fitted for offensive operations against enemy aerodromes.

AMMUNITION ON ITS WAY

From:  The War Office                              To: Governor & C in C Malta

Reptd:  C in C Middle East                                            

Reference your telegram of 30 December: 20 million half 40 millions SAA are being sent to you from Middle East.

AIR RAIDS 0001 HRS TO 2359 HRS 7 JANUARY 1942

Weather  Fair; wind SW.  Heavy rain in the morning, clearing later.

0912-0937 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north above the clouds, circles Grand Harbour and drops bombs in the Dockyard area and in Zabbar.  Heavy Ack Ack fires the Harbour barrage.

1019-1111 hrs  One JU 88 approaches from the north, patrols several miles north of Grand Harbour and recedes without crossing the coast.

1138-1153 hrs  Air raid alarm; raid does not materialise.

1705 hrs  A plot of three JU 88s and twelve ME 109s bombs Ta Qali and Luqa: no damage.  One JU 88 is damaged by Ack Ack.  The enemy fire machine guns at searchlights.

1720-1749 hrs  Three JU 88s escorted by twelve ME 109 approach from the west, dropping bombs on Ta Qali and Luqa , and on Dingli village, where two houses are demolished, with one casualty.  Four bombs drop on the RAF camp at Ta Qali near barrack huts and dispersal areas.  One barrack hut is damaged.  Some RAF casualties; no damage to aircraft reported.  No Hurricanes airborne.  Heavy Ack Ack engaged: one JU 88 is hit and left smoking badly but is not seen to come down.

1825-1855 hrs  Four aircraft approach from the north east and cross the coast over Kalafrana, dropping bombs on Marsaxlokk, Hal Far, Luqa and Gudja.  One JU 88 is engaged by three guns of 225th Light Ack Ack Bty firing 34 rounds 40mm.  Another gun engaged a separate JU 88 at the same time with total of six rounds 40mm.

1952-2102 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north east and patrols east of the Island.  On approaching Kalafrana he flies into a barrage, recedes and resumes his patrol off-shore.  No bombs are reported.

2135-2145 hrs  One aircraft approaches Gozo and recedes without crossing the coast.

2315-0039 hrs  Two aircraft approach from the north east and patrol south east of the Island.  One aircraft crosses the coast and drops bombs near Ta Qali and two sticks of bombs north of Rabat.  Heavy Ack Ack open fire.

Night  Five alerts during hours of darkness lasting most of the night.  Bombs are dropped between Ta Qali and Qrendi, and on Kalafrana.  Ack Ack fire is heard over Grand Harbour and machine-gunning towards Gozo.

Civilian casualties  Dingli  Anthony Pace, age 75.

Military casualties  Sergeant Sydney Baker, Royal Air Force, 18 Squadron; Sergeant Robert Hillman, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 18 Squadron; Sergeant Derek Phillips, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 18 Squadron; AC1 William Fullbrook, RAF Volunteer Reserve (VR); AC1 George Horn, RAF VR; AC2 George Maltby, RAF VR; AC1 Jeremiah Ryan, RAF VR; AC1 William Watson, RAF VR; L/Bdr Edward Brown, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment, Royal Artillery.

OPERATIONS REPORTS: WEDNESDAY 7 JANUARY 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Fourteen Hudsons, three Wellingtons from Gibraltar. Departures Five Hudsons, one Beaufighter to 108 MU.

LUQA  69 Squadron  One Beaufighter photo-reconnaissance Tripoli Harbour; one Maryland SF 15 patrol reversed. 107 Squadron  One Blenheim SF14 patrol. 18 Squadron  One Blenheim SF14 patrol.

TA QALI  Aerodrome unserviceable: no flying.

1st BATTALION CHESHIRE REGIMENT  At ‘stand-to’ a total of 22 Vickers machine guns and 27 light machine guns in the battalion were manned for Ack Ack defence of Luqa aerodroma, and the normal 22 guns had been thickened up to 90 in some depth.  The dive-bombing attack did not materialise.  Five enemy aircraft came over and dropped bombs through the clouds.  Some fell in the dockyard but the last of the stick fell on the sports store of D Company, in which there were four men.  Miraculously no-one was killed: one man is fit for duty and three are in hospital.  Their injuries are not yet known.  1615 hrs The new GOC Major General D M W Beak, VC, DSO, MC visited Battalion HQ.

1st BATTALION DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  0714 hrs 56 Light Machine Guns mounted for Ack Ack at ‘stand to’.  “B” Company consisting of nine LMG detachments and Company and platoon HQs in position in area Bir Miftuh church.

11TH BATTALION LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS  0815 hrs  All troops of this unit reported in position as per Operations Order.  No attack developed as yet.   Working parties at Luqa again not utilised.

8TH BATTALION MANCHESTER REGIMENT  New General Officer Commanding (GOC) visited Battalion area.  Message from Brigade cancels the anti-aircraft precautions ordered yesterday, except on aerodromes.  One unexploded mine located; Post GT3 evacuated.

2ND BATTALION ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  0730 hrs  Battalion mounted all available Light Machine Guns for protection of Luqa aerodrome. D Company Mqabba; C Company Luqa; E Company Poorhouse; HQ and B Company Marsa area.  Guns manned all day. 1600 hrs GOC Major General Beak visited Battalion HQ. 

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 1.

 

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Posted by on January 7, 2022 in 1942, January 1942

 

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6 January 1942: Attacks to Neutralise Airfields To Begin Tomorrow

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TROOPS STAND READY TO DEFEND AIRFIELD POSITIONS

Infantry Brigade Operation Order 6 January 1942

British 3.7 inch (LAA) gun, London

British 3.7 inch (LAA) gun, London

Reliable information indicates that Germans may attempt neutralization of Malta aerodromes by heavy dive-bombing attacks beginning 7 Jan 42.  Necessary AA arrangements are being made which involve moving additional troops and Light Anti-aircraft guns into position to reinforce those already defending the airfields.

The intention is to provide maximum defence of aerodromes from ‘stand to’ throughout daylight on 7 Jan 42, both round the airfields themselves and in depth beyond the perimeters.  Positions have been ordered not to ‘stand down’ until further orders are received from Headquarters.

A wet and stormy night prevented enemy air raids, and the move of troops was carried out unmolested.  Malta’s troops are armed and ready.

AIR RAIDS 0001 HRS TO 2359 HRS 6 JANUARY 1942

Weather  Cold, overcast; low clouds, rain most of the day.

1053-1110 hrs  Air raid alarm.  Aircraft identified as friendly.

1210-1225 hrs  One aircraft approaches from the north east above the clouds.  Heavy Ack Ack engage and aircraft drops bombs in St Thomas’ Bay area: three in the sea and one on the cliff ege.  No Hurricanes airborne.

1255-1305 hrs  Air raid alarm; raid did not materialise.

1430-1445 hrs  One aircraft approaches to within six miles of Grand Harbour, drops bombs in the sea and recedes.

1546 hrs  Air raid.  Four bombs are dropped in the waters of Marsaxlokk Bay between defence post BZ1 and Delimara.

OPERATIONS REPORTS: TUESDAY 6 JANUARY 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Breconshire sailed from Malta escorted by four destroyers: Lance, Lively, Jaguar and Havock

AIR HQ  Arrivals One Beaufighter, six Blenheims from Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  Night 6/7th Four Swordfish 830 Squadron sent to attack convoy of two merchant vessels and two destroyers.  One merchant vessel of 4-5000 tons definitely hit amidships.  All aircraft returned safely.  Three Albacores sent to attack two merchant vessels and two destroyers.  One of the merchant vessels was attacked and hit.  The ship stopped.  Opposition usual light and heavy Ack Ack.  All aircraft returned safely.

LUQA  69 Squadron  One Maryland special search Gulf of Hammamet;  one Maryland SF10b patrol.  107 Squadron One Blenheim SF14 patrol.  Night 6/7th  S/D Flight one Wellington shipping search.  40 Squadron patrol.

TA QALI  Aerodrome unserviceable; no flying.  One air raid alarm.

CENTRAL INFANTRY BRIGADE  1030 hrs  New General Officer Commanding (Major General D M W Beak, VC, DSO, MC, visited Brigade and met officers.  Operation Order No 1 was issued in connection with strengthening anti-aircraft (Ack Ack) defences of Luqa aerodrome.

Bren Light Machine Gun

SOUTHERN INFANTRY BRIGADE  The Light Machine Gun (LMG) Ack Ack defence of all aerodromes and strips in the Bde area was considerably strengthened.  LMGs mounted were: Brens 133, Twin Lewis 17, Single Lewis 10.

1st BATTALION CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Orders were to man as many light machine guns and Vickers machine guns for anti-aircraft as possible.  Company commanders to recce and select positions at dawn.

1st BATTALION DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Brigade Commander ordered Reserve Company to move to area Safi strip to supplement Anti-aircraft defences and as many LMGs as possible mounted for Ack Ack by remaining companies.

1ST BATTALION HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  The Battalion took precautions and ‘stood to’ all Anti-aircraft Light Machine Gun posts while the defence of Safi strip was thickened with extra Ack Ack LMG from the Battalion and from the Dorsets.

11TH BATTALION LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS  Operation Order No 1 from Central Infantry Brigade issued ref move of troops for intensification of anti-aircraft protection of Luqa aerodromes.

225TH LIGHT ACK ACK BATTERY, ROYAL ARTILLERY  Orders received for reinforcing Hal Far anti-aircraft defence with an additional 9 guns:  59th Light Ack Ack Battery (LAA Bty) RA: 5 guns; 182nd LAA Bty RA: 2 guns; 186th LAA Bty RA: 2 guns.  Reconnaissance completed 2030 hrs.  Guns ready for action by dawn 7th inst.

8TH BATTALION MANCHESTER REGIMENT  All LMG in the Battalion are to be mounted for anti-aircraft duty.  Approximately 50 men from Aerodrome Companies at Ta Qali filled in bomb holes on runways and dispersal areas.

2ND BATTALION ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  Working party cancelled at Luqa due to wet weather.  Instructions were issued that Light Anti-Aircraft batteries and certain light machine guns would move to strengthen the Ack Ack defences of Luqa.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 6.

 

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Posted by on January 6, 2022 in 1942, January 1942, Uncategorized

 

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24 October 1941: Malta Supply Ship Missing

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Catalina

A Catalina made a thorough search

EMPIRE GUILLEMOT FAILS TO MAKE RENDEZVOUS

SS Empire Guillemot, the ship which delivered fodder to Malta on 19 September, has been reported missing on her return journey to Gibraltar. The merchant ship should have departed at the end of September during ‘Operation Halberd’ but was delayed. A week ago she embarked along with SS Clan Macdonald but returned to port later with engine trouble.

Empire Guillemot finally left Malta on Wednesday morning, at the same time as other merchant ships City of Lincoln and Dunedin Star.  The three were to take separate routes to Gibraltar. 

A Catalina aircraft from Gibraltar which had been scheduled to escort Empire Guillemot through the final leg of her journey was unable to find her anywhere near the rendezvous point.  A Swordfish was then diverted to aid the search but could find no trace of the merchantman.  A further search by three aircraft this morning also drew a blank, and the vessel is now feared to have been sunk.  

Another convoy supply ship which left Malta today was attacked shortly after leaving Grand Harbour. Clan Ferguson had just set out for Gibraltar when enemy aircraft appeared in her wake and launched an attack a short distance from the Island.  As the enemy was clearly aware of her voyage, it was decided the merchant ship should return to Grand Harbour immediately.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 OCTOBER TO DAWN 25 OCTOBER 1941

Weather  Fine.

1015-1026 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft which cross the Island at great height. Fourteen Hurricanes are scrambled but the raiders retreat before there is any interception.

1356-1407 hrs  Air raid alert for two Macchi fighters which approach from the north, cross the coast near Grand Harbour, pass over Kalafrana and turn away to recede northwards – probably on reconnaissance. Seven Hurricanes are scrambled but cannot reach sufficient height to intercept; there is no engagement by Ack Ack guns.

Civilian casualties  Gozo John Pisani, age 49.  

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 24 OCTOBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY Tetrarch arrived from Alexandria with stores and kerosene. Clan Ferguson sailed independently for Gibraltar.

AIR HQ Arrivals 1 Maryland, 2 Sunderland, 9 Wellington. Departures 1 Beaufighter, 7 Wellington. SD Flight 1 Wellington search for convoy. 18 Squadron 5 Blenheims attacked a factory at Licata.  69 Squadron  3 Marylands special patrols.  Photoreconnaissance Castel Vetrano and Tripoli. 104 Squadron 4 Wellingtons attacked Naples; 2 recalled due to bad weather.  6 Wellingtons attacked Tripoli.  830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm  2 Swordfish searched for missing Wellington; search unsuccessful.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The General Officer Commanding, Malta, carried out an inspection of C Company. It is the system that the infantry company command co-ordinates the defence of all areas in his sector.  The inspection therefore included three forts, six Bofors and an 18 pounder position. The GOC was most pleased.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS No 2 Section 173 Company completed a workshop and store for Bomb Disposal at Polverista Gate. Bomb Disposal UXB reported 6; dealt with 6 (2kg incendiary).

MALTA SIGNALS COMPANY  4 other ranks disembarked and posted to SWS Malta.

 

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Posted by on October 24, 2021 in 1941, October 1941

 

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8 October 1941: London Press Heralds Malta Attacks on Axis Convoys

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Fleet Air Arm Swordfish

“ITALIAN SHIPPING: ANOTHER HEAVY BLOW”

London, 8 October 1941 – from a press correspondent in Malta

“Another heavy success against enemy shipping in the Mediterranean – this time by planes of the Fleet Air Arm – was revealed in a dispatch from Malta last night. The story of the new blow followed hard on the Admiralty announcement yesterday morning that British submarines operating in the Mediterranean had hit with torpedoes and sunk or seriously damaged 11 enemy vessels. 

‘The Fleet Air Arm on Sunday night launched a sudden, savage attack against an Italian convoy steaming south in the Ionian Sea,” says the Malta message. “The convoy, which was first sighted before daylight, comprised four merchantmen of from 8000 to 10000 tons, two between 4000 and 6000 tons, and five destroyers.

A Fleet Air Arm formation attacked in bright moonlight. The first two planes swept in, attacking the rearmost vessels from starboard and from port respectively.  Before the Italians opened fire they were beyond range, leaving the largest merchantman listing heavily and belching black smoke, and a 6000 ton ship with its stern under water and also listing heavily.  The crews were seen taking to the boats and pulling towards a destroyer.  The destroyers frantically opened fire and laid a smoke screen which, however, a strong wind dispersed. 

The remainder of the formation then attacked the convoy. The leading plane straddled a large vessel with a stick of bombs, probably damaging its bows.  Another attacked a ship on the starboard column.  It swung out of line and stopped.  All the planes returned safely.’”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 OCTOBER TO DAWN 9 OCTOBER 1941

Weather  Heavy rain in the afternoon.

Dawn  Enemy aircraft carry out air reconnaissance in the area where surface vessels were detected overnight.

Civilian casualties  Balzan  Susanna Galea, age 41.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 8 OCTOBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY  Perseus arrived from patrol off Benghazi for docking and repairs.  Two small supply ships sunk. P34 arrived from the United Kingdom via Gibraltar.  

AIR HQ  Departures 1 Beaufighter, 8 Blenheim. 69 Squadron  Maryland patrols east Tunisian coast and 3 special patrols. 107 Squadron 6 Blenheims attacked transport on the Misurata-Sirte road. 221 Squadron 2 Wellingtons on special patrols. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 4 Swordfish attacked a northbound enemy convoy of one merchant ship, a schooner and two trawlers.  Two torpedoes were dropped hitting a merchant ship which sank.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  An exercise with ‘attack’ by mobile infantry platoons and three tanks of Malta Tank Troop on Royal Artillery harbour gun positions and forts of San Pietru, Rocco, Rinella and Ricasoli.

 

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Posted by on October 8, 2021 in 1941, October 1941

 

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30 September 1941: Submarines Sink 49 Axis Ships in 3 Months

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RAF raid on German ammunition dump in Libyan desert August 1941

RAF raid on German ammunition dump in Libyan desert August 1941

ROYAL NAVY MONTHLY REVIEWS SEPTEMBER 1941

Between June and the end of September, submarines have sunk a total of 49 enemy ships – an overall 150,000 tons – in the Mediterranean. Added to the losses inflicted by the RAF this represented a high proportion of Axis shipping bound for Libya.

12 patrols were carried out during the month by submarines of 10th Flotilla.  In addition, Triumph proceeded to a successful patrol in the Adriatic, Perseus to an area off Kefalonia, and Otus and Osiris direct to Alexandria.

Unbeaten carried out a spirited bombardment of a tunnel which caused consternation to the local home guard, and Upright sank a destroyer of the Generale class.  The most successful operation was against a fast convoy east of Tripoli, during which Upholder scored one hit on each of Oceania and Neptunia in a night attack and after reloading returned to sink one of them with two torpedoes at dawn.  The other ship’s fate is unknown.  The Vulcania of the same convoy was intercepted by Ursula which scored one hit on the ship causing it to list slightly and reduce speed.

No bombs were reported as having fallen on the Dockyard or other Naval establishments. No unexploded bombs were dealt with by the Royal Navy during the month. 

AIR HQ REPORTS A TOTAL OF 233 TONS OF BOMBS ON TRIPOLI THIS MONTH

During the month sweeps over enemy territory by Malta fighters, some equipped to carry 40lb bombs, were added to the strategy.

Marylands and photoreconnaissance Hurricanes of 69 Squadron have covered the Italian convoy routes daily as well as making frequent reconnaissances of Sicilian and southern Calabrian ports and aerodromes, and of Tripoli. Naples has also been visited.  The excellent photographs, visual and sighting reports obtained have indirectly been responsible for the increased pressure of offensive effort from Malta during the month.

Offensive Operations:  Wellingtons of 38 Squadron carried out 26 operations during September, with an average of eight aircraft on each sortie. Over 233 tons of bombs have been dropped on Tripoli during 17 raids, causing considerable damage to harbour installations and the town. Palermo has been attacked five times, Messina twice, Benhazi and Kuriat once each.

Blenheims of 105 and 107 Squadrons carried out 31 operations, 20 of these directed against enemy shipping. Considerable damage was done to the chemical works and harbour installations at Crotone, factories at Licata, transport centres at Homs, barracks at Misurata and a power station at Porto Empedocle.  Five sweeps have been made along the Tripoli-Benghazi road during which petrol tankers and other transport vehicles have been bombed and machine-gunned.

Hurricanes (equipped with cannon) of 249 Squadron attacked the railway station at Pozallo, while those of 185 Squadron have carried out three bombing raids on Comiso aerodrome. On one of these raids a Hurricane was lost but the pilot was subsequently rescued. 

Swordfish of 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm carried out 16 operations, 13 of these against enemy shipping, and have sunk two motor vessels and one destroyer, as well as damaging others. Mines have been laid on two occasions in Tripoli Harbour and once at Palermo.  As a result of torpedo attacks two merchant ships are claimed sunk, one destroyer and three merchantmen probably sunk, seven damaged and a further five probably damaged. 

Beaufighters of 272 Squadron were attached to this command during ‘Operation Halberd’ and were used to attack Sardinian and Sicilian aerodromes. Searches were also made south of Sicily for torpedo boats.

On 14 nights Fulmars have operated over aerodromes in southern Sicily, dropping small bombs and machine-gunning aircraft on the ground. One Fulmar force-landed in the sea; the crew were rescued.

Defensive Action: 126 Squadron carried out 31 scrambles during the month, 249 Squadron 22 and 185 Squadron 66. The Malta Night Fighter Unit had 22 scrambles and shot down two enemy aircraft.  Eleven enemy aircraft were confirmed destroyed, plus one probable and five damaged, against the loss of two Hurricanes.

Enemy Activity: There have been nine day alerts and 20 night alerts during the month. None of these raids was heavy and bombs have only been dropped at night.  Damage has been negligible and confined to civilian property. 

HURRICANES ATTACKED AS THEY SEARCH FOR MISSING PILOT

Malta fighters were attacked tonight by five enemy aircraft as they helped search for one of their own Hurricane pilots reported missing after a raid. Eleven Hurricanes of 185 Squadron had earlier attacked Comiso aerodrome but as they returned to their base at Hal Far they learned that one of their pilots, P/O Donald Lintern, was missing.  Five Hurricanes took off again to escort a Fulmar which was sent to search for the missing pilot.  As they circled the area to the north of Gozo, enemy aircraft approached and attacked the Malta fighters.  In the ensuing dogfight one of the enemy fighters was shot down.  P/O Lintern was not been found and the search was eventually called off.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 1 OCTOBER 1941

Weather  Fine and fresh.

No air raids.

Military casualties  Sergeant Robert L Kitch, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 200 Squadron; Pilot Officer Donald W Lintern, RAFVR, 185 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ Arrivals 4 Wellington. Departures 6 Beaufighter, 4 Blenheim fighter. Fleet Air Arm One Fulmar on offensive patrol over Gerbini and Catania aerodromes dropped high explosive bombs on Gerbini dispersal area. 38 Squadron 9 Wellingtons attacked a motor transport depot in Tripoli. 69 Squadron Photoreconnaissance eastern and southern Sicily, east Calabrian coast and Tripoli.  Patrol of east Sicilian coast and shipping search off Tripoli area. 107 Squadron 4 Blenheims attacked shipping and motor transport near Misurata and Beurat.  1 Blenheim attacked a schooner.  1 Blenheim on search for shipping north of Crotone. 

HAL FAR  185 Squadron 11 Hurricanes attacked Comiso aerodrome, 5 carrying bombs and 6 acting as fighter escort. High explosive bombs and incendiaries were dropped on buildings and a dispersal area.  The aircraft of P/O Lintern failed to return. 

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Mobile machine-gun company carried out an exercise to the north west of Rabat.

2nd Bn DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT  Strengths 33 officers, 870 other ranks.

2nd Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Strengths 21 officers, 443 other ranks.

3rd Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Strengths 18 officers, 708 other ranks. Recruits joined in September: 77.

ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS  Strengths 18 officers, 8 WO1, 214 other ranks.

 

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Posted by on September 30, 2021 in 1941, September 1941

 

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13 September 1941: 45 New Hurricanes for Malta

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HMS Furious

HMS Furious

OPERATION STATUS PHASE II A SUCCESS

45 Hurricanes flew in to Malta today, the second reinforcement of fighters to arrive on the Island in a week. Their arrival completes Operation Status which was intended to deliver some 60 Hurricanes in total.  However, the first phase last Tuesday was only partially completed, when guide Blenheims did not arrive to escort fighters from their aircraft carrier to the Island.

Ark Royal returned to Gibraltar on Wednesday and, following a rapid turn-round, embarked with 26 Hurricanes. A second carrier Furious departed with a separate protective force carrying another 20.  They were due to rendezvous yesterday for the Hurricanes to fly off to Malta but the event had to be postponed. 

Early this morning seven Blenheims from Malta reached the rearranged rendezvous ready to guide the Hurricanes to their destination. All but one of the 46 fighters took off successfully and completed a safe transit to the Island.  The remaining Hurricane crashed on take-off.

NIGHT CURFEW FOR TROOPS

New curfew regulations have been introduced for 1st Bn Cheshire Regiment.  From today no serviceman may be away from his billet after 1930 hours except those on 24 hours or 3 days’ leave.  In addition, only 25 per cent of men may be away on leave at one time.  The regulations are designed to ensure that posts can be quickly manned against surprise attack.

However, the Battalion commanders recognise that the new requirement to stay in at night make it imperative that the men have more NAAFI accommodation and a recreation room. The Battalion is trying to find a suitable place for an HQ Officers Mess so that the present Mess may be given over to the men.

SHORTAGE OF OFFICERS IN MALTA

From: Governor & C in C Malta                         To: War Office

We are still short of the following infantry officers in Malta: 4th Bn The Buffs 4, Kings Own Malta Regiment 5, Devonshire 9, 1st Bn Cheshire Regt 4, 1st Bn Hampshire Regt 8, 1st Bn Dorset Regt 7, 2nd Bn Royal West Kent Regt 7, 8th Bn Manchester Regt 4, 2nd Bn Royal Irish Fusiliers 8: total 56.  The Middle East reports that officer material is drying up.  A small class of NCOs sent to their officer training unit will not be ready until next year.  I request the early despatch of as many as possible to meet the deficiency.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 13 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 14 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

1117-1130 hrs Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft approaching the Island. Ten Hurricanes 249 Squadron and nine 195 Squadron are scrambled.  The raiders turn away before reaching Malta and there are no interceptions.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ Arrivals 1 Sunderland. Departures 1 Sunderland, 1 Wellington. 38 Squadron 7 Wellingtons attacked Tripoli Harbour. 69 Squadron 1 Blenheim special patrol; photo-reconnaissance east Sicilian coast. 105 Squadron 3 Blenheims searched for missing Blenheim crews.  3 Blenheims search and sweep for shipping, central Ionian Sea. Fleet Air Arm One Fulmar offensive patrol over Gerbini and Catania dropped high explosive bombs south east of Gerbini and incendiaries near Moto.

TA QALI  8 officers and 6 sergeant pilots arrived by Hurricane from HMS Ark Royal. 6 officers and 5 sergeant pilots arrived by Hurricane from HMS Furious.  8 officers and 7 sergeant pilots left by air for the Middle East. 

 

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Posted by on September 13, 2021 in 1941, September 1941

 

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