RSS

Tag Archives: 105 Squadron

30 September 1941: Submarines Sink 49 Axis Ships in 3 Months

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

RAF raid on German ammunition dump in Libyan desert August 1941

RAF raid on German ammunition dump in Libyan desert August 1941

ROYAL NAVY MONTHLY REVIEWS SEPTEMBER 1941

Between June and the end of September, submarines have sunk a total of 49 enemy ships – an overall 150,000 tons – in the Mediterranean. Added to the losses inflicted by the RAF this represented a high proportion of Axis shipping bound for Libya.

12 patrols were carried out during the month by submarines of 10th Flotilla.  In addition, Triumph proceeded to a successful patrol in the Adriatic, Perseus to an area off Kefalonia, and Otus and Osiris direct to Alexandria.

Unbeaten carried out a spirited bombardment of a tunnel which caused consternation to the local home guard, and Upright sank a destroyer of the Generale class.  The most successful operation was against a fast convoy east of Tripoli, during which Upholder scored one hit on each of Oceania and Neptunia in a night attack and after reloading returned to sink one of them with two torpedoes at dawn.  The other ship’s fate is unknown.  The Vulcania of the same convoy was intercepted by Ursula which scored one hit on the ship causing it to list slightly and reduce speed.

No bombs were reported as having fallen on the Dockyard or other Naval establishments. No unexploded bombs were dealt with by the Royal Navy during the month. 

AIR HQ REPORTS A TOTAL OF 233 TONS OF BOMBS ON TRIPOLI THIS MONTH

During the month sweeps over enemy territory by Malta fighters, some equipped to carry 40lb bombs, were added to the strategy.

Marylands and photoreconnaissance Hurricanes of 69 Squadron have covered the Italian convoy routes daily as well as making frequent reconnaissances of Sicilian and southern Calabrian ports and aerodromes, and of Tripoli. Naples has also been visited.  The excellent photographs, visual and sighting reports obtained have indirectly been responsible for the increased pressure of offensive effort from Malta during the month.

Offensive Operations:  Wellingtons of 38 Squadron carried out 26 operations during September, with an average of eight aircraft on each sortie. Over 233 tons of bombs have been dropped on Tripoli during 17 raids, causing considerable damage to harbour installations and the town. Palermo has been attacked five times, Messina twice, Benhazi and Kuriat once each.

Blenheims of 105 and 107 Squadrons carried out 31 operations, 20 of these directed against enemy shipping. Considerable damage was done to the chemical works and harbour installations at Crotone, factories at Licata, transport centres at Homs, barracks at Misurata and a power station at Porto Empedocle.  Five sweeps have been made along the Tripoli-Benghazi road during which petrol tankers and other transport vehicles have been bombed and machine-gunned.

Hurricanes (equipped with cannon) of 249 Squadron attacked the railway station at Pozallo, while those of 185 Squadron have carried out three bombing raids on Comiso aerodrome. On one of these raids a Hurricane was lost but the pilot was subsequently rescued. 

Swordfish of 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm carried out 16 operations, 13 of these against enemy shipping, and have sunk two motor vessels and one destroyer, as well as damaging others. Mines have been laid on two occasions in Tripoli Harbour and once at Palermo.  As a result of torpedo attacks two merchant ships are claimed sunk, one destroyer and three merchantmen probably sunk, seven damaged and a further five probably damaged. 

Beaufighters of 272 Squadron were attached to this command during ‘Operation Halberd’ and were used to attack Sardinian and Sicilian aerodromes. Searches were also made south of Sicily for torpedo boats.

On 14 nights Fulmars have operated over aerodromes in southern Sicily, dropping small bombs and machine-gunning aircraft on the ground. One Fulmar force-landed in the sea; the crew were rescued.

Defensive Action: 126 Squadron carried out 31 scrambles during the month, 249 Squadron 22 and 185 Squadron 66. The Malta Night Fighter Unit had 22 scrambles and shot down two enemy aircraft.  Eleven enemy aircraft were confirmed destroyed, plus one probable and five damaged, against the loss of two Hurricanes.

Enemy Activity: There have been nine day alerts and 20 night alerts during the month. None of these raids was heavy and bombs have only been dropped at night.  Damage has been negligible and confined to civilian property. 

HURRICANES ATTACKED AS THEY SEARCH FOR MISSING PILOT

Malta fighters were attacked tonight by five enemy aircraft as they helped search for one of their own Hurricane pilots reported missing after a raid. Eleven Hurricanes of 185 Squadron had earlier attacked Comiso aerodrome but as they returned to their base at Hal Far they learned that one of their pilots, P/O Donald Lintern, was missing.  Five Hurricanes took off again to escort a Fulmar which was sent to search for the missing pilot.  As they circled the area to the north of Gozo, enemy aircraft approached and attacked the Malta fighters.  In the ensuing dogfight one of the enemy fighters was shot down.  P/O Lintern was not been found and the search was eventually called off.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 1 OCTOBER 1941

Weather  Fine and fresh.

No air raids.

Military casualties  Sergeant Robert L Kitch, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 200 Squadron; Pilot Officer Donald W Lintern, RAFVR, 185 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ Arrivals 4 Wellington. Departures 6 Beaufighter, 4 Blenheim fighter. Fleet Air Arm One Fulmar on offensive patrol over Gerbini and Catania aerodromes dropped high explosive bombs on Gerbini dispersal area. 38 Squadron 9 Wellingtons attacked a motor transport depot in Tripoli. 69 Squadron Photoreconnaissance eastern and southern Sicily, east Calabrian coast and Tripoli.  Patrol of east Sicilian coast and shipping search off Tripoli area. 107 Squadron 4 Blenheims attacked shipping and motor transport near Misurata and Beurat.  1 Blenheim attacked a schooner.  1 Blenheim on search for shipping north of Crotone. 

HAL FAR  185 Squadron 11 Hurricanes attacked Comiso aerodrome, 5 carrying bombs and 6 acting as fighter escort. High explosive bombs and incendiaries were dropped on buildings and a dispersal area.  The aircraft of P/O Lintern failed to return. 

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  Mobile machine-gun company carried out an exercise to the north west of Rabat.

2nd Bn DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT  Strengths 33 officers, 870 other ranks.

2nd Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Strengths 21 officers, 443 other ranks.

3rd Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Strengths 18 officers, 708 other ranks. Recruits joined in September: 77.

ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS  Strengths 18 officers, 8 WO1, 214 other ranks.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 30, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

27 September 1941: Malta Convoy Attacked Repeatedly

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

SS Imperial Star

SS Imperial Star

‘OPERATION HALBERD’ LARGEST SUPPLY SHIP FOUNDERS

The largest supply ship in the latest Malta convoy was left foundering tonight after she was struck by torpedoes during a raid by Italian aircraft. SS Imperial Star is only ship to have been lost while on a large scale convoy to Malta since the beginning of the year. 

Air attacks on the convoy began at 1300 hrs when a formation of 12 Italian Cant and BR 20 bombers approached from the north at low altitude. Guns from the convoy ships and Fulmars from Ark Royal managed to destroy or drive off eight of the raiders; the remaining four attempted an attack without success. 

Then at 1330 hrs a second wave of raiders attacked out of the sun.  Six BR 20 bombers approached line abreast and despite heavy gunfire from the ships three managed to press home their attack, hitting the Nelson with a torpedo and reducing her speed to 15 knots; fortunately this was the convoy speed also so that she remained with the covering force. A third wave of enemy aircraft approached but did not make any attack

Then at 1430 hrs came a radio signal from Malta: two battleships, four cruisers and 16 destroyers of the Italian fleet were just 80 miles from the convoy and closing fast. Fleet commander Admiral Somerville prepared for an attack: Prince of Wales and Rodney, with cruisers Edinburgh and Sheffield escorted by six destroyers were sent out to intercept; Ark Royal also prepared an air strike. In rapidly deteriorating weather the two fleets missed each other.  With no prospect of engagement with the Italian fleet, the ships returned to the convoy and at 1900 hrs the main force of the Mediterranean Fleet turned west to return to Gibraltar as planned. 

The Malta convoy with its close escort of five cruisers and nine destroyers continued its passage eastwards, taking the same route as the last convoy, ‘Operation Substance’, through the Skerki Channel close to the Sicilian coast. As the night skies cleared, Italian bombers relaunched their attacks, singly and in pairs.  Approaching low and fast to launch their torpedoes they were difficult to see against the dark sky. Cossack, Kenya, Oribi and the merchantman Rowallan Castle suffered near-misses.  The convoy ships took evasive action; two collided trying to dodge a torpedo, but another merchant ship was hit. 

SS Imperial Star was carrying 300 passengers as well as a large volume of supplies – was badly damaged, her engines stopped and her steering gear destroyed. HMS Heythrop took off the 300 troops and crew and HMS Oribi took Imperial Star in tow.  However, the 12000 ton merchant ship was too heavy for the destroyer and was unable to make way. Imperial Star was now low in the water and drifting towards the coast of Sicily and the decision was made to sink her.  The remainder of the crew was taken off and Oribi laid depth charges to sink her.  However, despite this and repeated shelling the merchant ship remained afloat and had to be abandoned.  There were no casualties on Imperial Star but three Fleet Air Arm pilots were killed defending the convoy.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 27 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 28 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Cloudy.

No air raids.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY  SS Port Chalmers and City of Pretoria sailed for Gibraltar at 1100 hrs.

AIR HQ 2 Blenheims on convoy escort; 1 Blenheim anti-submarine patrol. 69 Squadron Marylands reconnaissance Palermo, Cape Carbonara, Sicily, Sardinia, east Sicilian coast and special patrols and searches.  1 Blenheim on anti-submarine patrol. 105 Squadron 6 Blenheims sent to attack Porto Empedocle; 4 returned due to bad weather, the remaining two carried out the attack. 185 Squadron 6 Hurricane fighters and 6 Hurricane fighter-bombers attacked Comiso aerodrome three times, dropping 5140lbs of bombs and setting fire to several buildings and aircraft. 252 Squadron 2 Beaufighters attacked Marsala seaplane base. 272 Squadron 6 Beaufighters attacked the seaplane base at Cagliara.  2 Beaufighters attacked Borizzo aerodrome.  3 Beaufighters on patrol over Trapani against e-boats. 

TA QALI  Sergeants Mess in New Camp taken over.

4th Bn THE BUFFS (ROYAL EAST KENT REGIMENT)  Battalion route march; the column was headed by the Battalion drums.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 27, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

25 September 1941: Largest Supply Convoy Yet Embarks for Malta

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

A photo-reconnaissance Spitfire flew the route to Malta

A PR Spitfire flew the route to Malta

NINE MERCHANT SHIPS PLUS 27 STRONG ESCORT FOR ‘OPERATION HALBERD’

The largest supply convoy yet for Malta began its journey today through the western Mediterranean. Under ‘Operation Halberd’ nine merchant ships: Ajax, Breconshire, City of Calcutta, City of Lincoln, Clan Ferguson, Clan Macdonald, Dunedin Star, Imperial Star and Rowallan Castle are carrying over 80000 tons of supplies and hundreds of troops for the Island.

The ships for Malta, and their escort from the Navy’s Home Fleet sailed on 17 September from the Clyde for Gibraltar, where the convoy assembled yesterday. The merchant ships will be protected in the Mediterranean by the most powerful force assembled for a convoy to date, including three battleships, five cruisers, 18 destroyers and aircraft carrier Ark Royal carrying aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm to provide air cover.

Nothing has been left to chance. A photo-reconnaissance Spitfire flew the entire route from the UK to Malta to provide a detailed report on the position of the entire Italian navy before the convoy left Gibraltar.  The Spitfire landed safely in Malta on Monday.

In order to mislead the Italian fleet, the escorting vessels have divided into two groups; the supply ships taking the usual southern route within sight of the Algerian coast, with the normal Naval escort. However the remainder of the escort, a powerful fleet, is heading northwards, close to the Balearic Islands, hopefully undetected.  The aim is to lure Italian warships into battle unaware of the full strength of the escort fleet, and leaving sufficient Naval ships free to escort the merchantmen safely onward to Malta.  Also at sea are nine submarines, including six of Malta’s 10th Flotilla positioned along the convoy route ready to intercept any Italian warships.

The first convoy ships sailed westwards out of Gibraltar yesterday. Under cover of darkness they reversed course and passed through the Straits at 0130 hrs this morning.  Just after 0900 hrs the two groups of warships divided and the supply convoy began its journey eastwards through the Mediterranean towards Malta. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 25 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 26 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine.

2356-0015 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the Island and drop high explosive and incendiary bombs eight miles off the west coast before receding to the west.

0032-0055 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy aircraft which approaches to within eight miles of the Island, drops bombs in the sea off Dingli and recedes to the south west. Two Hurricanes are scrambled but there are no searchlight illuminations and no engagement.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ Arrivals 1 Maryland, 2 Wellington. 69 Squadron  1 Blenheim patrol eastern Sicilian coast and Crotone. 38 Squadron 9 Wellingtons attacked motor transport yards and barracks in Tripoli. 105 Squadron 5 Blenheims attacked lorry convoys east of Sirte. 107 Squadron 2 Blenheims attacked transport near Beurat.  1 Blenheim attacked a convoy. 

TA QALI  4 sergeant pilots proceeded by Hurricane to the Middle East.

2nd Bn DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT  Demonstration by one platoon of A Company of attack showing the use of all weapons including small arms fire and live mortar bombs.

3rd Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  A Company detached one Sergeant and 12 men to form three anti-aircraft light machine-gun posts at Luqa aerodrome.

(1) Red Duster White Ensign, Ian Cameron, Futura 1975

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 25, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

22 September 1941: Malta Free French Air Crew Killed on Spy Mission

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R)

Free French F/Sgt Georges Blaize (1)

Free French F/Sgt Georges Blaize (1)

SPECIAL OPERATIONS HEINKEL CRASHES INTO SEA

The Heinkel 115 used for clandestine operations from Malta crashed today with the loss of the crew and one passenger. The Heinkel which has been at Kalafrana since June took off just after midnight for its latest secret mission but appears to have got into difficulties and was forced to make an emergency landing on the sea, some 20 miles off the coast of the Island. 

The crew have been named as Free French pilot F/Sgt Georges Blaize and flight engineer Sgt Raoul Gatien. Also on board and acting as observer was Fleet Air Arm S/Lt Reginald Drake, who was attached to Naval air station HMS Grebe in Egypt but operating from Malta. 

Rescue aircraft and the high speed launch from Malta set out to search for the stricken aircraft. They found wreckage strewn over the sea and the bodies of S/Lt Drake and F/Sgt Blaize.  There was no trace of Sgt Gatien.

The Heinkel is the second aircraft to be lost on Special Operations from Malta; last Tuesday a Swordfish crashed while transporting a secret agent to North Africa. Only yesterday Malta’s Governor and Commander in Chief referred to the Heinkel as the only aircraft based on the Island dedicated to the service of the Defence Security Officer (maltagc70.com 21 September 1941). The Heinkel, which still carried its German markings, was stored under cover at Kalafrana and used only at night.

PILOT NURSES DAMAGED AIRCRAFT THROUGH 200 MILE FLIGHT

A Blenheim pilot landed his badly damaged aircraft at Luqa airfield today after a tense 218 mile flight across the Mediterranean. Sergeant Williams’ Blenheim was one of six sent to attack German barrack blocks and fuel dumps at Homs in North Africa.  During the attack Pilot Wing Commander D W Scivier AFC made a sharp turn, coming up underneath Sgt Williams, whose aircraft propellers sliced through the fuselage of W/Cdr Scivier’s Blenheim, which plunged into a steep dive and crashed with the loss of the entire crew. 

Sgt Williams’ Blenheim was also badly damaged in the collision. He managed to keep the plane airborne and nursed it gently back to Malta.  Sgt Williams and his crew, observer Sgt R Scholefield and wireless operator/air gunner Sgt A Tuppen are being treated for shock.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 23 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Heavy rain mid-day.

0153-0214 hrs  Air raid alert for one enemy aircraft which approaches the Island but does not cross the coast. Bombs are dropped in the sea eight miles from shore.

0338-0355 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy aircraft which crosses the coast over Dingli, drops bombs on Balzan causing two slight casualties and damage to houses before turning south over Luqa and receding, dropping more bombs in the sea off Delimara.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Georges Blaize, Royal Air Force; Sub-Lieutenant Reginald G Drake, Royal Navy; Flight Sergeant Raoul Gatien, Royal Air Force; Leading Airman Kenneth Pimlott, HMS St.Angelo; Flight Sergeant Leonard Martin Barnett, observer, Royal Air Force, 105 Squadron; Sergeant Brian Gray BFM, wireless operator/air gunner, Royal Air Force, 105 Squadron; Wing Commander Donald William Scivier AFC, pilot, Royal Air Force, 105 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ Arrivals 1 Spitfire, 1 Sunderland. Departures 2 Wellington. 38 Squadron 3 Wellingtons attacked a liner.  5 Wellingtons attacked motor transport depots near Tripoli.  Sgt Secomb failed to return. 69 Squadron 1 Maryland patrol east Tunisian coast.  1 Maryland photoreconnaissance Catania, Gerbini, Comiso.  1 Maryland on search for a convoy. 105 Squadron 6 Blenheims attacked barrack blocks and fuel dumps at Homs. 107 Squadron 5 Blenheims attacked barrack blocks and fuel dumps at Misurata. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 4 Swordfish attacked convoy off Kuriat, firing two torpedoes hitting one merchant ship amidships and another in the bows.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The Battalion was visited by a representative of the Times of Malta who took photographs and interviewed officers and men. He also watched various types of training going on in the Battalion.  Weapons training courses are underway: in time all ranks will have fired the rifle and also whichever automatic weapon they are most likely to use in battle.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 0; dealt with 3 (2kg incendiary).

(1)  See also website: Les Francais Libres

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 22, 2016 in 1941, September 1941, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , ,

17 September 1941: Malta Faces Acute Water Shortage

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

Two Blenheims lost today

Two Blenheims lost today

MILITARY UNITS WARNED TO CUT USAGE OR FACE CUT OFF

The water situation in Malta is now acute. In spite of repeated orders on the subject, it appears that certain military units are still greatly exceeding the authorised limit of 12 gallons per head, per day.

The Governor and Commander in Chief has issued an urgent personal appeal to the fighting services requesting their co-operation in ensuring that water consumption is kept to a minimum. Commanding Officers of all units are ordered to take the necessary steps to ensure that the limit is not exceeded in future.  If this does not happen, troops are warned that the water supply of the offending unit will be cut off during certain hours.  

TWO BLENHEIMS LOST IN ATTACK ON CONVOY

Two Blenheim aircraft and their crews were lost today during an attack on Axis shipping. The Blenheims were among four sent to attack a convoy of the coast of Tunisia heading towards Tripoli.  The Blenheims swooped for a low level attack on a schooner.  Pilot F/Sgt J Bendall’s aircraft collided with the schooner’s mast and crashed into the sea.  The pilot and his crew, wireless operator/air gunner Sgt A Brown and observer Sgt C Hill were all killed instantly.

The second Blenheim of P/O Peter Robinson was hit by anti-aircraft fire and burst into flames, killing all three of the crew including observer Sgt B F Brooks and wireless operator/air gunner Sgt F Burrell.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 17 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 18 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

No air raids.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Jack Bendall, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 105 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Alexander Brown, RAF, 105 Squadron; Sergeant Charles H Hill, RAFVR, 105 Squadron; Sergeant Bernard F Brooks, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Sergeant Frank Burrell, RAF, 107 Squadron; Pilot Officer Peter E C Robinson, RAFVR, 107 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ  Arrivals 1 Blenheim, 1 Wellington. Departures 1 Sunderland, 1 Wellington. 38 Squadron 5 Wellingtons attacked Tripoli. 69 Squadron Marylands special patrol, photoreconnaissance Catania, Gerbini, Comiso; Blenheim special search. 105 Squadron 1 Blenheim searched for Swordfish aircraft.  4 Blenheims attacked a convoy.  P/O Robinson and Sgt Bendall failed to return. 107 Squadron 5 Blenheims attacked Licata. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 6 Swordfish attacked a southbound convoy off Marittimo hitting one merchant vessel and slowing the convoy.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 2.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 17, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , ,

12 September 1941: Kings Own Malta Regiment Defend Luqa

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE 

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

ack-ack-gunners-malta cropMALTESE BATTALION TO MAN KEY ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUNS

The 3rd Battalion Kings Own Malta Regiment has been asked to man anti-aircraft gun positions to help protect Luqa aerodrome from attack.  One Sergeant and 12 men will form three anti-aircraft light machine-gun posts at the aerodrome.  The four-men crews will each man an anti-aircraft Bren gun from morning ‘stand to’ to evening ‘stand down’, and during daylight air observations.   The crews will be stood down overnight.  Stone sangars will be constructed for each location and lined with sandbags to form a secure gun position. 

KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT LAUNCH FUND FOR DISTRESSED FAMILIES

The Kings Own Malta Regiment have voted unanimously to establish a Regimental Distress Fund to help soldiers whose families are affected by enemy bombing. The object of the fund is to accumulate an amount from which small sums can be paid to serving soldiers who through enemy action suffer damage or loss to their household belongings.  It is intended to assist afflicted families in obtaining immediate necessaries such as beds, blankets, cooking utensils and clothing.  Each Battalion and the Static Group will make an intitial contribution of £30.  Voluntary contributions will be made on a sliding scale from 10/- per month by a Colonel/Lt Colonel down to 2d per month by a regular soldier.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 13 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

No air raids.

Military casualties Squadron Leader Frederick R H Charney, DFC, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 105 Squadron; Sergeant Donald R Harris, RAFVR, 105 Squadron; Sergeant Sidney Porteous, RAFVR, 105 Squadron; Sergeant Joseph E Mortimer, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Flying Officer Charles D Owen, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Sergeant Douglas J Reid, RAFVR, 107 Squadron.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY Operation Status Phase II postponed. HM Submarine Utmost departed to search for the crew of a downed Blenheim.

AIR HQ  Arrivals 1 Sunderland, 5 Wellington. Departures 1 Sunderland, 1 Wellington. 38 Squadron 7 Wellingtons attacked a convoy approaching Tripoli. 69 Squadron Photo reconnaissance Taranto, Messina, Palermo. 105 Squadron 1 Blenheim special patrol.  8 Blenheims attacked a convoy.  S/Ldr Charney’s Blenheim was shot down in flames, S/Ldr Sgt Brandwood and Sgt Mortimer failed to return. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 7 Swordfish attacked a convoy setting a tanker and a merchant vessel on fire.  One Fulmar on offensive patrol over Catania and Gerbini aerodromes dropped high explosives and incendiaries on Gerbini and machine-gunned both aerodromes. 

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 2.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 12, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

10 September 1941: Malta Pilots Receive Military Honours

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R)

PILOTS’ AWARDS ANNOUNCED IN LONDON

Awards have been announced today for three pilots for their service while based in Malta.  F/O Warburton has been given a second military honour in recognition of his service as a reconnaissance pilot. The official announcement came today of a Bar to add to the Distinguished Flying Cross he was awarded in January.

London Gazette, 9 September 1941: The King has been graciously pleased to approve the following awards in recognition of gallantry displayed in flying operations against the enemy:

F/O Adrian Warburton

F/O Adrian Warburton

Flying Officer Adrian Warburton DFC, No 69 Squadron

“This officer is a most determined and skilful pilot and has carried out 125 operational missions. Flying Officer Warburton has never failed to complete the missions he has undertaken and, in the actions fought, he has destroyed at least three hostile aircraft in combat and another three on the ground.”

Flying Officer Roger Drew, No 69 Squadron

“In July 1941, this officer carried out an attack on the aerodrome at Zuara. Aircraft on the ground were machine-gunned, one being destroyed and others damaged.  Flying Officer Drew has also been responsible for the destruction of three Italian flying boats.  He has completed 120 operational flights, including a number of reconnaissances, and throughout he has displayed skill and enthusiasm.”

Pilot Officer Jack Buckley, 105 Squadron

“In August 1941, this officer attacked a 9000 ton merchant ship off Lampedusa. Destroyers, torpedo boats and a large number of lighters were removing a cargo of motor transport at the time but Pilot Officer Buckley attacked through a curtain of fire and, although wounded during the run-in, scored hits setting the ship on fire.  Subsequent reconnaissance revealed that a 700 ton sloop was also sunk as a result of the attack.”

DANGEROUS UXBS AT DINGLI

A new type of Italian high explosive bomb has come to light in Malta. Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal Officer Lt G Carroll first encountered the bomb when he was called out to Dingli by one of his NCOs. 

“His squad had revealed the first of two small bombs, six feet under the narrow strip of fertile farmland overlooking the sea, below the Island’s radar station. The NCO did not recognise the bomb. Lt Carroll climbed down the ladder to take a look: from its size he estimated it at 50kg, but from its markings it was Italian – and certainly not one he had seen before.  The NCO had reported that the bomb’s base fuze was broken – so with any luck it might be harmless.  But if the central part of the fuze was still in place, it could be in a highly-sensitive condition.  Lt Carroll’s worst fears were confirmed: any attempt to take out this fuze could detonate the bomb.  Better to set a charge himself and have a controlled explosion.  He looked up: no luck.  They were too close to the radar station, especially if the second bomb went up as well.  What if that one could be got out of the way first?

Lt Carroll walked across to take a look: the lads were making good progress and the bomb was already exposed. He climbed six feet down the ladder into the shaft and squatted down beside the bomb: another damaged fuze.  Now he had two bombs that were too unstable to move.  Nor could they be exploded this close to the radar station.  He had just one more option – but it meant putting himself at risk.  The entire base plate would have to be unscrewed from each bomb.  It was possible, but it had to be done without disturbing the broken fuze.  And twice. 

He gave the order for the men to retreat. This was a job for the Bomb Disposal Officer alone.  As soon as his Sergeant signalled that they were out of range, Lt Carroll began to unscrew the base plate of the first bomb, taking care to avoid touching the vulnerable fuze. Grasping it firmly, he gently eased it away from the carcass and climbed the ladder with his prize.  Soon the second base plate was off and Lt Carroll could afford to relax.  However, there was the matter of yet another unknown bomb to consider.  He ordered the parts of both bombs to be carried back to Lintorn Barracks.  He had a report to write.” (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

No air raids.

Civilian casualties  Rabat  Emmanuel Bartoli, age 55; Carmel Borg, age 61.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 1941

AIR HQ  38 Squadron 8 Wellingtons attacked power station, train and ferries at Messina. 69 Squadron Reconnaissance Tripoli, plus special search and patrol.  

TA QALI  4 officers and 9 sergeants left for Luqa by Hurricane to proceed to the Middle East.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  1900-0730 hrs Brigade Exercise: an ‘attack’ was made on the Battalion sector. Carriers and mobile platoons did excellent work and the whole area was well covered by fie from our static posts.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 0; dealt with 3 (2 x 50kg; 1 x 12kg anti-personnel)

11th Bn LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS  The Battalion participated in a Brigade exercise, attacking the defended positions on the Cottonera Lines held by 1st Bn Cheshire Regiment.

(1) UXB Malta, S A M Hudson, History Press 2010/2012

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 10, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

4 September 1941: Malta Defenders Destroy 12 Enemy Aircraft in 24 Hours

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE 

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

air combatSIX MACCHI FIGHTERS DESTROYED IN DAYLIGHT RAID

Malta’s defenders shot down a total of 11 enemy aircraft today in just three engagements. Mid-morning a large formation of 20 Macchi fighters approached the Island.  21 Hurricanes in total (twelve of 126 Squadron and nine of 185 Squadron) were scrambled and intercepted the raiders when they were still some distance north of Grand Harbour. 

F/Lt Jeffries spotted a Macchi circling at 19000 feet 30 miles off the coast and led his section of 185 Squadron in the attack. The Macchi was last seen diving vertically towards the sea.  Four Macchi fighters then counter-attack but the Hurricanes manage to evade them. 

126 Squadron engaged the raiders at 20 miles off the coast. S/Ldr Rabagliati attacked two Macchis, reporting one spinning down towards the sea emitting smoke.  P/O Burke attacked two Macchis in turn, claiming hits on both; one was seen diving down towards the sea.  F/O Carpenter engaged three Macchis at high altitude, shooting one down. P/O Russell and F/Lt Lefevre attacked and shot down one Macchi apiece.  Three enemy parachutes were observed descending towards the sea; a fourth Italian also baled out but his parachute did not open. 

One Macchi only crossed the coast, flying at low altitude over Kalafrana and Hal Far. Bofors gun positions launched a fierce barrage and the Macchi was last seen losing height over Dingli Cliffs.

This afternoon it was the turn of Malta fighters to go on the offensive. Eight Hurricanes of 249 Squadron headed for Cape Passero on the southernmost point of Sicily, where a formation of twelve Macchi fighters had been reported in the air.  It became clear that the Macchis were protecting a hospital aircraft which was flying at sea level.  The Hurricanes launched an attack and a fierce dogfight ensued, during which three Macchis were destroyed, plus one probable, and two damaged.  Two Hurricanes were shot down; P/O G V Smith and Sgt J C Kimberley are missing.  The Hurricanes turned back towards Malta with the Macchis following close on their tails.  One Hurricane was hit by a bullet during the return flight but otherwise all remaining aircraft returned safely.  Speaking after the engagement, S/Ldr Barton said, “This is the toughest engagement I have experienced to date: the Macchis just stayed and fought.” 

Then in the early hours of this morning two enemy bombers took advantage of the approach of Wellington bombers to reach the Island without interception. High explosive bombs were dropped in the sea and incendiaries over Kalafrana and Marsaxlokk before two Malta night fighters can intercept.  Searchlights illuminate one of the bombers and the Hurricanes engage, shooting it down in flames into the sea, to “the cheers of half of Malta” according to one eye-witness.  Two crew members were seen to bale out of the bomber but after a thorough search only one could be found and rescued.

The bombers in tonight’s raid were later identified as Cant Z 1007s. This is the first known incident of the bomber being used in night raids over Malta.  

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 5 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

1043-1115 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 Macchi 200 fighters approaching the Island. 12 Hurricanes 126 Squadron are scrambled and attack the formation 20 miles north of Grand Harbour, shooting down four Macchis and damaging another.  Nine Hurricanes 185 Squadron also engage the raiders out to sea, shooting down one. One Macchi crosses the coast and flies over the Island at low altitude.  Bofors gun positions at Kalafrana and Hal Far engage, both claiming hits, and the Macchi is observed losing height over Dingli Cliffs.

1546 hrs  Eight Hurricanes of 249 Squadron engage 12 Macchi 200 fighters five miles off Cape Passero. Three Macchis are destroyed, plus one probable, and two damaged.  Two Hurricanes are shot down; P/O Smith and Sgt Kimberley are reported missing.  The Macchis follow the Hurricanes back towards Malta.  One Hurricane is struck by a bullet during the return flight. 

0443-0530 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the Island with incoming Wellington bombers. The raiders drop high explosive bombs in the sea at Delimara Point, and incendiaries over Kalafrana and in fields near Marsaxlokk.  Searchlights illuminate a bomber which is engaged by Hurricane fighters and shot down in flames into the sea. Two crew bale out; one wounded man is rescued and taken prisoner.  The bomber is later identified as a Cant Z1007, the first time that this type has been identified over Malta at night.

Military casualties  Sergeant John E Jones, wireless operator/air gunner, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Sergeant Lewis D Parry, observer, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Sergeant Walter H Wallace, pilot, RAFVR, 107 Squadron; Sergeant James C Kimberley, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR), 249 Squadron; Pilot Officer George V Smith, Royal Air Force, 249 Squadron.

Enemy casualties  Pilot Sergente Luigi Contarini, 90a Squadriglia, 10o Gruppo, 4o Stormo; Pilot Sottotenente Andrea Della Pasqua, 9o Gruppo, 4o Stormo; Pilot Tenente Colonello Carlo Romagnoli, Tenente Colonello, Commander of 10o Gruppo, 4o Stormo.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY  Unbeaten returned from patrol in Straits of Messina having sunk a schooner Q ship.  Vichy convoys and a hospital ship were sighted but nothing else.

AIR HQ  Arrivals 1 Sunderland. 69 Squadron Reconnaissance of Kerkennah area, western Ionian Sea and Tripoli.  Two Fulmars patrolled Catania, Gerbini and Comiso; bombs dropped on Comiso and Catania. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm Three Swordfish, two with torpedoes and one with a mine, left for Tripoli to attack shipping outside harbour. No shipping was located but a mine was laid outside the harbour; torpedoes were not released.  38 Squadron 13 Wellingtons attacked motor transport depot destroying several buildings and starting fires. 105 Squadron 5 Blenheims attacked shipping and port facilities Crotone Harbour.  Enemy fire blew off the wing of Sgt Wallace’s Blenheim and the aircraft crashed, killing the crew. 

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The Battalion held a defence scheme exercise in conjunction with the Fortress Royal Engineers and troops of 11th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers.  ‘Enemy parachute troops’ attacked targets in Corrodino, the Dockyard, Floriana and Valletta.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 3; dealt with 37 (1 x 500kg; 36 x 2kg incendiary).

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 4, 2016 in 1941, September 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

1 September 1941: Malta is New Base for 10th Submarine Flotilla

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE 

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R)

RAID SUMMARY AUGUST 1941

  • No of air raid alerts 30
  • No of raids 25 (including 18 night raids)
  • Days without air raid alerts 15
  • Total time under alert 18 hours 38 mins
  • Average length of alert 38 mins
  • Civilians killed by enemy action 5; injured 5
  • Buildings destroyed/badly
HMS Upholder

HMS Upholder

FLOTILLA COMMAND AT MANOEL ISLAND

A new 10th Submarine Flotilla has been formed with its base at Malta.  ‘U’ Class submarines have been operating from the Island for some time, carrying out successful operations against enemy convoys.  These smaller submarines, such as Unbeaten, Upholder, Upright and Ursula, have been found to be more suited to conditions in the Mediterranean.  Leading 10th Flotilla will be Commander George W G Simpson who has been appoint to the command of HMS Talbot, the submarine base at Manoel Island, Malta

AIR RAIDS DAWN 1 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 2 SEPTEMBER 1941

Weather  Fine and warm.

1039-1110 hrs  Air raid alert for twelve Macchi 200 fighters which approach from the north and cross the coast over St Paul’s Bay without dropping any bombs. Selected gun emplacements fire pointer rounds.  Hurricane fighters are scrambled but do not engage.

2111-2206 hrs  Air raid alert for six enemy bombers which approach singly from the north east and drop incendiary bombs plus a small number of high explosives across Marsa, Hamrun, Gudja, Pembroke Ranges and Island Bay, and in the sea north of St George’s. High explosive bombs are dropped on Pembroke Ranges.  One bomb falls on a tennis court at Sliema.  Four people are slightly wounded in the raid.  It is believed that they did not go into a shelter.  Three Hurricanes are scrambled; no interceptions.  P/O Robertson crashes on landing; he is unhurt. 

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 1941

ROYAL NAVY  5 Swordfish searched area to eastward for northbound convoy without success. Upholder returned from interception of convoy east of Tripoli.  Convoy sighted and attacked without success.

AIR HQ  Arrivals 2 Beaufighter, 5 Blenheim. Departures 2 Beaufighter, 1 Sunderland. 69 Squadron Reconnaissance east Tunisian coast.   Special search by Blenheim.  2 Fulmars offensive patrol Gerbini-Comiso area dropped incendiaries on Gerbini and Augusta. 38 Squadron 7 Wellingtons attacked Tripoli power station dropped bombs and incendiaries causing damage and fires. 105 Squadron 7 Blenheims attacked chemical works, ship and railway in southern Calabria.  5 Hurricanes fitted with cannon despatched on a special railway patrol near Pozallo Railway Station.  They dived on a train and attacked from the rear, hitting the engine and driver’s cabin.  Coaches in the station were also hit.  Machine-gun fire retaliated from both sides of the line; Sgt Parker’s windscreen was hit by one bullet.   

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  The Battalion took over 4 Bren carriers. They will undergo 2 weeks’ maintenance training under the Malta Tank Troops billeted by us, before being used in C Company sector.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 5; dealt with 3 (2kg incendiary)

MALTA SIGNALS COMPANY  14 other ranks disembarked and posted to SWS Malta.

ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS  Strengths 25 officers, 8 WO1, 189 other ranks.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 1, 2016 in 1941, September 1941, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

30 August 1941: Malta Aircraft Drop 200 Tons of Bombs on Tripoli

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE  

Get daily updates direct to your computer – sign up to follow maltagc70 (see R) 

bombing North AfricaAIR HQ MALTA REPORTS ON THE MONTH’S OPERATIONS     

During the month the Marylands and photoreconnaissance Hurricanes of 69 Squadron have covered the Italian convoy routes daily and have also made frequent reconnaissances of Sicilian and southern Calabrian ports and aerodromes, and of Tripoli. As a result of these reconnaissances and a study of the excellent photographs obtained Wellingtons of 38 Squadron have carried out 15 raids on Tripoli and two raids on Catania.  During the month over 200 tons of bombs have been dropped on Tripoli alone and have caused considerable damage to shipping and harbour installations.  One Wellington failed to return from a raid over Tripoli.

Blenheims of 105 Squadron have carried out 23 operations, all except two of them against enemy shipping. Considerable damage was caused to chemical works at Crotone and to storage tanks and factories at Licata.  Five aircraft have been lost but the crew of one are known to be prisoners.

Swordfish of 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm have carried out 16 operations, 13 of which have been most successful. Twice they have bombed the submarine base at Augusta and once shipping at Catania.

Hurricanes (cannon-loaded) of 126 Squadron have attacked floatplanes at Syracuse and balloons at Augusta with considerable success.

On 14 nights, Fulmars have operated over aerodromes in southern Sicily, dropping small bombs and carrying out machine-gun attacks; on one occasion at least five aircraft being burnt out at Gerbini. These intruder operations have frequently disturbed the Italian night flying routine.

No 126 Squadron has carried out 19 scrambles during the month, 249 Squadron has carried out 34 and 105 Squadron 36. The newly-formed Malta Night Flying Unit has had 17 scrambles and has shot down 4 enemy aircraft confirmed.  There have been a total of 12 enemy aircraft confirmed destroyed, three probables and one damaged during the month, against the loss of one Hurricane and pilot.

It is probable that the Italians have been operating without German assistance during the month. There have been six day alerts and 18 night alerts, on 15 of which bombs were dropped, approximately half of them incendiary.  It is interesting to note that on at least two occasions a ‘hang up’ of these incendiary containers has resulted in the enemy aircraft catching fire and being destroyed.  Little damage has been done by air raids, and none to service property; there have been no service casualties.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 AUGUST TO DAWN 31 AUGUST 1941

Weather  Sunny and hot.

No air raids.

Military casualties  Sergeant William F Butler, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR); Sergeant Thomas P Butterfield, RAFVR; Sergeant Maurice H Cope, RAFVR; Sergeant Donald R A Garrick, RAFVR; Sergeant David D Todd, RAF.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 30 AUGUST 1941

AIR HQ  Arrivals 5 Wellington. 69 Squadron Marylands reconnaissance Tripoli.  Special patrol sighted two passenger liners 110 miles south of Malta steering south eat. 38 Squadron 9 Wellingtons despatched to attack shipping and specified targets in Tripoli in 3 waves.  Several bombs struck the target area, causing fires and damage to buildings. 105 Squadron 6 Blenheims sent to attack a power station and chemical factory at Licata score hits on buildings and large fires.  The attack was a complete surprise and there was no opposition.   

HAL FAR  One Fulmar patrolled over Comiso and Gerbini but low cloud prevented any attack. Four bombs were dropped on barracks at Pozzallo, starting a fire. 830 Squadron Fleet Air Arm 5 Swordfish on anti-shipping search located a 1500 ton merchant vessel 20 miles west of Lampedusa and scored a hit with one torpedo and probably a second.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB reported 1

ROYAL ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS  Strength of detachment 27 officers, 192 other ranks.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed. For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 30, 2016 in 1941, August 1941

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,