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11-17 October 1942: The Blitz is Back

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11 October 1942:  31 Civilians Killed – 17 in Tarxien

Malta was rocked today by heavy bombing raids for the first time three months, as the enemy sent 58 bombers with massed fighter escorts over the Island.  The attacks mark a return to blitz conditions not seen since the end of April 1942.  This time Malta’s Spitfires were airborne in force to counter-attack, destroying eight of the enemy bombers and seven of their fighters.

Heavy Ack Ack also engaged the raiders but with ammunition restrictions at 15 rounds per gun per day due to lack of stocks the Gunners were unable to provide a deterrent to raiders equal to previous months.  The Army has increased the number of men assisting on the aerodromes to 350 daily, to service aircraft and clear damaged runways to keep Malta’s defenders in the air.

The communique from Allied HQ Cairo states: “There was an increase in air activity over Malta yesterday heavily-escorted bombers carried out five attacks during the day. Our fighters engaged them on every occasion. They destroyed at least 15 enemy aircraft, and a great many more were damaged. We lost one fighter. The Malta air craft is the only Allied plane missing from all these operations.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 OCTOBER TO DAWN 12 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; cloudy about mid-day.

0715 hrs  Air raid alert.  Spitfires of 1435 and 126 Squadrons Luqa are scrambled and intercept nine JU 88s with a large fighter escort approaching Malta from the north. As enemy fighters try to fend them off 126 Squadron attacks and P/O Stevenson destroys one Macchi 202 and F/O Smith destroys one JU 88.  F/S Varey probably destroys one ME 109 and damages one; Sgt Yeatman damages one ME 109, Sgt Marshall one JU 88 and Sgt Tiddy one Macchi 202.  1435 Squadron P/O Walton damages one JU 88 and Sgt Hamilton one ME 109. One Spitfire 1435 Squadron is damaged: pilot unhurt.

Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are also scrambled to intercept.  As they go in to attack enemy bombers they are jumped by escorting fighters: no results.

0719 hrs   Six JU 88s escorted by 30 fighters approached from the south east of Malta to attack Hal Far by shallow dive.  They drop bombs on Benghaisa PT and Hal Far, damaging GHQ, a coal dump and motor transport.

0725 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a bomber crashed in the sea near to defence post RA 3.

0755 hrs  All clear.

0800-0955  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are dispatched to act as escort for the High Speed Launch: no enemy aircraft approach.

0945 hrs  Six JU 88 bombers escorted by 65 fighters are reported approaching the Island.  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  They locate six bombers with twenty fighters and are instructed to attack top cover from up sun.  F/Lt Roscoe destroys one ME 109; Sgt Miller damages one.

0950 hrs  Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far to intercept and engage enemy aircraft: no claims.

1009 hrs  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  1435 Squadron S/L Lovell and P/O Walton each damage one ME 109.

1009-1105 hrs  Air raid alert.  The six JU 88 bombers with their remaining fighter escort cross the coast between 18000 and 3000 feet and drop bombs on Lija, Balzan and Birkirkara on the way to Ta Qali.  The JU 88s attempt to drop 20-30 high explosive bombs on the airfield’s runway but overshoot the target, then split up as they recede.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.

1230 hrs  Eight JU 88s escorted by 50 fighters approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept the raiders and launch a head-on attack on the eight JU 88s escorted by 25 fighters.  W/Cdr Donaldson destroys one JU 88 and damages one ME 109; F/Sgt Ballantyne destroys one ME 109; P/O Nash damages one Macchi 202.

Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled from Hal Far.  They locate one JU 88 with fighter escort and engage: P/O Park damages one RE 2001.

1325 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron are scrambled: one Spitfire 126 Squadron is damaged and crash-lands: the pilot is unhurt.  1435 Squadron F/Lt McLeod and F/Sgt MacLennan each damage two ME 109s; Sgt Williams and Sgt Jarrett each damage one; P/O Park damages one Re 2001.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged in combat: Sgt Jarrett is slightly hurt.

1400 hrs  The eight JU 88s with fighter escort drop bombs on Ta Qali aerodrome and dispersal areas, and on Rabat, causing damage to property and civilian casualties.  Three Spitfires are slightly damaged and one written off.

1420 hrs  Raiders passed.

A formation of 16 enemy raiders is seen to the north of the Islands but are too far away for identification.  As they approach, they are discovered to be single-engined aircraft with retractable undercarriage and are at first thought to be a new type of JU 87.

1625 hrs  40 German and Italian fighters approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and attack enemy fighters north of St Paul’s Bay.  F/Lt Glazebrook and F/Sgt Ballantyne each destroy one Macchi 202.  Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far: W/Cdr Thompson, Sgt Gore and P/O Reid each destroy one ME 109.   Spitfires of 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled: W/Cdr Hanks damages one ME 109 and S/Ldr Wicks one Macchi 202; F/Lt Reels probably destroys one Re 2001 and damages one; F/O Wallace damages one Macchi 202.  One Spitfire is damaged; the pilot is unhurt.  One Spitfire and pilot Sgt MacLean are reported missing.

1630 hrs  Air raid alert.  Bombs are dropped on Mellieha Ridge.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

1700 hrs  4th Bn The Buffs Beat the Retreat in Rabat Square in the presence of His Excellency the Governor.

1720 hrs  Raiders passed.

1735 hrs  Thirty unescorted JU 88s approach the Island.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage 15 JU 88s.  P/O Nash and F/Sgt Ballantyne each destroy one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson and F/Lt Parkinson each probably destroy one.

1745 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept: F/Lt McLeod and Sgt MacLennan each destroy two JU 88s and Sgt Kebble one; Sgt Ree damages two JU 88s.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged: the pilots are unhurt.

1800 hrs  The remaining JU 88s drop bombs on Hal Far, Luqa, Tarxien and Qormi, destroying houses and causing civilian casualties. One Beaufighter is burned out the ground on Luqa aerodrome.  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report two planes down in the sea north of defence post RA 3.

In Tarxien, personnel of HQ Company, 2nd Bn Devonshire Regt help to put out fires.  Bombs are dropped in Mqabba and Gudja camp areas.  One Other Rank of 1st Bn Hampshire Regt is injured by an incendiary bomb.  Searchlights effect ten illuminations, in one case illuminating three planes simultaneously.  225 Light Ack Ack Battery engage one JU 88 at 4000 feet.

1810-1820 hrs  1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report anti-personnel bombs between D Company HQ and Ta Ingrau, near Della Grazia and 150 yards south of Fort Ta Silch.  A Company send 40 men to extinguish a fire at Ta Belebel area.  CQMS Rampling, A Company, is injured in the left thigh by a bomb in Tarxien.

1850 hrs  Raiders passed.  The Spitfires landing at Ta Qali have great difficulty due to a cratered runway.

2100-2130 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach but only one crosses the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Bombs are dropped in Birkirkara.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne: no engagements.  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a delayed action bomb exploding near Ta Ingrau.

0039-0100 hrs  One HE 111 flies over Malta and drops flares and delayed action bombs on Luqa runway.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  As the enemy raider heads turns to head for Sicily, a Beaufighter of 89 Squadron intercepts.  F/O Shipard and F/Sgt Oxley attack with bursts of cannon and machine gun fire and destroy the HE 111.

0245-0330 hrs  Six enemy bombers approach the Island.  One crosses the coast and drops anti-personnel bombs on the Luqa, Safi and Ghaxaq areas.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne to intercept but do not locate the raiders.

0400 hrs  Two delayed action bombs are discovered by 1st Bn Hampshire Regt west of Kirkop.

Porte des Bombes

0438-0621 hrs  Nine enemy bombers approach the Island, several crossing the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea north of Spinola, on Porte des Bombes, St Patrick’s and St Andrew’s, and north of St Paul’s Bay.  The Beaufighter 89 Squadron of F/O Shipard and F/Sgt Oxley shoots down one HE 111 in flames.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant David MacLean, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 126 Squadron; Gunner Lawrence Borg, 11th HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery, killed by enemy aircraft at Rabat.

Civilian casualties  Mtarfa  Paul Azzopardi, age 17.  Paola  Joseph Hockey, age 30; Rose Hockey, age 25; Doris Hockey, age 4.  Qormi  Joseph Cardona, age 76.  Rabat  Anthony Caruana, age 10; Angiolina Falzon, age 14; Joseph Fsadni, age 28; Maddalena Galea, age 28; Antonia Grixti, age 46; Peter Vella, age 64; Mary Zahra, age 44.  Tarxien  Concetta Attard, age 47; Joseph Baldacchino, age 36; Anthony Barbara, age 55; Antonia Camilleri, age 76; Maggie Cook, age 56; Joseph Debono, age 25; Lonza Debono, age 25; Joseph Degabriele, age 9; Calcedonio Farrugia, age 15; Emily Gleaves, age 28; Joseph Manicolo, age 44; Laurence Piscopo, age 24; Charles Porter, age 71; Edward Redman, age 64; Charles Salsero, age 3; Vincent Scerri, age 60; Mary Tabone, age 12.  Zebbug  Spiro Borg, age 25.  Zejtun  Carmel Grech, age 30.

Enemy casualties (known)  Unteroffizier Gunther Grams, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber shot down into the sea.  He was rescued ten miles north of Grand Harbour and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 11 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy escorted P 42 to sea for patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Beaufighters from Edcu; three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Liberator to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Three Spitfires damaged in combat crashed on aerodrome: pilots uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged in combat suffered engine failure on landing: pilot uninjured.  Two Spitfires shot down into the sea by enemy fighters: one pilot missing.

TA QALI  249 Squadron are stood down.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Bugles played at Zebbug where the George Cross was on show.

12 October 1942: 700 Raiders Over Malta in 60 Hours

In the 60 hours to 6 o’clock this evening Axis air forces have made 700 sorties against Malta.   However, the enemy onslaught has been at a heavy cost.  In the same period the Island’s Spitfires have destroyed 20 bombers and 22 fighters, probably destroyed 21 enemy aircraft and damaged another 59.  Wing Commander Donaldson is encouraged by the new RAF tactic of ‘forward interception’ – attacking raiders well before they reach Malta:

W/Cdr A H Donaldson

“It was the most spectacular sight I have ever seen.  The whole sky was filled with enemy aircraft in severe trouble!  I saw three flaming Junkers 88s and another three flaming ME 109s, and counted no less than ten parachutes descending slowly, three of them from a Junkers 88 I had shot down.  Two of my victims, a Junkers 88 and a ME 109 both burst into flames.” (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 OCTOBER TO DAWN 13 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mostly fair to cloudy.  Slight shower with lightning in the evening.

0540 hrs  Fifteen enemy bombers are reported approaching the Island in two waves, with an escort of 25 fighters each.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept, followed by eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far at 0550 hrs and three of 229 Squadron Ta Qali at 0555 hrs.

The Spitfires of 229 Squadron attack the first wave of seven JU 88s, forcing one to jettison its bombs in the sea.  F/Lt Glazebrook probably destroys one JU 88 and F/Sgt Ballantyne damages another.  The eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled and intercept five JU 88s and fighter escort.  Capt Kuhlmann probably destroys one ME 109; Sgt Vinall damages one JU 88.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.

0620 hrs  Air raid alert.  The first wave of raiders drops bombs on Ta Qali and Luqa, where aircraft are damaged on the ground.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron and six 126 Squadron Luqa are then scrambled to join the attack.  126 Squadron F/Lt Rolls and F/Sgt Lang each destroy one JU 88; Sgt Park destroys two.  One Spitfire 126 Squadron and pilot S/Ldr Wicks are reported missing.  1435 Squadron Sgt Williams, P/O Stewart and P/O Latimer each damage one JU 88; P/O Owen damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron are damaged: the pilots are unhurt.

0630 hrs  The second wave of bombers targets Hal Far, where one Spitfire is burned out and one Spitfire and two Hurricanes slightly damaged.  The eight Spitfires 249 Squadron engage seven JU 88s and their fighter escort, chasing them home.  Sgt/ Stead and S/Ldr Stephens destroy two ME 109s; S/Ldr Woods destroys one and probably destroys a JU 88 over the south Sicilian coast.  One Spitfire crashes into the sea: pilot escapes unhurt and awaits rescue.

0705-0850 hrs  Four Spitfires from Hal Far carry out a search but find nothing.  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron patrol locate the pilot in the sea and patrol above until he is picked up.

0738 hrs  All clear.

0814-0900 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS carry out a search for missing pilots.

0840 hrs  18 bombers approach the Island in two waves, accompanied by 25 fighters.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and intercept, causing five bombers to jettison their bombs in the sea and turn back.  W/Cdr Donaldson and P/O Reynolds destroys one JU 88; P/O Nash damages two and F/Lt Glazebrook damages one.  P/O Parkinson damages one BR 20 and F/Sgt Ballantyne probably destroys one Macchi 202.

0845 hrs  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and engage twelve enemy bombers with fighter escort.  F/O McElroy destroys one ME 109; F/Sgt Hiskens and F/Sgt De Lara probably destroy one JU 88.  Other Spitfires close in on six enemy fighters: F/L McEiroy turns towards the ME 109s and destroys one F/Sgt Hiskens probably destroys; F/O McElroy, P/O Sanderson and Sgt Stead damage one each before the Messerschmitts break off the fight.

0907 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight 1435 Squadron are scrambled and engage.  Sgt Park and F/O Wallace 126 Squadron each destroy one JU 88; F/Lt Rolls destroys one Macchi 202 and probably destroys another; F/Sgt Bush and P/O Bazalgette each damage one JU 88.  1435 Squadron Sgt Mclennan destroys one ME 109.  One Spitfire crashes but the pilot is unhurt.  Heavy Ack Ack also engage.

0910 hrs  Bombs are dropped on Luqa, damaging aircraft on the ground, and at Ta Qali.  Bombs and incendiaries also fall at Bir-id-Dehen, Zeitun and Safi.  Anti-personnel bombs are dropped in the Latnia-Ta Ingrau area.  Four JU 88s drop high explosive bombs near Bir Miftuh Church.

Bir Miftuh Chapel

0950 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled and intercept five JU 88s with fighter escort as they turn away from bombing Ta Qali.  W/Cdr Thompson and P/O Reid each damage one ME 109.  Sgt Vinall fails to return.

1021 hrs  Raiders passed.

1105-1155 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS search for missing pilots.

1110-1225 hrs  One Spitfire from Hal Far searches for Sgt Vinall without success.  Sgt Vinall’s body is later discovered at the shoreline, on the west coast of the Island.

1130-1230 hrs  Eight JU 88s with an escort of 30 fighters are reported heading southwards from Sicily.  Malta’s Spitfires are scrambled early, intercepting the raiders a few miles south of the Sicilian coast and 35 miles from Malta.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack the JU 88s and fighters head-on.  W/Cdr Donaldson, F/O McElroy and F/Sgt Heskens each destroy one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson and S/Ldr Woods each destroy one ME 109.  One JU 88 is probably destroyed and four damaged; two ME 109s are damaged.  Three Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.  229 Squadron F/Lt Roscoe probably destroys one Macchi 202 and another is damaged; S/Ldr H C Baker damages one ME 109.

1205 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to follow up with an on the remaining JU 88s and fighters.  F/Lt Mcleod destroys one ME 109; Sgt McLennan and Sgt Rae each damage one.  In all, three Spitfires are damaged in combat and another is reported missing.

1315-1445 hrs  Three Hurricanes RNAS carry out a search for the missing pilot.  His dinghy is located and the High Speed Launch picks him up.

1430 hrs  45 enemy fighters are reported flying southwards from Sicily at a great height.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are airborne but see nothing.

1446-1510 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  W/Cdr Hanks destroys two ME 109s.

1535-1630 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1640 hrs  57 enemy aircraft including at least six JU 88s are reported heading southwards from Sicily.   Eight Spitfires 1535 Squadron and three 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage the raiders 30-40 miles north of Malta.  1435 Squadron S/Ldr Lovell destroys one JU 88; F/Sgt Scott destroys one Re 2001.  P/O Walten, F/Sgt Scott and Sgt Hawkins probably destroy one JU 88 each.  F/Sgt Scott also damages one Re 2001.  One Spitfire is shot down: pilot F/Sgt Stevenson is missing.

1652 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are airborne: no interceptions.

1715 hrs  Only a few enemy aircraft reach the Island at failing light.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron chase three unidentified enemy aircraft but are unable to engage.  The bombers appear to approach singly, dropping bombs on Sliema, Ghaxaq, Safi, Nigret, Latnia and Marsamxetto. Bombs are also scattered near Luqa and Kalafrana.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1820 hrs  Anti-personnel, incendiary and high explosive bombs are dropped near the Safi strip (between Tal Liebru and St Nicola Church), Ta Karach and Misrah Blandun.

1847 hrs  All clear.

1945-2011 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five enemy bombers approach Malta at 17-20000 feet; two cross the coast and drop bombs in the sea north of Grand Harbour and St Paul’s Bay.  Malta Beaufighter is airborne: no engagement.

2100 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a white flashing light out to sea 6-8 miles bearing 65 degrees Fort Ta Silch.  The vessel is later confirmed as the RAF Rescue Launch.

2120-2205 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy bombers approach at 27000 feet.  Three cross the coast and drop bombs at Benghaisa PT and in the sea north east of the Island.  Malta fighters are airborne: one attacks and destroys a HE 111 which jettisons its bombs during the engagement.

2120-2205 hrs  Four enemy bombers approach Malta.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept; F/O Shipard destroys one enemy bomber.

2220-2320 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron on patrol over Sicily attacks and shoots down an enemy bomber as it is about to land.

0245-0315 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach the Island at heights of up to 15000 feet but none cross the coast.  Flares are dropped off Madliena.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

0430-0500 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five enemy aircraft approach the Island: one crosses the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the Kalafrana area and in the sea east of Leonardo PT.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

Military casualties  Sergeant John Vinall, Pilot, Royal Air Force, 185 Squadron; Squadron Leader Bryan Wicks, Royal Air Force, 126 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties (known)  Unteroffizier Otto Kobszinowski, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner; Unteroffizier Max Zettelmaier, Crewman of a JU 88 bomber picked up from the sea and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 12 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy escorted Una to sea for patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Beaufighter to Edcu.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfire shot down into the sea: both pilots bailed out and rescued uninjured.  One Spitfire shot down by enemy fighters: pilot baled out and landed uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action: pilot uninjured.  Two Spitfires failed to return to base after enemy action: pilots missing.  One Beaufighter taxied into a bomb crater: crew uninjured.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  A detailed bomb search was carried out and discovered 23 unexploded anti-personnel bombs and two unexploded HE bombs.

13 October 1942: 1000 Axis Aircraft Destroyed Over Malta

Wreckage of JU 88

Today Malta claimed the 1000th enemy aircraft destroyed since Italy entered the war in June 1940.  The milestone was reached during the heaviest air raid on the Island since 10 May.  “We wonder can the Axis keep it up.”  (CO, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment).

Air raids are becoming more ‘systematic’ – with one before breakfast, one during the morning, then at lunchtime, mid-afternoon, just after tea and sometimes at dusk.  Attacking forces generally comprise six or seven JU 88 bombers with large fighter escorts raid the aerodromes in turn.  JU 88 bombers now appear to be adopting shallow dive tactics in an attempt to launch bombs on target.

MALTA WELLINGTONS ON THE ATTACK

A Baltimore on an afternoon shipping reconnaissance in the South Ionian Sea sighted two 6-7000 ton merchant vessels and six destroyers, proceeding south at 12 knots.  Three Wellingtons were despatched to attack but only one found the convoy, about half way between southern Greece and Benghazi.  Two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but fell wide of the target.

Two Beaufighters also carried out intruder sorties over Sicily today as Malta continues its role as a fortress against Axis operations in the Mediterranean.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 13 OCTOBER TO DAWN 14 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; slight shower with lightning early morning.

0610 hrs  As seven JU 88s escorted by 30 ME 109s approach the Island eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They engage three JU 88s with a large fighter escort.  F/Lt Charney probably destroys one ME 109; Major Swales and P/O Maynard each damage a ME 109; P/O Maynard and F/Sgt Maher each damage a JU 88.

0620 hrs  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and dive to attack five remaining JU 88s and fighter escort.  P/O Beurling destroys one JU 88 and one ME 109; P/O Seed probably destroys one JU 88.  P/O Seed, P/O Giddings, F/Lt Hetherington and Sgt Shenell each damage one ME 109.

0705-0729 hrs  Air raid alert.  The remaining raiders cross the coast: bombs are dropped in the Luqa area, killing two civilians.  Two JU 88s drop bombs in the area of Bir Miftuh Church.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Walten destroys one JU 88; P/O Pinney probably destroys one ME 109 and damages one JU 88.

0935-1035 hrs  Six JU 88s and 42 fighter approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and intercept the raiders about 10 miles north of Zonqor.  They launch a diving attack on one JU 88: no claims.

1007 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight of 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept. 1435 Squadron Sgt Hawkins destroys one JU 88; F/Sgt Scott destroys one ME 109 and damages one JU 88.  Sgt Sharp damages another JU 88 and Sgt Eva damages a ME 109.  126 Squadron WO Farquharson probably destroys one ME 109; W/Cdr Hanks damages one JU 88 and P/O Thompson damages a JU 88.  One Spitfire is damaged: the pilot is unhurt.

1030 hrs  JU 88s drop bombs on Safi and Hal Far, Kirkop and Ta Klantun, Ta Liebru and near Zurrieq.

1037 hrs  Raiders passed.

1123-1140 hrs  Air raid alert.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled on to intercept but see nothing.  The raiders do not approach Malta.

1235-1334 hrs  Six JU 88s with a heavy escort of 44 fighters are reported heading for Malta.  Eight Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and intercept the raiders 25 miles north of Zonqor: Major Swales probably destroys a JU 88; Sgt McLeod is reported missing.

1245 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and engage the remaining JU 88s with escorting fighters over Kalafrana Bay.  S/Ldr Baker and F/Sgt Bye each damage one ME 109; Sgt Miller damages one JU 88.

1310 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled and engage raiders.  F/Lt Jones destroys one ME 109; F/O smith destroys one Macchi 202.  F/Sgt Carey probably destroys one JU 88 and W/O Farquharson one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1315 hrs  Two JU 88s drop bombs on Zurrieq village.

1330 hrs  High explosive and incendiary bombs are dropped near Luqa, on Wied Babu and Nigret.  Private Fenech of 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment is affected by blast; Private Teuma is injured by a bomb splinter in the elbow.

1335 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report one ME 109 shot down into the sea one mile off Grand Harbour.

1344 hrs  Raiders passed.

1550 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron and eight of 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 30 enemy fighters and bombers approaching Malta.

1611 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.   Sgt [White]destroys one JU 88 and F/Lt McLeod destroys one Macchi 202.

1630 hrs  Seven JU 88s cross the coast at Kalafrana heading for Qrendi where they drop into a steep dive to bomb Qrendi air strip.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs land on Qrendi village, near Tal Providenza and on Qrendi strip.  One just misses a defence post, wounding one member of 4th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment.  One high explosive bomb lands near Hagiar Qim battery of 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

The Spitfires of 229 and 249 Squadrons then launch an attack on the fighters and bombers and a general dogfight ensues.  229 Squadron P/O Nash destroys one JU 88; W/Cdr Donaldson damages another.  His and one other Spitfire are damaged in combat and crash land at Ta Qali: neither pilot is hurt.  Total enemy casualties are two JU 88s, two ME 109s, three Macchi 202s and one Re 2001 destroyed; three JU 88s damaged.

1652 hrs  Raiders passed.

1810-1905 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to locate and intercept enemy raiders but are unable to get within range: visibility is poor due to failing light.  The raid does not materialize.

2212-0013 hrs  Air raid alert.  Ten enemy aircraft approach the Island but only four cross the coast.  Bombs are dropped on the edge of Hal Far runway; the aerodrome remains serviceable.  Incendiaries are dropped on Zebbug and Mellieha, and on Wardia Ridge.  Observers identify one enemy aircraft in the searchlights as a Focke-Wolfe Zenstorer.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no engagement.

0218-0258 hrs  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept enemy raiders: no engagement.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Alexander MacLeod, Royal Canadian Air Force, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Emanual Mifsud, age 20.  Sliema  John Block, age 20.

Enemy casualties (known)  Sottotenente Maurizio Iannucci, 352a Squadriglia, 20o Gruppo, 51o Stormo, pilot of a Macchi 202 fighter, shot down and killed; Captain Enzo Radini, pilot of Macchi 202 fighter aircraft, picked up from the sea by RAF Launch.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 13 OCTOBER 1942

P34 HMS Ultimatum

ROYAL NAVY  P 34 was swept in by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire crashed into the sea during combat with enemy fighters: pilot missing.  One Spitfire force-landed: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire damaged by enemy action: pilot uninjured.  One Beaufighter’s hydraulic system failed on landing: crew uninjured.

ROYAL ARTILLERY  Gunner Davies 6/4 Regt was wounded in action at XHB 10 Heavy Ack Ack position.

 14 October 1942: Screwball Beurling’s Last Mission

82 enemy aircraft have been destroyed over Malta between 10 and 14 October 1942.  “Still they come asking for more, and they get it.”  CO, 7th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment

MALTA SPITFIRE ACES SHOT DOWN

George Beurling

Record-breaking fighter pilot George Beurling was lucky to escape alive today when his Spitfire was strafed by enemy cannon shells, causing him serious injuries.  Pilot Officer Beurling, also known as ‘Screwball’ was flying one of seven Spitfires of 249 Squadron scrambled at 1300 hours today to attack nine JU 88 bombers with and a large close escort of German and Italian fighters just south of Zonqor Point.

Having downed one JU 88, Beurling spotted a fellow Spitfire under fire from a band of Messerschmitts and attacked, downing the leading fighter.  Another JU 88 bomber returned fire, wounding Beurling in the arm and hand.  He broke off and climbed, before turning to pursue another ME 109 on the tail of a Spitfire.  Beurling’s fire shot off the wing of the Messerschmitt and it spiralled downwards as he watched.  The moment’s distraction was nearly fatal: cannon shells from another ME 109 ripped into his Spitfire from below, badly injuring his heel, elbow and ribs and setting the aircraft on fire.

Beurling managed to bail out and parachuted down towards the sea.  The ME 109 fired again at the pilot and his ‘chute but was chased away by another Spitfire.  Beurling was rescued later from the sea by the High Speed Launch and taken to hospital.  His injuries bring to an end his run of 29 enemy aircraft destroyed over Malta between July and October 1942.

Wing Commander Arthur Donaldson DSO was also injured earlier today in combat with enemy raiders.  W/Cdr Donaldson was piloting one of four Spitfires in an air battle with eight JU 88s and their fighter escort.  He flew straight through the fighter cordon to launch a head-on attack on the enemy bombers.  The raiders returned fire, injuring Donaldson in the head and foot.   Two of his fingers were shot away and he had to withdraw.  For the second time in two days, and despite serious injuries, he managed to land his damaged Spitfire safely at Ta Qali before being taken to hospital.

Adrian Warburton

AIRCRAFT LOST IN CONVOY RAID – RECONNAISSANCE PILOT WARBURTON HELPS ENEMY DESTROYER RESCUE SURVIVORS

A reconnaissance Spitfire from Malta today spotted a convoy including a 2000 ton merchant vessel escorted by a destroyer, off the Tripolitanian coast and heading east.  Three Beaufighters of 227 Squadron Luqa were despatched immediately to attack.

At 1130 hrs today they located the convoy and all three Beaufighters went in to attack at mast height.  One was shot down before it reached target.  The other hit the ship’s mast causing the plane to crash into the sea and killing the pilot, Flying Officer Peter Underwood and navigator Flight Sergeant Ivor Miller. The third Beaufighter dropped two 300 lb bombs and fired with cannon and machine gun but no results were seen.

Reconnaissance pilot Squadron Leader Adrian Warburton was still on the scene and spotted the dinghy of the aircraft of P/O Brice and Sgt Cole.  Despite being fired on by Italian fighters, he persevered in making contact with the enemy destroyer, to guide the ship to the location of the Beaufighter’s dinghy.  S/Ldr Warburton reported seeing the survivors picked up by the destroyer before he returned to base.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 14 OCTOBER TO DAWN 15 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fair early morning; otherwise fine.  Very good visibility morning and afternoon.

0535-0640 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

0645 hrs  Eight JU 88s with fighter escort are reported approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  W/Cdr Thompson, P/O Reid and P/O O’Brien each damage a ME 109.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are also scrambled and attack 20 German and Italian fighters head-on, north of St Paul’s Bay.  .  W/Cdr Donaldson damages one JU 88 before his Spitfire is forced to crash-land at Ta Qali; he is injured and admitted to hospital.

0707 hrs  Nine Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and attack just north of Grand Harbour.  F/Lt Rolls destroys one JU 88; Sgt Park and F/O Wallace each destroy one ME 109.  Sgt Park also probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Hending and F/Sgt Bush each damage one.  One Spitfire is lost and two damaged: pilots are unhurt.

0727 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight JU 88s with an escort of forty fighters approach the Island, the majority crossing the coast.  Bombs are dropped on Ta Qali rendering the aerodrome temporarily unserviceable.  There are two civilian casualties.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack six JU 88s as bombs are dropping on Ta Qali.  S/Ldr Woods and F/Sgt De Lara each damage one JU 88.

0741 hrs  Raiders passed.

0940 hrs  60 enemy aircraft including at least eight JU 88 bombers approach the Island in tight formation, with 20 ME 109s flying above as top cover.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and intercept the raiders 20 miles north of Grand Harbour, attacking six JU 88s from astern and head-on.  Sgt Brough destroys one JU 88; Sgt Francis probably destroys one ME 109.  Sgt Lundy damages two JU 88s; F/Lt Glazebrook and P/O Nash each damage one.  One Spitfire is missing: P/O Nash is slightly injured in the face and is picked up by the Rescue Launch.

1026-1056 hrs  Air raid alert.  The remainder head for Hal Far.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and attack the raiders while they are diving to bomb the airfield.  W/Cdr Thompson destroys a JU 88; P/O Reid and Capt Kuhlmann each destroy a ME 109.  P/O Cheek probably destroys a JU 88 and damages another.  P/O Reid damages a JU 88; Sgt Tarbuck damages a JU 88 and a ME 109, and Capt Kuhlmann damages a ME 109.    Bombs are dropped on Hal Far and Safi, Wied Has Saptan, Ta Klantun and Ta Liebru, and anti-personnel bombs on Kirkop.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  As the enemy turn away they are attacked again, north west of Kalafrana.

Total enemy casualties three JU 88s and two ME 109s destroyed; one JU 88 and one ME 109 probably destroyed; six JU 88s and three ME 109s damaged.

1300 hrs  Nine JU 88s approach the Island, closely escorted by fighters.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Beurling destroys two ME 109s and one JU 88.  P/O Giddings destroys one ME 109.  F/Lt Hetherington probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Wynn probably destroys one ME 109.  P/O Giddings and Sgt Bryden each damage a JU 88 and P/O Williams damages two ME 109s.

1305 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  P/O Parkinson destroys one Macchi 202; S/Ldr Stephens destroys one Re 2001 and damages on JU 88.  Two Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots are unhurt.

1310 hrs  Air raid alert.

1330 hrs  Seven JU 88s raid Hal Far, dropping high explosives and incendiaries on the aerodrome, causing craters.  Anti-personnel bombs are scattered over Regimental HQ and 14th Battery HQ of 4th Heavy Ack Ack Regiment.  Enemy raiders make skillful use of cloud cover during the raid.

1355 hrs  Raiders passed.

1510-1535 hrs  Air raid alert.  35 aircraft including 7 JU 88s approach the Island and are intercepted 15 miles north east of Zonqor.  Four ME 109s and one Re 2001 are destroyed; one JU 88 is probably destroyed; three JU 88s and two ME 109s damaged.

The remainder of the attackers head for Hal Far and are engaged over Kalafrana by eight Spitfires from Hal Far.  F/Sgt Maher destroys a JU 88 and Sgt Guy probably destroys a ME 109 and damages a JU 88.  Bombs are dropped on Hal Far aerodrome causing craters but no major damage.  Heavy Ack Ack fires.

1636 hrs  Air raid alert for ten JU 88s escorted by 40 fighters evidently turning in to head for Ta Qali.  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled and intercept the raiders to the east of Grand Harbour before they can cross the coast.  They attack the bombers head-on, forcing them to turn out to sea and away from their target.  Most of their bombers jettison their load into the sea.  Sgt Miller destroys one JU 88 and damages one; S/Ldr M M Stephens and P/O Johnson each damage one JU 88.  A few bombs are dropped in the Mosta area.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and share in the destruction of one JU 88.

1710 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report three bombers and a fighter (believed to be a Spitfire) in the sea off Grand Harbour.

1715 hrs  Raiders passed.

2100-2110 hrs  Air raid alert.  10 enemy bombers approach Malta: all but one turn back before crossing the coast, dropping their bombs in the sea all round the north coast of the Island.  Some high explosives and incendiaries are dropped between Bugibba and Salina, and across to Mosta.  Heavy Ack Ack fire and Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

2145 hrs  Five enemy fighter bombers launch a dive-bombing attack on the RAF station at Qawra Tower and Headquarters of C Company, 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

2200 hrs  A Company, 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report bombs in the Latnia area.  E Company report bombs in the area of St Mary’s Battery.

0205-0435 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight enemy bombers approach the Island but only two cross the coast, dropping bombs on Ta Qali, Ghain Tuffieha and Hamrun.  Malta Beauffighters are airborne and one sees a HE 111 approaching at 12000 feet.  The fighter dives from 15000 feet to attack, lowering his undercarriage to avoid overshooting.  He fires at the enemy raider from astern, causing it to explode and crash into the sea.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Ivor Miller, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 227 Squadron; Sergeant Ronald Roe, Royal New Zealand Air Force, 1435 Squadron; Squadron Leader Peter Underwood, RAF VR, 227 Squadron; Flight Sergeant William Williams, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Francis Fenech, age 18.  Msida  Anthony Zahra, age 11.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 14 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept P 211 in from sea; the latter reported having driven a 900 ton steamer ashore by gunfire and subsequently destroyed it by torpedo. She also reported two other merchant vessels successfully attacked with torpedoes.  Fleet Air Arm obtained one hit on a 7000 merchant vessel which was subsequently beached at Homs.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Liberator from LG 224; one Beaufighter from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Beauforts to Shallufa.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires shot down by enemy fighters: pilots missing.  One Beaufighter damaged by enemy action crash-landed: crew uninjured.

Four Spitfires damaged in enemy action: one pilot injured.  Three Spitfires shot down by enemy action into sea: pilots rescued, two uninjured, one slightly injured. Two Beaufighters damaged by enemy action while on shipping strike, crashed into the sea: crews missing.

HAL FAR  1925-0032 hrs  Two Albacores and one Swordfish of the RNAS were despatched to attack 7000 ton merchant vessel escorted by two destroyers off the coast of Tripoli.  One torpedo hit the merchantman amidships, which was later observed to be stationary.

LUQA  One Wellington 69 Squadron attacked an enemy convoy south east of Malta.  Two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but no results were observed.  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron were sent out later to complete the attack.  All the aircraft found the convoy: one torpedo and two 1000 lb bombs were dropped but no results were observed.

TA QALI  The runway is unserviceable for ten minutes for inspection after an air raid: no significant damage.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 8-14 October the Battalion has found two impressed lorries, one motor cycle and five Other Ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  Twin Lewis guns have been manned for Anti-aircraft defence of the Safi Strip during the hours of daylight.

15 October 1942: Luftwaffe Fighter Bombers Target Malta

  • Enemy send ten fighters to protect one bomber.
  • Enemy raiders are now dropping flares only – the reason is unclear, as following raiders rarely take advantage of the light to drop bombs on the illuminated area.
  • Since the beginning of intensified air attack Army has increased the number of soldiers assisting RAF in maintenance of aircraft and aerodromes to 500 daily.

MP SUGGESTS ISLAND SHOULD BE KNOWN AS ‘MALTA GC’

Walter Higgs MP

Mr Walter Higgs, MP for Birmingham West, today asked the Prime Minister in the House of Commons whether he is aware that an official proclamation to the effect that henceforth Malta should be known and addressed as Malta GC would meet with general approval; and will he make the necessary announcement?

MALTA AIR FORCES SCORE STRIKE ON AXIS MERCHANTMAN

Two Albacores in co-operation with a Swordfish were sent out tonight to attack a 7000 ton merchant vessel and two destroyers which had left Patras on a south westerly course.  They found it at 2153 hours, 80 miles north east of Homs and one Albacore scored a direct hit amidships.  The other Albacore which was not able to get into a suitable position to attack while the flares dropped by the Swordfish were still alight brought its torpedo back. 

Wellington bomber

The merchant vessel was left almost stationary and was found 1½ hours later by a Wellington which dropped to 1000 lb bombs but they fell wide.  Later in the night the convoy was attacked again by Wellingtons with one torpedo and two 1000 lb bombs but no results were observed owing to a partially effective smoke screen put up by one of the destroyers.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 15 OCTOBER TO DAWN 16 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine; lightning early morning and late evening.

0650 hrs  A massive formation of some 60 enemy fighters escorting six JU 88s approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and are attacked by ME 109s: Sgt Wynn destroys one.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and eight 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

0705 hrs  Air raid alert.  Dogfights ensue as Malta fighters engage the enemy over Kalafrana, off Zonqor Point and over the Island.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled and attack the formation.  Despite being outnumbered over fifteen to one, S/Ldr Stephens attacks enemy bombers head on, following one bomber down to sea-level and chasing it 20 miles out to sea before finally shooting it down in flames.  He is then attacked by six enemy fighters but returns fire, destroying one of the ME 109s.  His aircraft is badly shot up and he returns to base, surviving a crash-landing. 

The eight Spitfires 249 Squadron also press on to attack the bombers.  P/O Moody destroys one JU 88.  P/O Williams probably destroys one JU 88; P/O Giddings damages one.

0722 hrs  The remaining four JU 88s come in and drop bombs near Luqa aerodrome and in the Kirkop area.

0740 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a Spitfire down in the sea off Leonardo with a baler-out nearby.  An anti-personnel bomb explodes 25 yards from a post of B Company.

0755 hrs  Raiders passed.

0935 hrs  About 40 enemy fighters, including 15 carrying bombs are reported approaching Malta.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy north of the Island.  Many raiders drop their bombs out to sea, as well as on Marfa and Mellieha Bay, where one civilian is killed and two injured.  A few bombs fall on Gozo.  249 Squadron are jumped by ME 109s flying in pairs and threes.  Sgt Wynn damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires crash-land and a third ditches into the sea: Sgt Bryden is rescued with a fractured leg.

0940 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

1005 hrs  Air raid alert as the raiders approach the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and four 126 Squadron are airborne to intercept the raid: no claims.

1047 hrs  Raiders passed.

1151-1337 hrs  Air raid alert.  About 50 German and Italian fighters approach Malta but turn back before reaching the coast.  They appear to be searching for missing crews, and escorting ambulance aircraft.  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They see a float plane with fighter escort 35 miles north of the Island.  F/Lt Charney and F/Sgt Maher each destroy a Macchi 202; Major Swales and Sgt Garvey damage one each.

1235-1355 hrs  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to act as cover for 185 Squadron.  Enemy aircraft are sighted but cannot be brought into contact.

1358-1430 hrs  Air raid alert.  30 enemy fighters including at least seven ME 109 fighter bombers approach the Island.  Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron on patrol attack, forcing most of the raiders to to drop their bombs in the sea.  Bombs are also dropped on the Ta Qali and Mosta areas.

1610 hrs  Nine JU 88s approach the Island with an escort of 50 fighters.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy.  F/Lt Glazebrook damages one JU 88; Sgt Francis damages one Macchi 202.

1616 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron attack the enemy formation head-on over Kalafrana Bay, causing them to jettison their bombs.  S/Ldr Woods destroys one ME 109 and damages a JU 88; P/O Yates and Sgt Stead probably destroy one ME 109; several other enemy aircraft are damaged.  1st Bn Cheshire Regt report seeing two enemy bombers crashing into the sea just off Grand Harbour.  The port engine of one had been shot off.  Three Spitfires are damaged (pilots unhurt); one Spitfire is lost and F/Sgt Hiskens is reported missing.

1640 hrs  Seven JU 88s drop bombs on the Safi strip and other bombs and incendiaries on Tal Liebru, Luqa, Kirkop and Marsa.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1704 hrs  Raiders passed.

1912-1920 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy aircraft approaches but turns back twenty miles east of the Island.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

1922-1928 hrs  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne on intercept patrol but see no enemy aircraft.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron is scrambled to intercept two enemy aircraft approaching the island, one of which crosses the coast: no engagement.

1940-2034 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft approach the Island; one crosses the coast.  Bombs are dropped in the sea off Grand Harbour and St Paul’s Bay.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

2028 hrs  Bombs are dropped near a defence post of C Company, 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.

2124-2158 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach; three cross the Island.  Bombs are dropped in the sea east of Grand Harbour and on land at Zonqor Point.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

0220-0443 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine bombers approach the Island, four crossing the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs are dropped in the St Paul’s Bay and Wardia areas and in the sea.  Flares are dropped over Benghaisa Point.  Three Beaufighters 89 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: one sees an enemy raider crash north of Cape Passero.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer Edwin Hiskens, Royal Australian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Gzira  Joseph Scicluna, age 48.  Mellieha  Arthur Calleja, age 6.  Sliema  Joseph Letard, age 65.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 15 OCTOBER 1942

P 212 HMS Sahib

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P 212 to sea and P 46 in. The latter reported as having sunk on loaded merchant vessel and one in ballast.

AIR HQ  Departures  One Liberator, two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires damaged in enemy action: pilots uninjured.  Three Spitfires shot down by enemy fighters: both pilots baled out and were rescued, injured.  Two Spitfires damaged by enemy action crashed on landing: pilots uninjured.  One Spitfire forced to land during enemy action: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire missing over sea following enemy action: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  2300-0215 hrs  One Swordfish is sent on anti E boat patrol: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Two Baltimores 69 Squadron were despatched in search of an enemy convoy.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photographic reconnaissance of Benghasi.

16 October 1942: Hurricane Hit in Friendly Fire Incident

A Hurricane aircraft was attacked this morning by a Spitfire six miles off Grand Harbour.  The friendly fire incident happened during the confusion of an expected air raid which had not materialised.  The alert was raised just before 8.30 am when eight Axis aircraft were reported patrolling the Kalafrana area.  However, four separate groups of Spitfires scrambled to intercept the raiders failed to locate any enemy planes.

Forty minutes after the scramble, a Hurricane was despatched to search for a missing pilot was recalled with the expectation of imminent action.  Once the ‘raiders passed’ signal was given, a Hurricane was again sent on a rescue mission.  However, the Spitfires were still in the air on the look-out for hostile aircraft: one caught a glimpse of the Hurricane and fired before realising it was friendly.  The Hurricane sustained damage but landed safely: the pilot escaped injury.

137 UNEXPLODED BOMBS IN 7 DAYS

A massive increase in the number of unexploded bombs has resulted from recent enemy air activity.  The intercept tactics now used by RAF Squadrons are costing the enemy dearly – but raiders under attack jettison more bombs.  137 UXB reports have been received by Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal in the week since the Axis renewed heavy air raids on Malta.  All the reports are concentrated around the three airfields of Hal Far, Luqa and Ta Qali, and on the north east coast of the Island.

Anti-personnel bomb canister

A third of the reports were for high explosives, the rest were anti-personnel bombs or incendiaries.  The Luftwaffe is using mainly 50kg bombs again: more of them can be loaded onto each aircraft and, with fewer planes reaching target, a single bomber getting through can drop a greater number of bombs in one attempt.

Adapted from UXB Malta, S A M Hudson, History Press 2010/2012

AIR RAIDS DAWN 16 OCTOBER TO DAWN 17 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine; little or no cloud.

0625-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0649 hrs  50 enemy aircraft including eight JU 88s approach the Island.

0701 hrs  Air raid alert.   Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  The raiders are attacked 5-10 miles north of Grand Harbour.  Capt Kuhlmann and P/O Reid each probably destroy a MU 88; P/O O’Brien damages another and Sgt Gore damages a ME 109.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and seven 126 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled and engage the raiders.  126 Squadron Sgt Park destroys one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are lost: F/O Wallace and Sgt Wilson are missing.  1435 Squadron P/O Owen probably destroys one ME 109 and damages another; Sgt Harrison damages one JU 88 and F/Lt McLeod one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged.  The enemy bombers are forced to jettison their bombs over the sea.  Some bombs fall on land at Sliema and St Julian’s, damaging civilian property and injuring thirteen.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

0725 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a fighter crashed in the sea four miles out from Della Grazia.

0742 hrs  Raiders passed.

0800 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a Spitfire crashed into the sea two miles due north of Grand Harbour.

0829-0946 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight enemy aircraft approach the Island and patrol the Kalafrana area.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept: no sightings.

0900 hrs  Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no combat.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron are also airborne on interception: no sightings.

0905 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled but encounter no enemy aircraft.

0910 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is dispatched to search for a missing pilot but is recalled before beginning the search.

0946 hrs  One Hurricane searches 042 degrees Grand Harbour 6 miles but is attacked by a Spitfire: the aircraft is damaged but the pilot is unhurt.

0950 hrs  More than 60 enemy aircraft approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and engage enemy aircraft.  Sgt Francis destroys one ME 109; Sgt Ballantyne and P/O Reynolds each damage one JU 88.

0952 hrs  Air raid alert.  Fighters carry out a sweep of the Island.  Six Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  F/Lt McLeod destroys one ME 109.

1010 hrs  Seven JU 88s cross the coast near Hal Far and drop bombs on the airfield, slightly damaging an aircraft on the ground.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron make a head-on attack on bombers as they bomb the airfield.  F/Sgt Lara destroys one JU 88; S/Ldr Woods and F/O McElroy each damage one.  P/O Lowrey damages one ME 109.  Two Spitfires are lost: one pilot is safe but injured; F/Sgt Carter is shot down into the sea and is missing.  Four Spitfires are damaged in combat: pilots unhurt.

1045-1235 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far searches for the missing pilot: no sightings.  Four Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept enemy aircraft: no sightings.

1050 hrs  Raiders passed.

1250 hrs  35 enemy fighters, including ME 109 fighter bombers, approach the Island.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  They see four ME 109s but the raiders are too far away and flying too fast to be intercepted.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 35 enemy fighters including fighter bombers: no engagement.

1300-1340 hrs  Air raid alert.  The raiders cross the coast at over 25000 feet.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Bombs are dropped near Mqabba and in the Mellieha area before escaping towards Sicily.

1505-1612 hrs  Two Hurricanes from Hal Far are dispatched to search for a missing pilot: nothing sighted.

1535 hrs  A massive formation of eight JU 88s with an escort of 60 fighters including six fighter bombers approaches the Island in six waves.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled and attack the seven JU 88s and six ME 109 fighter bombers.  P/O Williams destroys one JU 88 and Sgt Wynn probably destroys one.  F/Lt Hetherington and Sgt Budd each damage a JU 88.

1540 hrs  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Miller probably destroys one JU 88 and damages another; F/Lt Parkinson also damages one.

1615 hrs  Air raid alert.  Seven Spitfires 1435 Squadron and ten 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  126 Squadron Sgt Cherran destroys one JU 88; Sgt Marshall probably destroys one ME 109; Sgt Tiddy and Sgt Roberts each damage one JU 88.  Sgt Tiddy damages one ME 109 and F/Lt Jones damages one Macchi 202.  1435 Squadron P/O Walton, Sgt Fuller and Sgt Eva each damage one JU 88. Three Spitfires are damaged in combat: pilots unhurt.

1630 hrs  The bombers, fighters and fighter bombers cross the coast in six waves.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Four JU 88s attack Luqa, destroying one Beaufighter on the ground and damaging another, before receding south.  4th Bn Heavy Ack Ack Regiment guns at XHB 8 claim a direct hit on one JU 88 which is then seen to crash into the sea: claim one JU 88 destroyed.  The ME 109s bomb Ta Qali, rendering the aerodrome temporarily unserviceable and injuring two civilians.

1655 hrs  Raiders passed.

1700 hrs  2nd Bn Royal Irish Fusiliers Beat the Retreat in Castille Square.

1831-1844 hrs  Air raid alert.  One aircraft crosses the coast but no bombs are dropped.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

2332-2350 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft approach the Island and cross the coast, dropping flares north west of Ta Qali.  Bombs and incendiaries are dropped on the St Paul’s Bay and Rabat areas.  Beaufighters of 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept: no raiders seen.

0246-0335 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six enemy aircraft approach the Island; only one crosses the coast.  All bombs are dropped in the sea.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

Military casualties  Warrant Officer II Peter Carter, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron; Flying Officer Edward Wallace, Royal Canadian Air Force, 126 Squadron; Flight Sergeant William Wilson, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 1435 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties (known)  Wallenburger and Wehner: crew members of a JU 88 bomber picked up from the sea by RAF Launch.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER 1942

HMS Hythe

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept in P 43 who reported having sunk an 8000 ton southbound merchant vessel.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC 3 from LG 224. Aircraft casualties  Four Spitfires damaged due to enemy action: one pilot baled out, rescued uninjured; two pilots crash-landed, one injured.  Two Spitfires missing from enemy action: pilots missing.

LUQA  One Baltimore 69 Squadron was despatched on reconnaissance with one Spitfire 69 Squadron on photo-reconnaissance.  2330-0300 hrs  One Wellington 69 Squadron was despatched to locate and illuminate one merchant vessel sighted by the Baltimore.  Flares were dropped.

17 October 1942: Spitfires Must Win 2nd Battle of Malta

AIR OFFICER COMMANDING RALLIES RAF

The following message has been sent by AOC Mediterranean addressed to Spitfire pilots: “Grand work fighter boys.  Your magnificent fighting in the last five days is being watched not only in Malta but by the RAF on other fronts as well as by our Russian allies.  Although heavily outnumbered last May Malta Spitfires came out on top and I am confident that you will win the second battle of Malta.  Some of the enemy bomber squadrons have already shown that they cannot take it.  Keep it up and in a few days the other German bombers will throw up the sponge.  Replacement Spitfires and pilots are on the way but there is still some stiff fighting to finish the job.  Good luck to you and good shooting.”

Army operated fuel bowser

A second message is addressed to all maintenance personnel:  “Your part in the present battle for Malta is greatly appreciated but serviceability of Spitfires continues to fall.  You can and must get it up again.  Where you have worked hard you must work harder and faster.  Give the fighter boys Spitfires and they will drive the Hun out of the sky.”

RAF CLAIM SCALPS OF TWO LUFTWAFFE AIR ACES

Two highly decorated Luftwaffe ‘gruppenkommandeure’ (group commanders) were killed in air battles over Malta today.

GKmdr Major Heinrich Paekpcke was pilot of the leading JU 88 of seven bombers attacking early this morning when his aircraft was involved in a head-on collision with a Spitfire just off the coast to the south east of Valletta.  Both pilots were killed instantly, although the three other Luftwaffe crewmen seen to bail out before the bomber hit the water.  Spitfire pilot Flight Lieutenant Jones was a member of 126 Squadron sent to intercept the enemy raiders.

Gerhard Kollewe

Bomber pilot GKmdr Gerhard Kollewe was flying one of seven JU 88s and nine ME 109 fighter bombers which launched a heavy bombing raid over Malta just after noon today.  His bomber was shot down into the sea during an air battle with Malta Spitfires intercepting the raid off the coast of Valletta. Kollewe and his crew baled out but he and observer Feldwebel Bernhard Mähler were killed. Radio operator Oberfeldwebel Martin Assum and aerial gunner Feldwebel Paul Ballof were rescued alive and taken prisoner of war.

Heinrich Paepcke and Gerhard Kollewe were highly decorated Luftwaffe commanders, among the elite recipients of the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross, awarded for extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 17 OCTOBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt:  The War Office

1.  Enemy air offensive during daylight resumed with great suddenness on 11 October.  Tactics: 6-8 JU 88s escorted by 30-50 fighters making an average of four raids daily on aerodromes.  These tactics are the same as the beginning of 1942 but with much increased fighter support.  The latter proved most necessary but did not prevent heavy losses German Air Force.  Spitfires made magnificent interceptions, many 15-20 miles north of Gozo and destroyed 49 JU 88s and 59 fighters, probably destroyed 27 JU 88s and 21 fighters and damaged 67 JU 88s and 64 fighters.  Heavy Ack Ack destroyed one JU 88 and damaged another.  As the week progressed, the determination to force home attacks grew weaker and bombs fell further and further from the aerodromes, eg Wardia Ridge, Mellieha and in the sea.  German Air Force towards the end of the week were forced to use fighter bombers.  Malta casualties only 24 Spitfires lost (11 pilots safe) but many damaged.  Little damage to aircraft on the ground or aerodromes.  Photo reconnaissance shows that numbers of aircraft in Sicily continue to increase – now total 660 including 196 German bombers and 238 fighters.

2.  During darkness approximately 100 bombers, of which only 34 crossed the coast.  These attacks were not characterised by the same determination as daylight attacks early in the week.  Bombs in scattered localities; little damage.  Beaufighters destroyed four HE 111s, probably destroyed another.  Heavy Ack Ack destroyed one bomber.  Approximately 33 per cent illuminations by searchlights.

3.  Own air attacks on convoys by a small number of Beaufighters, Albacores and Wellingtons resulted in one merchant vessel 7000 tons hit.

4.  Working parties were increased to assist RAF in maintaining aerodromes and aircraft.  Many UXBs dealt with.

5.  Military damage negligible.  Some damage civilian property and civilian casualties.  Military casualties one Other Rank killed, nine wounded.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 17 OCTOBER TO DAWN 18 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine.

0635 hrs  Seven JU 88s with an escort of some 25 fighters approach the Island.  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to locate the enemy fighters but do not engage.

0645 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  F/Lt Charney damages one Macchi 202.  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron and four 1435 Squadron Luqa are also scrambled to intercept and engage the enemy 12 miles east of Zonqor, forcing them to jettison their bombs in the sea.  126 Squadron P/O Thompson, W/Cdr Hanks and P/O Stevenson each destroy one JU 88; F/Sgt Varey destroys one ME 109.  Sgt Yeatman and F/Sgt Varey probably destroy one JU 88 each.  1435 Squadron S/Ldr Lovell damages one JU 88.  One Spitfire is damaged (pilot unhurt).  F/Lt Jones crashes into a JU 88, bringing it down: heis missing.

0648 hrs  Air raid alert.  A few remaining aircraft cross the coast and drop bombs on scattered areas from Naxxar to Madliena.  The ME 109s drop their bombs on Ta Qali.  Four ME 109 fighter bombers launch a further attack on Qawra Tower area.

0725-0900 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is airborne on a search for missing airmen: nothing sighted.

0735 hrs  Raiders passed.

0800-0900 hrs  Seven Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0915-1100 hrs  One Hurricane from Hal Far is airborne on a search for missing airmen: nothing sighted.

0938-1007 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight ME 109s approach to within three miles of Grand Harbour, suspected to be searching for survivors.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1133 hrs  75 enemy aircraft including seven JU 88s and nine ME 109 fighter bombers are reported approaching the Island. Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept and attack five JU 88s with escort plus six ME 109 fighter bombers.  F/Lt Hetherington destroys one JU 88; P/O Giddings destroys one ME 109.  P/O Seed probably destroys one JU 88; Sgt Budd probably destroys one ME 109 and P/O Moody damages one.

1152 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Smith and F/Lt Charney each damage one JU 88; P/O Park damages two others and one ME 109.  Sgt Garvey is shot up and crash lands: his aircraft catches fire and he is injured.

1158 hrs  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron attack five JU 88s with fighter escort and six ME 109 fighter bombers head on.  F/Lt Parkinson destroys one ME 109.  One Spitfire does not return: pilot Sgt Miller is missing.

1210 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  Sgt Tiddy destroys one JU 88 which is seen to crash into the sea at 1232 hrs.  One Spitfire is damaged: the pilot is unhurt.  The remaining raiders cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  The JU 88s drop bombs on Birkirkara, Sliema, Naxxar and Gharghur, demolishing several houses and damaging others.  Bombs fall opposite the Officers’ Mess of 2nd Bn Royal West Kent Regiment in Birkirkara.

1244 hrs  Ta Qali aerodrome is attacked by six ME 109 fighter bombers: no significant damage is caused.

1314 hrs  Raiders passed.

1502-1513 hrs  Air raid alert.  Enemy fighters approach to within 3 miles north of Comiso on a search for survivors.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1630 hrs  60 enemy aircraft including ten ME 109 fighter bombers approach from several directions at a great height. Seven Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.

1637 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept: one is damaged in combat and another crash-lands with undercarriage trouble.

1652 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and eight 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept.  The remaining raiders cross the coast and bombs are dropped in the sea and on land in St Paul’s Bay area.

1701 hrs  Four enemy fighters launch a dive-bombing attack on the RAF station at Qawra Tower and Headquarters of C Company 2nd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment.  The raiders are engaged by anti-aircraft fire from Qawra Tower.

1735 hrs  Raiders passed.  Enemy casualties: nil.  Three Spitfires are damaged in combat; pilots unhurt.

1800 hrs  15 enemy bombers approach the Island at dusk.   Three Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept but do not locate the raiders.

1810 hrs  Air raid alert.  Most of the bombers cross the coast and dive-bomb Kalafrana, damaging a hangar, and on Birzebbugga.  High explosive, anti-personnel and incendiary bombs are dropped on Hal Far airfield and Safi in another dive-bombing attack, causing craters near the runway and damaging one Spitfire.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  One HE 111 is destroyed.

1846 hrs  Raiders passed.

0024-0058 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach Malta.  One crosses the coast dropping flares over St Paul’s Bay and a delayed action bomb on Ta Qali.  Other bombs are dropped in the sea.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne to intercept enemy raiders but see no aircraft.

0315-0352 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy bombers approach the Island but only one crosses the coast, dropping flares.  The other three drop their bombs in the sea north of the Island.  Beaufighters 89 Squadron are airborne: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Ripley Jones, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 126 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Ronald Miller, RAF VR, 229 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Anthony Camilleri, age 40; Carmela Gatt, age 45; George Zammit, age 8.

Enemy casualties (known)  Oberfeldwebel Walter Boerner and Feldwebel Edwald Futterknecht, air gunner and crewman of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner; Gruppenkommandeure (GKmdr) Gerhard Kollewe pilot of JU 88 bomber shot down into the sea and killed; GKmdr Major Heinrich Paekpcke, pilot of a JU 88 bomber collided with a Spitfire and killed; Unteroffizier Erwin Seibt, Wireless Operator of a JU 88 bomber, picked up from the sea and taken prisoner.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 17 OCTOBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires missing due to enemy action: pilots missing.  Four Spitfires damaged by enemy action: one pilot uninjured; three crashed – one pilot injured.

HAL FAR  2032-0122 hrs  One Swordfish and one Albacore were despatched to attack a 7000 ton merchant vessel previously attacked on 14 October and discovered beached near Homs Harbour.  The Swordfish returned early with engine trouble, jettisoning the torpedo.  The Albacore located the target but cloud cover over the moon prevented him making an accurate attack.  He dropped a torpedo but observed no results.

LUQA  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron on patrol over Catania sees a HE 111 on the runway and destroys it.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photo-reconnaissance of Benghasi and another made a photo-recce of Homs.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  The Battalion is now finding one Officer and 50 Other Ranks for aerodrome maintenance, refuelling and maintaining Spitfires on Luqa air base.  One NCO and 18 men are working in support of the Royal Engineers Tunnelling Company working on the aerodrome.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 137.  Dealt with: 22 High Explosives, including 6 delayed action (8 x 250kg, 14 x 50kg) plus anti-personnel bombs and oil incendiaries.

(1)  Papers of Group Captain Arthur Donaldson, DSO, DFC, AFC, from The Air Battle for Malta, the Diaries of a Spitfire Pilot, James Douglas Hamilton, Pen & Sword 2006

 

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4-10 October 1942: Luftwaffe Gather in Sicily

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4 October 1942: 69 Squadron Rob Rommel

HEROIC RESCUE

Filfla

Quick thinking by a pilot of 227 Squadron today saved the life of an RAF observer whose aircraft had ditched in the sea near the Island of Filfla.  Pilot Officer Briffet was observer on one of nine Beaufighters recalled early from a mission to attack an enemy convoy.  The Beaufighter suddenly lost power and ditched into the sea killing the pilot, WO 2 George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force.

Four Beaufighters 227 Squadron were sent to locate the ditched aircraft and search for survivors.  RCAF Flight Lieutenant Dallas Schmidt spotted P/O Briffet struggling in the sea and threw down his own dinghy, tied to his ‘Mae West’ life jacket.  Briffet, who was unhurt, managed to swim to the dinghy and scrambled aboard to await rescue.

Meanwhile one of the four Beaufighters developed engine trouble and was forced to land on the sea near the dinghy.  The crew were picked up unhurt by the High Speed Launch, along with P/O Briffet.

MESSAGE FROM AOC MEDITERRANEAN TO 69 SQUADRON

“Grand work 69 Squadron.  Your attack by Fishingtons last night on a 6000 ton merchant vessel was clearly an unqualified success and probably robbed Rommel of yet another important ship.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 OCTOBER TO DAWN 5 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Mainly fine; lightning late evening.

0830-0905 hrs  20 enemy fighters approach the Island at great height but few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Spitfires engage the enemy; one is reported missing in combat.  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth’s aircraft is observed leaking Glycol as he crash lands at Qrendi.  The aircraft hits an obstruction on landing, seriously injuring F/Sgt Hogarth.  He is taken to hospital but later dies from his injuries.

0940-1025 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

1600-1945 hrs  Three Beaufighters 227 Squadron carry out searches for the dinghy of a missing Beaufighter: nothing sighted.

2003-0414 hrs  One Wellington 69 Squadron carries out searches for the Beaufighter dinghy: flares and flame floats were dropped but nothing was sighted.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant George Hogarth, Royal Canadian Air Force, 249 Squadron, RAF; Warrant Officer II George Fargher, Royal Canadian Air Force, 227 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Irving Gass, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 249 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 4 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clocks retarded 1 hour to Zone – 1.  Rorqual and P 43 sailed. Una and P 42 arrived.

AIR HQ  Nine Beaufighters despatched to attack convoy.  All aircraft recalled early.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons, one Mosquito to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron missing.  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron crash-landed.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance from Taranto to Cape Maria de Leuca at 1305 sighted one 5000 ton merchant vessel, three destroyers and one large float plane.  1925-0315 hrs  Four Wellingtons 69 Squadron, two carrying flares and two torpedoes, were despatched to locate and attack enemy convoy which was not located.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Number of personnel in hospital as a result of food poisoning has now risen to 60.

5 October 1942: Malta Sees Signs of Renewed Attacks

ME 109s in Sicily

Fighter pilots have been returning from intruder and reconnaissance missions over Sicily in recent days with reports of a build-up of Axis air forces on the Island.  This evidence, added to the increased numbers of fighters in offensive sweeps over Malta, has increased concerns that the enemy may be planning a major attack.  Today a Spitfire of 69 Squadron was despatched to make a detailed photographic reconnaissance of Trapani, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata which will be carefully examined by Air Command.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 OCTOBER TO DAWN 6 OCTOBER 1942

Weather   Mostly fine to fair; slight showers in the morning.  Lightning early morning and late evening.

0805-0900 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne on interception and to act as cover for 249 Squadron: no enemy aircraft seen.

0925-1110 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are airborne to intercept a raid of four ME 109s but see no enemy aircraft.

1325-1600 hrs  Ta Qali provides a standing patrol of two Spitfires over the High Speed Launch retruning to Grand Harbour: no enemy seen.

1413-1444 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy fighters which approach to within six miles of the Island and then recede.  One crosses the coast east of Delimara.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but there are no engagements.

2056-2123 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which approach the north east of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea before receding.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Detachment Luqa are scrambled to intercept but see no enemy aircraft.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 5 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 37 and Parthian swept out by Speedy.

AIR HQ  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Beaufort, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter 227 Squadron force landed in the sea: crew rescued unhurt.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released all day.

LUQA  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron were airborne on interception and made a reconnaissance patrol of the Cape Passero-Comiso area but saw no enemy aircraft.  One Spitfire 69 Squadron make a photographic reconnaissance of Trapin, Palermo, Messina, Catania, Augusta and Licata.

TA QALI  0720-0835 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.   1120-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: nothing sighted.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  B Company are carrying out coast patrol and Tal Virtu Observation Post duties for this week.

6 October 1942: Malta Infantry Prepare for Large Scale Ops

A major military exercise took place this morning at Mellieha involving Malta’s infantry troops.  The exercise, organised by 2 Brigade, started at 9 this morning and included a demonstration of Artillery operations on a large scale.  Troops taking part were members of 2 Brigade Artillery Group, 23rd Field Battery Royal Artillery, 49/91 Field Battery Royal Artillery, 1 Troop 48/71 Defence Battery Royal Artillery and 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Military leaders explained the object of demonstration which was to give Infantry troops experience in carrying out an attack under their own Artillery fire and to show the flexibility of Artillery fire.  The exercise was followed immediately by a demonstration of Allied and enemy weapons at Ghain Tuffieha.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 OCTOBER TO DAWN 7 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0950-1019 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy bombers: one drops bombs 40 miles north of Malta, the remainder drop bombs in the sea four miles north of Gozo.  Their escort of 24 enemy fighters approaches the Island at 23000 feet; only six cross the coast.  Malta fighters dive to attack a formation of eight ME 109s which take violent evasive action and manage to escape.  Two other ME 109s are engaged; 1435 Squadron P/O Lattimer damages one; Sgt Phillips’ aircraft is slightly damaged.

1820 hrs  C Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regiment report a white verey light eight miles out to sea due north of Della Grazia.

2158-2220 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft, none of which cross the coast: bombs are dropped in the sea.  Two Beaufighters 89 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept.  They pursue one raider but are unable to overtake it.

Military casualties  Lance Bombardier Ronald Harris, 12 Field Regiment, Royal Artillery; Gunner Emmanuel Pirotta, 11 HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery, died of wounds inflicted by enemy aircraft; Private John Vella, 3rd Battalion, King’s Own Malta Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 6 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde arrived from Gibraltar with petrol and stores and P 44 from patrol, both being swept in by Rye. Clyde berths in Grand Harbour. P 44 reported having torpedoed a ship which had been beached after attack by Royal Air Force.

AIR HQ  Four Spitfire sorties on offensive recce Sicily.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Douglas from LG 224.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Douglas to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire damaged: pilot unhurt.

HAL FAR  1515-1650 hrs  Five Spitfires carried out a reconnaissance sweep over south east Sicily.  One enemy aircraft is seen at deck level south of Biscari.

LUQA  2205-2217 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron patrols over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.

TA QALI  0725-0825 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.

7 October 1942: Victory Kitchens Threatened With Closure

Victory Kitchen

A Government Select Committee has recommended today that Victory Kitchens should be closed.  The recommendation is the conclusion of an investigation into the emergency food provision commissioned in September.  The study was launched following severe criticism in the press, both in editorial and letters sections, of the quality of food service in Victory Kitchens.

The Committee reported a lack of uniformity in taste or quantity and slated the cooks, citing examples of food being over or undercooked, even sometimes burnt or left raw.  Supervisors were also heavily criticised, with suggestions that few were up to the job.  The Committee’s recommendation for closure included the suggestion that instead all produce be distributed to the population via their rations.

The Government has issued a statement in response, questioning the basis for some of the Committee’s findings.  They rejected the proposal to issue food direct to the public on the basis that this would disadvantage those less able to pay a premium for produce.  However, it is accepted that the expansion of Victory Kitchen users from 20000 in August to some 100,000 today has created problems.  Urgent measures will be taken to address allegations in the report of poor cooking, wastage and pilfering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 OCTOBER TO DAWN 8 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Clear.

0745-0845 hrs  Air raid alert for 18 ME 109s which approach the Island at a great height: few cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept and locate the enemy but the raiders have the advantage of height so there is no combat.  Four Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa attempt to intercept three enemy fighters but the raiders turn back before they can be engaged.

1011-1047 hrs  Three Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled along with aircraft from another Squadron to intercept 23 plus enemy fighters approaching the Island.  The Spitfires are unable to catch the enemy.

1458-1525 hrs  Air raid alert for 20 enemy fighters in a sweep, of which only three cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled but see nothing.

Military casualties  Private Joseph Pisani, 1st Malta Pioneer Group, Malta Territorial Force.

Civilian casualties  Naxxar  Teodoro Azzopardi, age 23.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 7 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise swept in from sea by Speedy, P 35 swept out by Beryl.

LUQA  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicily: nothing sighted.  1512 hrs  One Spitfire 69 Squadron on reconnaissance sights a convoy of two merchant vessels off Palermo.  Spitfires of 69 Squadron also make photographic reconnaissance.

1st Bn HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT  During the period 1-7 October the Battalion has found two lorries, one motor-cycle and five other ranks for work on Hal Far aerodrome.  Two twin Lewis guns have been manned during the hours of daylight on Safi Strip for anti-aircraft defence.

8 October 1942: 9000 Houses Destroyed, 17000 Damaged

VALUE OF SHELTERS DEMONSTRATED IN MALTA  London, Thursday 8 October 1942

12 miles of tunnels dug for shelters

To the end of July more than 1300 Maltese had been killed in air-raids and 1600 seriously injured.  About 9,000 houses had been destroyed and 17,000 damaged. The Lieut.-Governor Sir Edward Jackson, who is now in London, in giving these figures added that the comparatively small number of casualties was because every man, woman and child had a safe shelter. The providing of this had necessitated 12 miles of tunnels and 18 months had been occupied in digging out shelters.

Lady Jackson said that the people of Malta were devoutly religious. The scene in a larger shelter during a raid was not likely to be forgotten. It was packed and in almost complete darkness, with a tiny candle in front of the Shrine. The sound of bombs was deadened by the prayers. They were not praying for themselves, but for the sailors, the pilots in the skies and the men behind the anti-aircraft guns…

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 OCTOBER TO DAWN 9 OCTOBER 1942

0807-0912 hrs  Air raid alert for one enemy aircraft which approaches to within 20 miles of the Island and then recedes.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1012-1047 hrs  Fifteen enemy fighters approach at between 22000 and 27000 feet, with another patrol of six ME 109s which cross the Island on reconnaissance.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne but do not engage.

1313-1328 hrs  Air raid alert for three ME 109s which cross the coast at 24000 feet before receding north.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1604-1636 hrs  Eight ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet and recede south of Filfla.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1830 hrs  D Company 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a light 4-5 miles out to sea.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 8 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Clyde to sea, destined for Beirut with passengers and cargo.

9 October 1942: Maltese Warned Against Black Market

INFORMATION OFFICE ADVERTISEMENT

What do I do…about the Black Market?

  1. I refuse to buy from profiteers.
  2. I report to the Police anyone who tries to charge me more than the lawful price for a controlled article.
  3. I combine with my friends to boycott known profiteers.
  4. I go without a thing, rather than encourage profiteering by buying at an excessive price.
  5. I do all I can amongst the people I meet to form a body of opinion which condemns profiteering. (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 OCTOBER TO DAWN 10 OCTOBER 1942

1022-1048 hrs  11 ME 109s cross the coast at 28000 feet over St Paul’s Bay and recede north east of Zonqor.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagements.

2058-2100 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft proved to be friendly.

Military casualties  Lance-Bombardier John (Carmelo) Bondin, 11th HAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery; Aircraftsman Arthur Robbins, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 212 arrived to join 10th Submarine Flotilla.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photographic reconnaissance of Patras.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Battalion bugles marched the George Cross into Rabat where it was placed on view to the public.

2nd Bn ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT  1730 hrs Battalion Beat the Retreat in Castille Square.

10 October 1942: Bombers Return – 15 Killed, 30 Injured in Gozo

EYE-WITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE TRAGEDY – click here

JU 88 bombers

Bombers were reported in the skies over the Maltese Archipelago in broad daylight this morning – for the first time in seven weeks.

Reconnaissance reports over recent days have provided clear evidence that the Axis are building up a large striking force in Sicily.  Photographs show some 600 aircraft across the Island’s airfields.  Indications are that a third of the Luftwaffe in the Mediterranean, and half their bomber strength, is now concentrated in Sicily.  The inevitable conclusion is that Axis high command has demanded reprisals for the successful raids on their supply convoys to North Africa.  As the air and submarine base for those attacks, Malta is now braced for further mass air attacks.

MOTHER’S COURAGE

Inez Portelli received a message that her daughter, who was staying at Inez’s sister’s house in Rabat, had been taken ill.  She set off on foot to take sugar and milk to her daughter; her son insisted on going with her.  Inez arrived to find, to her surprise, that her sister had taken her sick daughter to church:

“This appeared very strange to me because I was expecting to find my daughter in bed.  In the meantime there was an air raid alert and I hurried with my son and my brother-in-law to get cover in the nearest shelter.

Before I had gone down two or three steps, a terrific explosion sent us all reeling.  Suddenly all was confusion.  Panic-stricken people were screaming and running aimlessly around and as I looked out I saw people lying on the ground, motionless, while others were crawling away or writhing in agony and moaning.  My arm had been nearly torn away but I did not feel any pain.  My brother-in-law took one look at me and fainted.  I was laid on a stretcher and taken to [hospital]…I was taken into the operating theatre and when I came to in the morning I realised that my arm had gone.

Later on in the morning the hospital chaplain administered the Last Sacraments to me and I knew that there was little hope for me; I was so shocked that I begged them to let me die but the chaplain gently asked me whether I had any children.  ‘Yes, four,’ I said.  Then he said, ‘You will still be able to look after your children somehow with one arm but if you are not there anything could happen to them.’  Those words struck home and I was determined to go back to the family.” (2)

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT FOR WEEK ENDING 10 OCTOBER 1942

1.  Considerable increase in enemy air activity at the weekend.  4-9 October total 123 fighter sorties in sweeps of 15 aircraft.  10 October total approximately 120 planes including eight JU 88s.  Two JU 88s dropped bombs on Gozo: 10 civilians killed, 30 wounded.  Two ME 109 destroyed, two probably destroyed, six damaged by fighters.  Ack Ack no claims.  Photo reconnaissance shows further increases – now a total of 531 aircraft including 122 JU 88s in Sicily.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 OCTOBER TO DAWN 11 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine to fair; cloudless early morning.

0730-0901 hrs  40 ME 109s flying in various formations cross the coast at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are airborne and engage, damaging one ME 109.  One Spitfire is damaged in combat and crash-lands; the pilot is unhurt.

0932-0935 hrs  Air raid alert for fifteen ME 109s which fly at 29000 feet over Gozo and then over the south of Malta, eventually receding north.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled to intercept and locate the raiders which avoid combat.

1041-1119 hrs  Air raid alert: two JU 88s accompanied by 45 fighters approach Gozo from the north.  Malta Spitfires are scrambled to intercept and engage the bombers which jettison their bomb loads on Sannat, Gozo, demolishing 15 houses, killing 15 civilians and injuring 30 more.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta Spitfires destroy one ME 109, probably destroy two and damage three.  One Spitfire is slightly damaged in combat.

1348-1414 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron are scrambled to intercept 46 enemy fighters which turn away before the Spitfires can catch them.

1544-1623 hrs  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron and two of 126 Squadron are scrambled with aircraft of other Squadrons to intercept 30 plus enemy aircraft including six JU 88s which approach the Island.  The raiders evade the Spitfires and escape towards Sicily.

Night  Three alerts for a total of 10 aircraft of which only six cross the coast.  Flares are used over the Island.  Bombs are dropped in the areas of Gozo, Luqa and Dingli.

Military casualties  Aircraftsman John Pitt, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 185 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Gozo (Sannat)  Michael Azzopardi, age 6 mths; Joseph Cini, age 50; Saviour Curmi, age 80; Pauline Farrugia, age 70; Josephine Galea, age 30; Michael Galea, age 8; Margaret Galea, age 6; Joseph Galea, age 4; Grazia Muscat, age 50; Mary Muscat, age 30; Frances Pace, age 45; Catherine Saliba, age 35; Mary Tabone, age 17; Carmela Theuma, age 64; Lydia Zammit, age 2.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 10 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Porpoise sailed being swept out by Hythe.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar; one Liberator from LG 224.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort missing in transit from Gibraltar to Malta.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

10thACK ACK BRIGADE, ROYAL ARTILLERY  Order issued detailing move of GL set to Gozo.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 9.  Dealt with: High Explosives 4 (1 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg); anti-personnel bombs 20.

(1)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Ltd, Malta 1981

(2)  The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2017 in 1942, October 1942, Uncategorized

 

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27 September-3 October 1942: Disease Now a Greater Threat Than Bombs

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27 September 1942: Beaufighter Shot Down by Friendly Fire

A RAF pilot has died and his observer is in a critical condition after friendly fire struck their aircraft over Malta.  The Beaufighter of 89 Squadron was one of two which had to return early from a patrol to intercept enemy raiders.  As they approached, the Island’s anti-aircraft positions were on ‘Guns Tight’, orders to shoot only at aircraft once they had been identified.  However, the guns covering the approach to Luqa airfield were still on ‘Guns Free’ – ready to fire at any aircraft.

Beaufighter 39 Squadron at Luqa

Spotting an unidentified aircraft headed for Luqa, the gunners opened fire.  The Beaufighter pilot took evasive action, turning away from the airfield and looping back to make another attempt at landing.  But the aircraft had lost too much height and he was forced to crash land.  The Beaufighter burst into flames.  The pilot escaped from the top hatch as Royal Artillery personnel rushed to the scene, managing to rescue the observer, Pilot Officer Alfred Cumbers, who was badly burned.  Despite suffering relatively minor burns the pilot, Flight Lieutenant John Waddingham, died later in hospital from shock.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 27 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 28 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Good; visibility good.

No air raid warnings.

0735-0820 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: nothing sighted.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant John Waddingham, Royal Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 1942

P 35 HMS Umbra

ROYAL NAVY  P 35 attacked a large escorted merchant vessel but, as the first torpedo failed to sink her, she later followed up and attacked by moonlight, and obtained a further hit.  ML 459 and Swona carried out sweeping operations in St. Paul’s Bay and approaches. No mines were swept.  Beauforts unsuccessfully attacked an enemy convoy with torpedoes.

AIR HQ  Night  Three Beauforts of 39 Squadron were despatched to attack a southbound enemy convoy in the Ionian Sea.  Only one aircraft found the convoy which comprised four destroyers and a 5000 ton merchant vessel 120 miles south west of Cape Matapan proceeding on a sourtherly course at 12 knots.  One torpedo was dropped but owing to poor visibility the results were not observed.  Arrivals  One Liberator from LG 224; one Beaufort, one Wellington, one Hudson from Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  1100-1205 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron made a reconnaissance patrol over Sicily: no enemy activity.

TA QALI  No operations by 229 or 249 Squadrons.

28 September 1942: Navy Air Squadron in Convoy Attacks

Two night attacks were carried out tonight against shipping near Cape Spartivento, one by a Wellington of 69 Squadron and another by two Swordfish and two Albacores of the Royal Naval Air Service squadron based at Hal Far.

The Wellington left Malta this evening on the tail of a convoy of one 4000 ton merchant vessel and three destroyers which he located five miles north east of Spartivento, heading westwards.  The bomber launched a stick of four 500lb bombs at the merchantman and one burst very close to the stern.  Photographs taken later showed a merchant vessel, believed to be the one attacked, beached off Locri.

Albacore

Two hours later the four RNAS aircraft took off with orders to search for an enemy merchant vessel but found only a single Navigator Class destroyer about 20 miles off the toe of Italy.  They released two torpedoes, forcing the destroyer to take violent evasive action.  They reported a hit amidships followed by a large flash.  One Swordfish experienced intense and accurate light Ack Ack fire and was slightly damaged but returned safely to Hal Far.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 28 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 29 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

1705-1735 hrs  Air raid alert.  14 enemy fighters approach; only three cross the coast while the remainder patrolled to the north of the Island.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept: no engagement.

1815-1900 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on anti-E boat patrol: nothing sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Sweep of St Paul’s Bay completed and area now considered clear.  Rye swept P 44 out for patrol.

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out two offensive reconnaissances over Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.  Arrivals  Two Marylands from ADU 201 Group; three Beauforts, two Hudsons from Gibraltar. Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Liberator to LG 224; one Cant 506 to Aboukir.

TA QALI  229 Squadron stood down.  1325-1425 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol (one spare returned early): no sightings.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  1130-1300 hrs  100 Men of B Company and 100 of C Company stood by in the Dockyard in case of rioting.  Trouble was expected as the ASM was seeing a delegation of workmen who advocated more pay etc.  No incidents of any kind occurred: everything was quite normal.

2nd Bn ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS  Three day scheme began to test mobile role of Battalion.

29 September 1942: Enemy Fighter Strength Up

AOC MED CONGRATULATES RAF LUQA

Two messages have been received at RAF Luqa from Air Officer Commanding, RAF Mediterranean:

Sir Arthur Tedder, AOC RAF Middle East 1942

“Well done 69 Squadron.  Your good reconnaissance made possible torpedo attack on a fat enemy merchant vessel.  Keep it up.”

“Well done 39 Squadron.  Lieutenant Tilley put up a first rate show in his determination to attack in most unpleasant weather conditions.  A good job well carried out.”

AIR RAIDS DAWN 29 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 30 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

0930-1020 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far on patrol: nothing sighted.

1112-1205 hrs  Air raid alert.  30 ME 109s approach the Island in four or five waves.  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but do not engage.  Only 15 enemy fighters cross the coast.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.

1610-1635 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six ME 109s cross the coast and then patrol south of Filfla.  Heavy Ack Ack fire.

1600-1720 hrs  Nine Spitfires 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept enemy aircraft (one spare returned early).  Enemy fighters are sighted but turn ‘up sun’ and get away.  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are also scrambled: nothing sighted.

1815-1905 hrs  Two Spitfires Ta Qali on anti-shipping patrol: no sightings.

2100-2110 hrs  Air raid alert for a single enemy bomber: bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Mgarr  Santo Abela, age 14.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 1942

Minesweeper HMS Speedy

AIR HQ  23 Spitfire sorties over Sicily during the day: no combats.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; three Hudsons, two Beauforts from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Spitfire to Heliopolis.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort missing in transit between Gibraltar and Malta.

HAL FAR  1345-1545 hrs  Five Spitfires carried out a sweep over south east Sicily.  Enemy aircraft were sighted taking off from Comiso aerodrome and two E boats seen two miles off the coast: no combats.

TA QALI  0915-1010 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicily.  Enemy fighters were sighted but no combat took place.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  1130-1300 hrs  B and C Companies stood by again in the Dockyard in case of trouble.

30 September 1942: Meat and Fish Only Once a Week

The Government has announced a new menu for the Victory Kitchens, reducing the service of meat and fish to only once a week each (1):

  • Monday  Balbuljata (i) with peas
  • Tuesday  Macaroni with tomatoes
  • Wednesday  Minestra (ii)
  • Thursday Tinned fish, beans and tomatoes
  • Friday  Macaroni with tomatoes
  • Saturday  Minestra
  • Sunday  Meat with tomatoes and tinned beans

AIR RAID STATISTICS SEPTEMBER 1942

  • Total number of alerts to date  2927
  • Total number of alerts this month  57 
  • Air raid alerts night  17
  • Number of Blank Days 6
  • Number of Night raids 17
  • Raid Free Nights 13
  • Alerts for Own Planes 7
  • Total time from air raid alert to raiders passed  1 day, 2 hrs, 5 mins
  • Average length of alert 27.5 mins

Throughout the month the Army provided 200-250 men daily to assist the RAF in servicing aircraft, maintenance of aerodromes, etc.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 1 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

0815-0830 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept: no sightings.  Alert believed to be triggered by returning friendly aircraft.

0845-0850 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept: no sightings.  Alert also believed due to friendly aircraft.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                              Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  1540-1630 hrs  Offensive reconnaissance by four Spitfires over Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; four Beauforts to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort missing in transit between Malta and LG 224.

HAL FAR  185 Squadron released.

TA QALI  1540-1630 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: no sightings.  1755-1850 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol crossed over Biscari and Comiso aerodromes: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Strength of Battalion: 30 Officers, 614 Other Ranks.

4th Bn THE BUFFS (ROYAL EAST KENT REGIMENT)  Personnel engaged on co-operational duties at Luqa aerodrome: 1 Officer, 62 Other Ranks night; 1 Officer, 108 Other Ranks day.

1st BN HAMPSHIRE REGT  Throughout September two twin Lewis guns were manned during daylight on Safi strips for anti-aircraft defence.  No rounds were fired at hostile aircraft.  Throughout the month working parties at Hal Far aerodrome were: two impressed lorries, four Other Ranks manning the lorries; one Other Rank with motor-cycle on special police duties.

4th HEAVY ACK ACK REGIMENT  During the month the Regiment has only fired 90 rounds ARBT.  A new form of night barrage has been evolved in which each RCR as before works out the datas for its own gun positions.  Plots are obtained from the GL at very 10th second immediately following the buzz made in the circuit from RCR; the buzzes are also made in the guns circuit.  The FCO [Fire Control Orders] orders ‘Immediate – height’ on the next buzz guns start a stop watch on each position.  The FCO now works out the co-ordinates of the barrage point, based on a time from the executive buzz of 55 seconds and orders the co-ordinates.  Guns work out the date and apply it; gun positions subtract the time of flight (say 17 seconds) from 55 and fire when their stop watch shows 38 seconds.

1st Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  The coast in the Battalion sector was vigilantly patrolled each night in September and a mobile platoon is also performing intensive patrolling on the Island of Gozo.

1 October 1942: Diseases Pose Greater Threat Than Bombs

EPIDEMIC CLAIMS MALTA MEDIC

Major Douglas Armstrong of the Royal Army Medical Corps whose death was announced last Thursday [24 September], lost his life due to a disease from which he had saved countless others.  Still in his twenties Major Armstrong, who had commanded Malta’s Field Hygiene Section since January 1941, struggled through the intense blitz of Malta while every other senior medical officer was lost to the service.  Fighting an epidemic which was proving an even greater threat to the Island’s population than enemy bombing, the Glasgow born doctor himself finally succumbed to the infection.

Conditions in shelters increase infection risk

A typhoid outbreak among civilians was first identified some months ago, with a concentration of cases around the Luqa area.  The disease was believed to be carried by flies rather than water-borne.

SCABIES ‘RAMPANT’

A significant percentage of Malta’s civilian population has been affected by scabies.  A figure of 20 per cent quoted in June is now believed to have at least doubled.  Causes include hygiene problems due to the scarcity of water and soap, and the crowded conditions in the Island’s shelters and emergency housing which make washing difficult and aid the spread of this highly contagious disease.  Troops have also been affected, at about half the rate of the population at large.  “It was the general belief then that scabies is caused by a combination of under nourishment and lack of hygiene…Scabies was rampant in 1942. There might have been cases earlier. I was stricken by scabies in 1943, at a time when it was supposed to have been relieving. Large red boils covered my feet, hands and my bottom. They itched a lot and made me scratch frantically…” J A Zahra, 2011

MALTA DOG

A debilitating condition now threatens to undermine the effectiveness of the Island’s fighting forces.  An unpleasant form of dysentery known to the troops as ‘Malta Dog’ attacks suddenly and weakens the constitution of servicemen already significantly underweight due to reduced rations.  Sufferers can be confined to bed for several days, unable to return to duties until their condition stabilises.

For about a fortnight I was really off colour with symptoms I will not mention, beyond saying that all food tasted like fat, and was difficult to swallow. In addition I had a prolonged attack of [‘Malta Dog’] a form of dysentry, painful and exhausting, but that seemed to be always with us.” (2)

JAUNDICE

“One morning I woke with a splitting headache and high temperature which persisted all day. This with long hours of duty with little leisure at last forced me to go to see the Naval Surgeon. As I walked in he greeted me with ‘Hello Mr. Austin!, got Jaundice?’  So that was it.

‘I am sorry to say that you can’t go to Hospital, Imtarfa and Bighi are full and St Patricks has over 500 cases of Jaundice. It is caused by rat contaminated butter’. He continued. ‘Beyond Epsom salts I have nothing else to prescribe. What you need is plenty of green salads, which are not available. You must go to bed, eat only dry toast and potatoes boiled in their jackets, tea without sugar and milk, and nothing else whatsoever’.  (2)

SHORTAGE OF MEDICAL SUPPLIES

The lack of regular supplies to Malta creates worrying shortages of medical supplies to tackle and prevent disease as well as to treat wounds.  The severely reduced rations, as well as threatening to cause malnutrition, weakens the immune system and aids the spread of infection.  Without the emergency ‘magic carpet’ deliveries of essential items by submarine, the Island will face possible multiple epidemics.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 1 OCTOBER TO DAWN 2 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Cloudy, then fair to fine.

0634-1310 hrs; 1517-1940 hrs  Four Baltimores 69 Squadron Luqa carry out a search to the south east of Malta for a missing Beaufort dinghy – not found.

1005-1010 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three plus fighters approach to within 15 miles of St Paul’s Bay.  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept but see nothing.  The raiders do not cross the Island.

2112-2136 hrs  Air raid alert for three approaching enemy aircraft.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa is airborne to intercept but sees nothing.  Bombs are dropped in the sea 30 miles north of the Island.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Joseph Menard, Royal Canadian Air Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 1 OCTOBER 1942

P 46 HMS Unruffled

ROYAL NAVY  P 35 swept in by Hythe, and P 46 to sea. P 35 reported having sunk on escorted merchant vessel south west of Stravothi.  A flash and the sound of an explosion were reported by the military at about 2000 hrs, 8 miles west of El Blate. As P 46 was estimated to be in this position at the time, she was ordered to report, which she did at 2020.

AIR HQ  Spitfires carried out offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  2130 hrs  Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  Eight Beauforts to Shallufa.

HAL FAR  Owing to a severe crosswind 185 Squadron were not scrambled all day.

LUQA  0825 hrs  One Spitfire 69 Squadron photographs one 6-7000 ton merchant vessel with an escort of two destroyers off Cape Armi.  0920-1035 hrs  Two Spitfires 1435 Squadron carried out reconnaissance patrol.  Two RE 2001s were sighted: S/Ldr Lovell damaged one.  1510 hrs  One Spitfire 69 Squadron sighted two destroyers and two motor torpedo boats off Cape San Taranto.

TA QALI  1725-1820 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol: nothing sighted.

2 October 1942: Axis Troops Sick From Lack of Food

Axis troops lack food and water

A lack of food and water is causing significant sickness among Axis troops as Allied attacks disrupt supply runs through the Mediterranean.  Rommel’s Afrika Korps is now getting just a quarter of the supplies they need, thanks to combined air and sea offensives from Malta.

The German Field Marshal had informed Berlin that he needed 50,000 tons of supplies if his forces were to continue effective operations in North Africa.  During September alone, Allied Air and Naval forces in the Mediterranean have sunk 34000 tons of shipping at sea.  Daily attacks on enemy convoys by Malta’s bombers and submarines have disrupted convoys, crippling Axis tankers and merchant vessels.  Any supplies which did get through had to be landed at Tripoli and transported many miles to the battle front.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 2 OCTOBER TO DAWN 3 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fair to cloudy at first; fair in the evening.

0746-0914 hrs  Eight Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled.  Blue Section patrols over Grand Harbour while Black Section carry out a sweep over south east Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1010-1130 hrs  Eight Spitfires 126 Squadron Luqa are scrambled for reported raiders which do not approach close to Malta: no enemy aircraft sighted.

1420-1550 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1615-1645 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron are airborne to provide cover for friendly aircraft: no enemy seen.

1800-1915 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on anti-E boat patrol: no sightings.

2140-2205 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach close to the north east of Malta between 24000 and 28000 feet.  Two of the aircraft drop bombs in the sea, one five to ten miles east of Ta Silch and the other five miles north of Gharghur.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron Luqa is scrambled to intercept but does not encounter the aircraft.

2200-0030 hrs  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron airborne on patrol: no enemy aircraft sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 2 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Rorqual swept into Grand Harbour by Rye having arrived from Beirut with stores.

de Havilland Mosquito

AIR HQ  2200 hrs  Beaufighter on intruder patrol Sicily.  Arrivals  One Liberator from LG 224; one Spitfire from LG 28; one Mosquito from Benson.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Wellington, one Liberator to LG 224; six Beauforts to Shallufa; one Wellington to LG 208.

LUQA  0650-0750 hrs  Four Spitfires 126 Squadron were airborne on reconnaissance patrol: no enemy aircraft sighted.

TA QALI  0740-0850 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on reconnaissance patrol over Sicily: no sightings.  0915-1035 hrs  Nine Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol sighted two Macchi 202s and four ME 109s.  F/Sgt De Lara damaged one Macchi.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Thirty one Other Ranks were admitted to hospital suffering from suspected food poisoning.

1st Bn KINGS OWN MALTA REGIMENT  17 Platoon relieved 18 Platoon in Gozo.

3 October 1942: Enemy Bomber Force in Sicily Increased

Reports are coming in from Malta’s photo-reconnaissance pilots that enemy bomber numbers in Sicily are increasing.  After careful analysis of photographs covering Sicilian airfields at the end of September has produced estimates of 403 aircraft of all types.  Of these 83 are German bombers and 145 Italian bombers; 172 are Italian and German fighters.

PR SPITFIRE SPOTS CONVOY TARGET

This afternoon a Malta reconnaissance pilot reported an enemy convoy consisting of a 5000 ton merchant vessel escorted by three destroyers crawling south from Taranto.  Four Wellingtons – two carrying bombs and flares and two carrying torpedoes – were despatched to make a night attack on the convoy.  They found the ships 33 miles south east of Cape Santa Maria di Leuca.  Only one torpedo was launched and this scored a hit amidships on the merchant vessel, producing a red glow.  Four 1000 lb bombs were also dropped but the results could not be seen.  All aircraft returned safely to base.

FOOD POISONING HITS BATTALION

A possible outbreak of food poisoning has been reported by 1st Battalion Durham Light Infantry.  31 Other Ranks were admitted to hospital yesterday, followed by another 11 today, bringing the total number of cases to 42 out of a total of 614 men.

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 3 OCTOBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  War Office

1.  Enemy air – daylight:  six alerts for fighter sweeps totalling 92 aircraft.  No combats.  Night:  six aircraft approached – bombs in the sea.

2.  Own air – daylight:  Over 70 sorties of Spitfires over Sicily.  One RE 2001 damaged.  No losses.  Night: Total five Wellingtons sorties to attack convoys: near-misses bombs on two merchant vessels, probably torpedo hit merchant vessel.  Two Swordfish, two Albacore sorties to attack convoy: one torpedo hit amidships on destroyer.  No losses.

3.  Military damage and casualties: nil.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 3 OCTOBER TO DAWN 4 OCTOBER 1942

Weather  Fair to fine.  Lightning late evening.

0645-0810 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on anti-E boat patrol.

Caproni Re 2001 Falco

0905-0941 hrs  Air raid alert.  21 ME 109s and RE 2001s carry out a fighter sweep: about half cross the coast at 28-32000 feet.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Eight Spitfires 1435 Squadron Luqa are scrambled with fighters of other Squadrons to intercept.  Enemy aircraft are sighted but no combat takes place.

0920-1000 hrs  Two Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are airborne to cover the minesweepers off Grand Harbour.

1019-1032 hrs  Air raid alert for 12 enemy aircraft approaching the Island.   Sixteen Spitfires are scrambled to intercept but the raiders recede when 25 miles off St Paul’s Bay.

1115-1155 hrs  Air raid alert: aircraft are identified as friendly.

1515-1630 hrs  Seven Spitfires 1435 Squadron are scrambled to intercept reported enemy raiders but they do not approach Malta – no aircraft are sighted.

2258-2309 hrs  Air raid alert: are identified as friendly.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Harold Sansome, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 3 OCTOBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe swept Utmost out on patrol and then Parthian in with cargo from Gibraltar, followed by P 43 returning from patrol.

AIR HQ  12 Spitfire sorties on offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One DC3 to LG 224.

LUQA  One Spitfire 69 Squadron carried out photo-reconnaissance from Taranto to Cape Maria Leuca.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Total number of personnel in hospital suffering from suspected food poisoning is forty-two.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 1.  Dealt with: High Explosives nil; anti-personnel bombs 17; oil incendiaries 11.

(i)  normally eggs scrambled with tomatoes and onions – in this case powdered eggs were used

(ii) soup with vegetables and pasta

(1) Adapted from Malta Diary of a War, Michael Galea, PEG Ltd 1992

(2)  Extract from Autobiography of Leonard (Len) Austin, Foreman of Malta Dockyard, August 1939 – March 1943

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
 

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6-12 September 1942: Malta Prays as Children Cry for Bread

Malta – World War 2. First visit to maltagc70? CLICK HERE                                                               

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DON’T MISS NEXT WEEK – 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF GEORGE CROSS PRESENTATION TO MALTA ON 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

 

“We were very close to starvation…I remember one particularly moving scene when a five year old boy with tears streaming down his face kept asking his mother for a slice of bread and the mother, weeping, saying, I haven’t got any, my son’… none of us there had any food to give him.”  Carmen Sapiano (1)

6 September 1942: Malta Unites to Pray for Deliverance

Barracca Chapel, Valletta

The population of Malta, military and civilian alike, attended churches across the Island today to mark a National Day of Prayer.  At 10 o’clock this morning the Army’s General Officer Commanding joined troops at the Barracca Church for a special service, followed by a parade outside the church and march back to barracks.  This evening the GOC inspected the Home Guard at Qormi, Birkirkara, Sliema and St Julian’s.

ATTACK ON AXIS CONVOY COSTS THIRTEEN AIRMEN

This morning two 7000 ton merchant vessels from Taranto were seen to join up with 4800 ton SS Ankara and another 7-8000 tons merchantman from Brindisi.  The convoy then proceeded south eastwards towards the Greek coast, escorted by eleven destroyers and patrolled by six Macchi fighters and six JU 88s.

Receiving details of the convoy, Air HQ Malta ordered nine Beauforts of 39 Squadron into the air, with eleven Beaufighters of 89 and 227 Squadrons.  At 1330 hrs this afternoon, the attacking force caught up with the convoy 30 miles south of Cape Santa Maria di Leuca and attacked.  Five of the Beaufighters drew the fire of the enemy air escort, destroying one JU 88, probably destroying a Macchi 200 and damaging one JU 88, one Macchi 200 and a flying boat.

Meanwhile the remaining six Beaufighters swooped in to divert defensive flak from the convoy, raking the destroyers and merchant ships with machine-gun and cannon fire, and dropping twelve 250 lb bombs, scoring several near-misses.  Cleared to reach their target, the Beauforts released eight torpedoes, scoring at least one hit and another possible on a merchant vessel, which began to belch smoke.  The Beauforts also destroyed one Macchi 200 and damaged two others as well as one JU 88.

Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or anti-aircraft flak during the raid.  One Beauforts and three Beaufighters failed to return from the raid: thirteen Air Force personnel have been reported missing, presumed killed.  The crew of the Beaufort piloted by Flight Sergeant Watlington had a lucky escape when their aircraft was hit and damaged by enemy fighters.  Wireless Operator, Sergeant Hugh McIllaney and Air Gunner, Sergeant Leslie Tester, were both wounded by shrapnel.  The Navigator Sergeant Charles Grant, rushed help, administering first aid to stop the bleeding.  Sgt Grant then took over the Vickers gun to ward off further enemy attackers.  Despite damage to The Beaufort’s hydraulics, flaps, tail assembly and turret, Flt Sgt Watlington managed to fly it back to Luqa and make a safe landing.

Later reconnaissance missions report that only three merchant ships and ten destroyers remained in the convoy: one merchantman was reported beached near Corfu.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

1405-1414 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft come to within 20 miles of the coast and then recede.

1720-1830 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to cover a returning fighter sweep: no sightings.

1910-1935 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron search for missing aircraft.

Maqluba Church

2038 hrs  HQ Coy, 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment report a ‘golden rain’ rocket over west Zurrieq, moving towards Maqluba Church.  C Company patrol but report seeing nothing.  Rocket believed to have been used by villagers.

Military casualties  Sergeant Arthur Calvert, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant James Cunningham, RAF VR, Wireless Operator/Air Gunner; Sergeant Edward Cox, RAF VR; Sergeant Kevin Duncan, RAF VR; Lieutenant R Clifford Evans, South African Air Force, pilot; Flight Sergeant Roy Gibbons, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant Donald Sharman, RAF, pilot; Sergeant Michael Wadham, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Robert Watson, RAF VR, all 39 [Beaufort] Squadron.

Sergeant Albert Cusworth, RAF VR, Navigator; Lieutenant Frederick Noome, South African Air Force, pilot; Flying Officer Dennis Partridge, Royal Australian Air Force, pilot; Sergeant Anthony Vivian, RAF VR, navigator; all 227 [Beaufighter] Squadron.

Gunner Carmel Buttigieg, 3 LAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 6 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P44 to sea and then anchored at Marsaxlokk.  An enemy merchant vessel was attacked when in convoy off Cape Ducato, by Beaufighters and Beauforts, and was hit and probably sunk.

AIR HQ  Night  Four Wellingtons were despatched to attack enemy shipping: no sightings.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; five Wellingtons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC3, two Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington ran off the runway during take-off and crashed into a Beaufighter: crew uninjured. One Beaufort crashed on landing with hydraulic and turret trouble: crew uninjured.  Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or flak while on shipping strike: one Beaufighter was seen crashing into the sea, two others and one Beaufort failed to return to base: all four crews are missing.  One Beaufort’s Wireless Operator/Air Gunner was killed but the rest of its crew returned uninjured.  Two Wireless Operators/Air Gunners were injured on board another Beaufort; the rest of the crew were unhurt and all returned to base.  The crews of the remaining two Beauforts escaped injury and returned to base.

LUQA  0730 hrs  Holy Communion in Poor House Cinema.  2030 hrs  Community hymn singing.

TA QALI  0700-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron were despatched on offensive reconnaissance.  S/Ldr Woods attacked one of two 25 ton grey motor-driven two-masted craft, obtaining strikes on the hull and cabin with a four-second burst of cannon and machine-guns.  The other Spitfires did not fire, in some doubt as to the identity of the craft.  1110-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no sightings.

7 September 1942: Wellingtons Attack Surviving Axis Ships

RAF armourers prepare 500lb bombs for convoy attacks

The surviving vessels of the Axis convoy attacked by Malta air forces yesterday were today reported continuing on their course south eastwards.  Today three Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were sent to carry out a further attack.  Fifty miles north of Cape Aamer the Wellingtons came upon two merchant vessels with three destroyers as escort.  The bombers released twelve 500lb bombs which they reported landing within 10 yards of the larger merchant ship.  No damage report has yet been received.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0645-0745 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali search for a missing Beaufort crew: no sightings.

1210-1256 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and orbit the Island at 12000 feet: nothing seen.

0103-0118 hrs  Air raid alert: one enemy aircraft drops bombs in the sea five miles north east of Grand Harbour.  A Malta night fighter is airborne and chases the unidentified raider but is unable to intercept.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Wallis Brown, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

P46 HMS Unruffled returns to Malta after patrol

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P46 and Utmost in from sea.  While towing targets in St Paul’s Bay area, WD vessel Clive swept two mines with her towing wire.

AIR HQ 1928-2300 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, four Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Beauforts, three Wellingtons to LG 224.

HAL FAR  0748-0850 hrs  Seven Spitfires (one spare) flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Camp cinema: Tarzan Finds a Son.

TA QALI   1130-1240 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two returned early): no enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  B Coy fired light machine guns on Pembroke Range.  Other Coys on intensified training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Brigade ordered special vigilance for mine-watching posts.

Tuesday 8 September 1942: Maltese Go Hungry As Rations Prove Inedible

Thousands who were served at Victory Kitchens today with a new rationed version of Balbuljata (2), using powdered eggs with minced vegetables, threw the food away in protest.  This is the second time a dish has been rejected as unpalatable: a week ago liver stew was found to be too bitter to stomach.

As well as claiming the Balbuljata was inedible, people expressed fury at the small portion on offer: no more than two tablespoonfuls, with another two of peas.  The Government decided that due to shortages the dish must remain on the Victory Kitchen menu but subscribers will be allowed to opt out of the meal by paying for six meals instead of seven weekly.  So far, very few have taken up the offer as they have no alternative way to feed themselves.  (3)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch

1008-1032 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four ME 109s cross the Island at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are scrambled to intercept: one Spitfire is shot down into the sea off Bubaqra Battery.  The pilot bales out and is later picked up uninjured by the Rescue Launch.

1050-1125 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1550-1700 hrs  Ten Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept three unidentified enemy aircraft: no engagement.

1855-1920 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0001-0010 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within 15 miles of the Island.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                         Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ   2240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire was shot up by enemy fighters: pilot baled out, landed in the sea and was rescued uninjured.

HAL FAR  1127-1251 hrs  Ten Spitfires (two spare, which returned early) flew over Lampedusa: nothing seen.  1824-1932 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily as far as Comiso on Rodeo: no enemy aircraft seen.

LUQA  Camp cinema:  Rhythm on the River

TA QALI  0750-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two return early): no enemy aircraft sighted.  1500-1600 hrs  Ten Spitfires 229 Squadron and twelve of 249 Squadron on Rodeo (four of 229 return early).  Four enemy aircraft were sighted but no interception possible.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy commenced firing on Pembroke Range.  B Coy commenced changeover of billets Polverista to Dockyard.  C Coy normal training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Lighter down in the sea 214 degrees Ta Silch Observation Post, two miles out.

9 September 1942: Black Marketeers Face Jail

32 days prison for stealing a tin of corned beef

…we could no longer get enough bread to satisfy our hunger on the grounds that supplies of flour are just about enough to meet the needs of the registered families.  At that stage my family began to really feel the hunger brought on by the shortages…Protection Officers, with their staff, had the job of organizing the distribution and control of food to the families in their district. Each family was issued with a Ration Card. On it was written the number of men, women and children and the total weight of bread the family is allowed per day. Besides the allowance of bread, on the card was written the quantities of other foodstuff allowed per fortnight… At the back of the card there used be a number of squares printed with a number in each square [to] represent the day of the month.

Black market was rampant in towns and villages. The suppliers were normally the farmers who insisted on gold rather than paper money for payment…In view of the very grievous situation Malta was in at the time, the authorities took an extremely serious view of any stealing of goods which was costing so many lives and ships to bring in to the starving population and the garrison. Just one typical example: caught stealing one tin of corned beef off an unloading operation in the ports was punishable with thirty two days imprisonment.”  J A Zahra, 2011

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-0935 hrs; 1010-1040 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron at a time scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1330-1342 hrs  Air raid alert.  15 enemy fighters approach but none cross the coast.

1313-1409 hrs  Ten Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far and patrol over St Paul’s Bay and the Island: nothing seen.

2236-2308 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within five miles of Dingli, dropping bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                              Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy, Hebe, Rye and 4 motor launches carried out a clearance sweep from position 210 miles to the northward. No mines were swept. The sweepers were reported as a convoy by German fighters.  The two mines cut by Clive‘s towing wire the previous day were sunk by gunfire.

De Havilland Flamingo

AIR HQ   Twelve Spitfire sorties on offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  One Macchi 202 and one ME 109 destroyed for the loss of one Spitfire.  2250 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, one Flamingo, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire failed to return from a fighter sweep over enemy territory; believed force-landed: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  0930-1045 hrs  Seven Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo and attacked 3-4 enemy aircraft over Biscara.  Captain Kuhlmann shot down a Macchi 202.  Sgt Weaver, DFM crash-landed in Sicily and was taken prisoner.  1730-1840 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert: Fly Gang in a new show.

TA QALI  0650-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no enemy sighted.  1400-1500 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (one spare returned early).  A few bursts of light flak 45 miles north east of Gela.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  B Coy continued move and D Coy moved from St Clements to Polverista.  Remainder on training.

10 September 1942: Victory Kitchens Need Urgent Review, Says Strickland

Colonel R Strickland today moved a motion in the Council of Government to appoint a Select Committee to report on the running of the Victory Kitchens and make recommendations for improvements.  The food distribution system is now struggling under the sheer weight of demand: since 1st August, the number of subscribers has trebled to 60,000.  Many have felt forced to join since the Communal Feeding Department is now commandeering all available produce, leaving those outside the scheme unable to obtain meat or vegetables.  Introducing his proposal, Col Strickland highlighted the people’s complaints:

“Extreme dissatisfaction prevails regarding the running of the Victory Kitchens, and the lot of the housewife has become well nigh impossible…The personnel employed in the Victory Kitchens is not suitable…[lacking] adequate knowledge of local customs and of Maltese habits and tastes…The Department is buying supplies at prices above the established controlled price…Cooks maintain that too much food is given to them, they do not cook it, by next morning it disappears…The cooking is bad…Another serious thing [is the] unequal portions being meted out…” (2)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather   Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0735-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0835-0930 hrs  Four  Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to cover 1435 Squadron returning from a fighter sweep.

1003-1111 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far area scrambled on intercept patrol: nothing seen.

2000 hrs  Observers report three shipping plots three miles north east of the island.

2020 hrs  C and D Coys, 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report small craft in DELs, 30 degrees RA3. 

2030 hrs  Dorsetshire Regt report more craft in DELs: guns fire.

0005-0036 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach to within 10-15 miles of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Sergeant Roland Ainsworth, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR);  Sergeant Thomas Kirkham, RAF VR; Sergeant William Law, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant James Pilling, RAF VR; Pilot Officer John Pope, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Ruskin Rice, Royal Canadian Air Force; Sergeant Joseph Sloan, RAF VR; all 202 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  2130 hrs  Three MTBs were reported from the plot one mile from the coast between Madliena and St. Paul’s Bay. Nothing was sighted.

AIR HQ  0010-0240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  0636-0756 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing seen.

LUQA  Luqa beat the Merchant Navy in a cricket match at Marsa:  Luqa 107 for 6 declared; Merchant Navy 104.  Camp cinema:  Lady of the Tropics.

TA QALI  1000-1105 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on offensive reconnaissance.  Enemy aircraft were reported but none sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  One Officer and one NCO attended bomb recce course under Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal.  B, C and D Coys held weekly night exercise.

11 September 1942: Malta Commanders Gather in Secret

Bomb damage in Palace Square, Valletta

Malta dignitaries, military and civil defence personnel gathered in Valletta today in conditions of the utmost secrecy to rehearse for the formal presentation of the George Cross to the Island which takes place on Sunday next.  With the recent reduction in air attacks and the evident superiority of the RAF in the skies over Malta, the Governor and Commander in Chief has decided it is now safe for the important ceremony to take place.  However, for security reasons it has been decided not to announce details of Sunday’s event beyond Malta’s shores.

The George Cross will be officially handed over by Lord Gort to Sir George Borg, Chief Justice of Malta at 9.15 am in Palace Square, which has been cleared of debris for the occasion.  The Royal Malta Artillery have been chosen to provide the guard of honour and the band of the King’s Own Malta Regiment will play for the ceremony.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

1024-1038 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy fighter approaches the Island at 6000 feet to within eight miles of Grand Harbour, then recedes.

1200-1250 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on patrol: no enemy aircraft sighted.

2330-0042 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach the Island.  One comes within five miles north of St Paul’s Bay and another 15 miles west of Dingli: both drop bombs in the sea.  The third crosses the coast and drops bombs on the northern end of Ta Qali.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P35 was swept out by Hebe and proceeded on patrol.

AIR HQ  Two Wellingtons were despatched to locate and destroy a submarine in the Benghazi area: no sighting.  Arrivals  One Hudson, two Wellingtons from Gibraltar; one DC3 from Shallufa.  Departures  One Flamingo, one DC3 to LG 224; one Hudson to Gibraltar.

LUQA  Camp cinema: At the Circus.

TA QALI  0725-0820 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1125-1300 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1830-1940 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on shipping patrol: no sightings.

10th Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Dress rehearsal for presentation of George Cross to Malta.

12 September 1942: Malta Air Forces 40 Attacks in 7 Days

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  The War Office

Ta Qali

 

1.  Enemy air activity slight.  22 fighter sorties by day, 18 bomber sorties by night.  One bomber crossed the coast: bombs on Ta Qali.

2.  Beauforts and Beaufighters attacked a convoy of four merchant vessels and eleven destroyers.  One merchant vessel hit, one probably hit.  Two enemy aircraft escorting destroyed, one probable, six damaged.

3.  Military damage and casualties [in Malta] nil.  Training continues.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-1025 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1122-1226 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and patrol the Island between Comino and Zonqor at 14000 feet: nothing seen.

1216-1308 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are airborne as cover for returning Spitfires, patrolling ato 14000 feet, 30-40 miles north of Grand Harbour: nothing seen.

2143-2203 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach the Island at 23-26000 feet but drop all bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Qrendi  Grezzju Dalli, age 52.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe carried out search of QBB 273.

AIR HQ  Twelve Spitfires carried out an offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  Four Beaufighters were despatched on shipping strike: no sightings.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter swung off the runway during take-off: crew uninjured.

HAL FAR  1530-1626 hrs  Four Spitfires were despatched on Rodeo to south east Sicily: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert.

TA QALI  1135-1235 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast encountered heavy Ack Ack at 16000 feet, accurate at height being only 250-500 yards behind Spitfires.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 18.  Dealt with: 10 High Explosives inc 2 delayed action (1 x 1000kg; 1 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg; 1 x 12kg AP); 18 anti-personnel bombs.

(1) The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

(2)  Normally made with scrambled eggs, tomatoes and onion

(3)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Malta, 1981

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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30 August-5 September 1942: Malta Faces Malnutrition

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30 August 1942: Rations Cut Again – Meat Only Twice a Week

From:  Governor Malta                To:  Air Ministry             30 August 1942

Please pass to Secretary of State for the Colonies and Chiefs of Staff MidEast please pass to Minister of State Cairo.

1.  Unloading and dispersal of supplies from convoy is now complete except for aviation and benzene, fortress can hold out until early December.  Aviation spirit position has been reported separately to Chiefs of Staff in HQ Med Sig 0726 of 25/8.  Benzine consumption has been reduced to 15,200 gallons per week but even so stocks will only last until mid-November.  Benzine can be made to last until target date by drawing on 77 octane but this is likely to be required for blending with aviation spirit.  We have 600 tons of 77 octane available, of which 250 tons are held as fortress reserve of MT spirit and 100 tons are needed for consumption by naval and RAF craft.

2.  Target date of early December allows for following adjustments of consumption on civil side:

  • (i)  Bread ration for men between 16 and 60 will be increased by 3½ ounces per day to 14 ounces.
  • (ii)  Fat ration will be at half normal ration level during September but I hope to increase it to normal level at beginning of October.
  • (iii)  Regular issues of edible oil will be made at normal ration rates.
  • (iv)  There will be regular issues of coffee with possibly one period skipped.
  • (v)  Regular weekly issues of kerosene will be made as from 1st October but at summer rather than higher winter rate.
  • (vi)  Domestic electricity supply will be restored on 1st October.
  • (vii)  Brewing will be resumed as soon as possible.
  • (viii)  Present reduced rations of sugar and soap will be maintained, sugar being issued twice every three half-monthly periods and soap once very two periods.

3.  Victory kitchens now have 60,000 persons registered and 170 kitchens are in operation.  Further rapid expansion is possible but supply of vegetables cannot be further increased while potatoes are now almost unobtainable and meat supply is not as great as was expected and is already falling off.  In future it will be possible to provide meat on only two days a week instead of five, and this may later have to be reduced to one if registration increases as expected. 

Victory Kitchen

In this situation I have been carefully considering the future of the Victory kitchens.  Allowing for small increases in rations now being made, calorie value of rationed foods per day for a man between 16 and 60 who is member of average size family is 1300, or 200 calories below figure normally taken as minimum.  Outside rations, very little food is obtainable.  Fresh meat, fish and vegetables are all too scarce to be rationed, even if this were possible from other points of view.  Marketing of meat and vegetables is now under control of Government and no meat except poultry and rabbits and small amount only of vegetables is being sold on open market.  Victory kitchens provide only satisfactory method of distributing evenly what meat and vegetables are available and if we were now to revert to old arrangement under which kitchens provide meals only on surrender of rations allowing majority of meat and vegetable supply to return to open market, effect would be that poorer classes would get very little, while those who are prepared to pay any price would obtain what they wished.

4.  I am satisfied that in our present food situation it is essential to continue existing policy of providing one meal a day through kitchens outside rations so as to raise calorie value of diet to about 1800 calories.  This can only be done by introducing considerable quantities of imported supplies into the menus.  I have decided accordingly that all civil supplies of dried vegetables, dried eggs and cheese shall be allotted to the communal feeding department and that [pasta] shall be issued through kitchens on a substantial scale, estimated to absorb 230 tons of flour per month on an average registration of 150,000 persons.  This allotment of flour has been allowed for in calculating target date.  Menu will then consist of macaroni and cheese on two days, minestra on two days, meat and vegetables on two days and an egg dish on one day.  I anticipate that effect of new policy will be to encourage rapid increase in registration.

5.  In spite of increased issues described above, the civil food situation is still causing me considerable anxiety.  Rates of rations and general scale of diet remain low.  No signs of serious malnutrition have yet appeared but prolonged continuance of present food shortage must have its effect both on health and morale and shortage will be more seriously felt in winter.  Anything which can be done by special means at any time before another convoy is run, to supplement diet by importing concentrated foodstuffs or food of small bulk, will help greatly.  I will telegraph our immediate requirements of these types of food in the course of the next two days in case any special opportunity occurs to send such supplies.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 30 AUGUST TO DAWN 31 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine; little or no cloud: visibility 15-20 miles.  Wind variable becoming southerly; light.

No air raid alerts.

1105-1215 hrs; 1625-1725  Ten Spitfires 249 Squadron then ten 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on patrol: no enemy aircraft are sighted.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 30 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Clyde arrived from Gibraltar and was swept into Marsaxlokk by Hythe.  Una sailed on patrol.

AIR HQ  Day  Nine Beauforts escorted by eleven Beaufighters were despatched to attack an enemy convoy.  Night  One Beaufighter carried out an intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  Two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Four Beauforts to LG 224.

HAL FAR  Ten Spitfires went out to area 15-30 miles south east of Correnti Island and patrolled at 20000 feet over returning Beauforts.  No enemy aircraft seen.

TA QALI  Final movement of 248 Squadron pilots to United Kingdom.

31 August 1942: Alerts Total 2225 in 25 Months

AIR RAID STATISTICS AUGUST 1942

  • Total number of alerts to date  2225
  • Total number of alerts this month 141
  • Bombing raids  day 39  night  20
  • Raid-free days  3
  • Night raids  37
  • Raid-free nights  12
  • Alerts for own planes  8
  • Total time from air raid alert to raiders passed  2 days, 56 mins
  • Average length of alert 29.1 mins
  • Killed  41 (15 men, 12 women, 14 children)
  • Seriously injured  33 (10 men, 14 women, 9 children)
  • Buildings seriously damaged  58

OPERATION PEDESTAL UPDATE

Ledbury after Operation Pedestal, NWMA Malta

A total of 568 survivors from ships sunk during Operation Pedestal were landed at Malta. 207 of whom sailed in Penn, Bramham, and Ledbury on 18th August. The remainder being evacuated by air as opportunity arises.  The bulk of the cargo was unloaded by 23rd August, about 12,000 tons of furnace fuel, 3600 tons of diesel fuel, and 32,000 tons of general cargo having been received.  The enemy made no attempt to bomb any of the ships after they had arrived in harbour, or, in fact, once they were within comfortable range of shore based fighter protection.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 31 AUGUST TO DAWN 1 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Weather fine, visibility 20-30 miles.  Wind south-westerly, light; varying north westerly, light to moderate.

Day  No air raid alerts.

0915-1005 hrs; 1515-1645 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron then four of 249 Squadron Ta Qali carry out patrols: no enemy aircraft sighted.

2221-2246 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy bombers approached from the north but receded before crossing the coast.

Military casualties  Able Seaman Arthur Jones, Royal Navy.

Civilian casualties  Birzebbugia  Carmela Ellul, age 30.  Mqabba  Emanuel Zammit, age 7; Joseph Zammit, age 6.  Paola  Emanuel Paris.  Qormi  Spiro Saliba, age 40.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 31 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  ML carried out sweep of the area extending seaward of entrances to Grand Harbour and Marsamxett to the 40 fathom line, and swept two moored mines and one conical float.

AIR HQ  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Bisley to LG 224.

INFANTRY  R Company, Lancashire Fusiliers, took over area from E Company, 2nd Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, and vice versa.

1 September 1942: Anti-Personnel Bomb Kills Two Children

MALTA FIGHTERS’ SCORE NEARS 1000

Malta Radar stations detect raiders (NWMA Malta)

Reports released today show that 936 Axis aircraft have been destroyed over Malta or by Malta-based aircraft since Italy entered the war in June 1940.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 1 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 2 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine, visibility 10-15 miles.

1300 hrs  One anti-personnel bomb explodes on Ta Qali aerodrome, seriously injuring three Maltese children: two of them die in hospital.

1858-1907 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy fighters.  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept but the raiders turn back five miles from the Island.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Rabat  Francis Sammut, age 16; Carmel Tanti, age 14.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P35 arrived and was swept into harbour, having sunk a southbound 5,000 ton merchant vessel.

AIR HQ  2150 hrs  Five Wellingtons 69 Squadron were despatched to attack a 4000 ton tanker with an escort of two destroyers near Corfu.  They dropped four 250lb and twenty 500lb bombs with several near-misses: the convoy continued on course.  One Wellington missing.  0130 hrs  One Beaufighter carried out an intruder patrol over Sicily.  No enemy sighted.

Arrivals  Four Beauforts, three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire tyre burst on take-off, crash-landed: pilot uninjured.  One Beaufighter undercarriage collapsed on landing: crew uninjured.

HAL FAR  0930-1035 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far carried out a high level sweep over Correnti Island, Noto, Ragusa and Pozzala in Sicily.  No enemy aircraft or shipping sighted.  1315-1325 hrs  The Spitfire of Pilot Officer Cheek crash-landed on an air test: his tyre burst on take-off and he had to land ‘wheels up’.

LUQA  Luqa beat the Gun Operations Room in a cricket match: results Luqa 108 (Neale 46), GOA 97.  Camp Cinema: Captain Fury.

TA QALI  0705-0805 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron carried out a sweep over Sicily: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1200-1315 hrs  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron and nine 249 Squadron Ta Qali on a sweep over Sicily saw ships believed to be tankers outside Licata Harbour.  The Spitfires are met with heavy, accurate anti-aircraft fire over Licata at 11000 feet but see no enemy aircraft.

Nos 242, 314, 502 and 841 AME Stations, Observer Corps Detachments at Dingli, Torri L’Ahmar and Ghargur, Officers’ and Airmen’s rest camp at St Paul’s Bay taken over by this Station for administration and rations.

INFANTRY  0545 hrs  Exercise to test the alertness of sentries and communications within 4 Brigade.  Also rapid destruction of parachutists in the Brigade area.  Exercise began with firing of three Verey lights around Marsaxlokk Bay.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  A Company are performing coast patrol duties at Il Kaus; B Company are manning Tal Virtu observation post.

2 September 1942: Malta Attacks Force Rommel’s Retreat

OFFENSIVE OPS CUT AXIS FUEL AND SUPPLIES

“We have some very grave shortages.”  Letter from Rommel to his wife, 30 August 1942

Malta-based attacks on southbound convoys in the Mediterranean have forced Field Marshal Rommel to give up his attempt to retake El Alamein.  The Island’s air and naval forces have starved the Axis of more than half of the supplies they need to continue the battle in North Africa.  Rommel originally intended to begin a major offensive against British forces on 26 August but had to postpone due to a shortage of fuel, thanks to the sinking of two tankers in the Mediterranean.

Field Marshal Rommel’s plan stopped

With a promise that another convoy would set out immediately from Italy, at 2330 hrs on Sunday Rommel launched an attack at Alam el Halfa but came up against a massive minefield and a well-equipped British force under Lt Gen Montgomery.  But nine Beauforts and eleven Beaufighters had already set off from Malta to attack the supply convoy, which had been spotted by 69 Squadron photo-reconnaissance pilots.  At the same time destroyers, bombers and naval aircraft launched heavy attacks on Axis stores and workshops close to the battlefield.

Yesterday Malta-based submarine P 35 sank a southbound 5000 ton merchant vessel and the Island’s bombers stand ready to act immediately to any further attempts to re-supply the enemy.  Attacks continued today with Wellington bombers targeting a tanker and Navy Air Service Albacores striking a merchant vessel and escort with torpedoes.

After three days of relentless allied bombing and artillery fire and faced with a precarious supply situation Rommel has been forced to call off the attack and withdraw his forces.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 2 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 3 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair but cloudy.

0915-1020 hrs; 1015-1055 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali at a time on intercept patrol and sweep: no sightings.

1015-1045 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far are airborne on patrol: nothing sighted.

1303 hrs  Three enemy aircraft are reported approaching Malta.  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol sight one Macchi 202.  F/Lt Hetherington, W/Cdr Donaldson and P/O Farmer each fire a burst in turn, all obtaining strikes.  The tail of the Macchi is shot off and the aircraft goes down streaming glycol.  The remaining aircraft recede without coming within 25 miles of the Island.

1930-1950 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties   Corporal Arthur Simpson, Royal Engineers, Malta Territorial Force.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 2 SEPTEMBER 1942

P34 HMS Ultimatum

ROYAL NAVY  P34 swept out but returned to Marsaxlokk with a leaky DSEA hatch.

AIR HQ  1305 hrs  An offensive reconnaissance by four Spitfires over Sicily.  One Macchi 200 is shot down.  Night  Two Wellingtons were despatched to attack the tanker targeted last night, now 10 miles south west of Antipaxos.  The drop six 500lb bombs on the tanker, scoring one hit and causing a large explosion, followed by clouds of white smoke.

Arrivals  One DC3 from Shallufa two Beauforts one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One DC3 to LG 224.    Aircraft casualties  One Hudson tyre believed burst during take-off, crashed and burned out: crew uninjured.

HAL FAR  1720-1830 hrs  Five Spitfires carried out a sweep over Sicily and encounter enemy aircraft.  2129-0235 hrs  One Swordfish with flares and two Albacores NAS located and attacked a 5000 ton merchant vessel, escorted by two destroyers and a small flak ship, 15 miles north east of Cape Spartivento heading easterly.  They located the target just off the toe of Sicily and score hits with two torpedoes, one aft of the funnel and one aft of the bridge, followed by a violent explosion.  They leave the vessel down by the stern and belching clouds of black and white smoke.  A later photo-reconnaissance report showed the merchant vessel aground close to where it had been attacked.

3 September 1942: Reconnaissance Pilots Praised for Axis Convoy Hits

“The Air Officer Commanding sends personal congratulations to 69 Squadron (Reconaissance) for successful attacks on two successive nights, when Wellingtons scored direct hits on an important tanker heading for North Africa and also near-misses on destroyers.  The loss or even the disabling of the enemy tanker should greatly assist the British fighting Rommel.”

69 Squadron crew disembark Baltimore Luqa 1942 (c) IWM GM 1042

 

AIR RAIDS DAWN 3 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 4 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair but cloudy.

0935-1030 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far are airborne on patrol: nothing sighted.

1405-1510 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

1701-1720 hrs  Air raid alert.  Five Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy aircraft.  Two enemy fighters fly over Comino Channel at 20,000 feet.  Spitfires chase them back to within 10 miles of the Sicilian coast but are unable to intercept.

1845-1930 hrs  Six Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 3 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P34 sailed for trials and proceeded on patrol. Clyde and P43 were also swept out to sea.

AIR HQ  Departures  Two Beauforts to LG 224.

LUQA  Camp cinema: Tarzan Finds a Son.

TA QALI  1540-1635 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance circled Linosa and spotted a new building – ‘apparently’ a church.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

4 September 1942: Navy Albacores Disable Axis Supply Ship

Fairey Albacore

Two Albacores Royal Naval Air Squadrons were despatched today to finish off the merchant vessel beached after their previous attack on Wednesday night.  One Albacore scored a torpedo hit on the ship’s port quarter, while the other scored a direct hit with a 250lb bomb on the destroyer alongside, and straddled the merchant vessel with two other bombs.   Photo-reconnaissance later showed that the merchant vessel had a large gap in her starboard side.

Later tonight two Wellington bombers took advantage of intense darkness to attack a small merchant vessel 30 miles east of Point Alice.  They dropped a total of eight 500lb bombs on the ship but were unable to observe results, which will await confirmation by photo-reconnaissance.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 4 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 5 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Local thunder; rain with bright periods.  Visibility 10-15 miles.

0848-0908 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy fighters approach at low altitude, apparently intending a low-level machine gun attack, but turn back while still eight miles off the coast.  Malta’s fighters are airborne: no engagement.

1459-1544 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eighteen enemy fighters approach the Island; four are identified as ME 109s.  Some of the raiders skirt the Zonqor coast, while others patrol five miles north of Gozo.  Malta fighters are airborne: no engagement.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.

1700-1750 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

2230 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report a light out to sea, 80 degrees RA 4.

2313-2321 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft approach the Island but turn back when 20 miles north west of Gozo, dropping bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer William Storer, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; Private Ronald Rooke, 2nd Bn Devonshire Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 4 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Night  Two Albacores RNAS were despatched to attack a merchant vessel beached eight miles north of Bianca.

AIR HQ  1720 hrs  Six Beauforts and six Beaufighters were despatched to attack a convoy off Cape Spartivento but failed to locate the target.  Night  Two Wellingtons attacked a small merchant vessel 30 miles east of Point Alice, dropping eight 500lb bombs on the ship.  No results are seen due to the intense darkness.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire had engine trouble, force-landed: pilot uninjured.

HAL FAR  1000-1115 hrs  Four Spitfires carried out a Rodeo raid over Sicily but encounter no enemy aircraft.  PM  Seven Spitfires were despatched on a sweep over Sicily.  The leader had a faulty radio and broke formation: owing to a misunderstanding the rest followed suit and as a result the Spitfires returned to base.

LUQA  Luqa beat the RASC at cricket by nine wickets: RASC 36, Luqa 38 for one wicket.  Camp cinema: Second Chorus.

TA QALI  0650-0750 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on Rodeo: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1320-1430 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance sighted two unidentified aircraft but did not intercept due to a radio fault and subsequent misunderstanding.

1st Bn DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY  Major General Scobie, GOC troops Malta, visited the Battalion.  This is the second time the Bn has been under his command – Tobruk October 1941 was the first.

5 September 1942: Dog Fight Over Grand Harbour

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 5 SEPT 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  The War Office

1.  Enemy activity confined 48 fighter sorties by day and 6 bomber sorties by night.  One JU 88 crossed coast; good [searchlight] illumination.  Bombs on land.  One Macchi 202 destroyed, two ME 109s probably destroyed.  Own losses nil.  Recently there has been a large decrease in the numbers of bombers and fighters in Sicily, particularly German.

2.  Own air offensive continues.  150 Spitfire sorties over Sicily also 4 Beaufighters by night.  Malta based air attacks on convoys to Libya continue resulting in 1 tanker blown up, 1 tanker stationary, 2 merchant vessels hit by torpedoes, one destroyer hit by bombs; near-misses one merchant vessel, one destroyer.

3.  Military damage and casualties nil.  Intensified training being carried out.  Small parties employed on aerodromes.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 5 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 6 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fair; visibility 10-15 miles.

0735-0810 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

0910-0958 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires 249 Squadron and five from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy aircraft.  One Spitfire of 249 returns early, its hood blown off.

Grand Harbour

12 ME 109s and Macchi 202s cross the coast and circle over Grand Harbour area.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  The Spitfires intercept some of the enemy over Grand Harbour and others 20 miles off Zonqor.  249 Squadron engage six ME 109s. P/O Williams scores strikes on one.  P/O Giddings attacks a second; he sees no strikes but a panel flies off the port wing of the enemy aircraft.  Hal Far pilot F/Lt Charney destroys one Macchi 202.

1440-1510 hrs  Air raid alert. Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy fighters.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  The Spitfires see three ME 109s and four other fighters six miles east of Zonqor and chase them back towards Sicily: no engagement.

1725-1825 hrs  Ten Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept a reported formation of enemy aircraft: raid does not materialise.

2250-2317 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy bombers approach the Island; one recedes 40 miles from the coast.  The other, a JU 88, crosses the coast and drops bombs in the area of Birkirkara.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no interceptions.  Searchlights effect one illumination and Heavy Ack Ack engage.

2230 hrs  Observers of 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report several white verey lights off the Delimara area.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Tarxien  Joseph Bonnici, age 56.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 5 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One Beaufort, three Wellingtons, three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beauforts to LG 224.

HAL FAR  0640-0800 hrs  Five Spitfires 185 Squadron carried out a sweep over Sicily: no enemy aircraft encountered.

LUQA  Camp cinema: camp talent contest.

TA QALI  1145-1315 hrs  Thirteen Spitfires 249 Squadron (two returned early) and nine of 229 Squadron (one returned early) were despatched on a Rodeo raid.  Two enemy fighters are seen but not intercepted.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 26.  Dealt with: 7 High Explosives (2 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg; 1 x 50kg); 116 anti-personnel bombs, 18 oil incendiaries.

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com.

 
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23-29 August 1942: Malta Attacks to Halt Rommel’s Africa Campaign

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23 August 1942: RAF Begins ‘Circus’ Operations

Axis aircraft on Gela aerodrome

Three bomb-carrying Hurricanes (Hurri-bombers) escorted by Spitfires today carried out a ‘circus’ raid today on Gela aerodrome in southern Sicily.  Circus operations, introduced in 1941, involve sending a formation of bombers escorted by a larger number of fighters whose to act as bait and entice German fighters into combat on the RAF’s own terms.

The Hurricanes, of the Royal Naval Air Service based at Hal Far, took off at 1540 hrs this afternoon, accompanied by twelve Spitfires from Ta Qali.  Thick cloud obscured the intended target but S/Lt Pratt dropped his two 250lb bombs on military buildings north east of Gela town.  S/Lt White dropped his bombs on the town itself and S/Lt Elliot bombed Biscari Aerodrome.  In the poor visibility the enemy did not mount a counter attack and the mission returned safely to Malta at 1712 hrs.

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR COLLAPSES

Malta’s Lieutenant Governor Sir Edward Jackson collapsed today.  Initial reports suggest a possible heart attack.  He has been deputising for the Governor since Wednesday, while Lord Gort is in the Middle East.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 23 AUGUST TO DAWN 24 AUGUST 1942

Two fighter sweeps of six and eight enemy aircraft.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

HMS Hythe

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 23 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  While sweeping Rorqual and P 34 from sea to Marsamxett, Hythe had a gyro compass failure and while turning outside the swept channel in the vicinity 3, she cut two moored mines.

AIR HQ  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar; four Beaufighters to EDCU.

24 August 1942: ‘Malta Punishes Enemy Raiders’

Valletta, Sunday

“On Friday afternoon Royal Air Force fighters destroyed five enemy aircraft over Malta.  After a raidless night, a fair-sized enemy fighter sweep approached the coast yesterday, but turned back and avoided combat when they saw British aircraft approaching.”  The Mercury, Hobart, Tasmania, 24 August 1942

RAF MOUNT RODEO ATTACKS

Malta Spitfires launched their first ‘Rodeo’ attacks over Sicily today.  These hit and run fighter sweeps are designed to be surprise attacks on selected targets, in which Spitfires swoop to very low level and strafe airfields, dockyards and road and rail transport installations.  Despite the high risk involved in such attacks, all 15 Spitfires engaged in today’s raid returned safely.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 24 AUGUST TO DAWN 25 AUGUST 1942

Day  Three enemy aircraft approach the Island but do not cross the coast.  Spitfires are scrambled on intercept patrols: no engagement.

Night  No air raids.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer Lawrence Dewhurst, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 39 Squadron; Flying Officer Albert Turner, RAF VR, 39 Squadron; Sergeant George Leadbeater, RAF VR, 39 Squadron; Sergeant John Littlewood, RAF VR, 39 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 24 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 43 was swept in and P 46 out to sea on patrol.  The tanker attacked on 21st August was reported ashore in Saiada Bay.

AIR HQ  Eight Beauforts of 39 Squadron and eight Beaufighters of 227 Squadron of which three carried bombs attacked a convoy of two destroyers and a 7000 ton tanker, in position 272 degrees, Antipaxos 39 miles, course 130 degrees, 11 knots.  Although no claims were made, an apparent explosion was seen on the tanker, further results were unobserved.  One Beaufort was shot down during the attack.  Beaufighters dropped three 250lb GP bombs which slightly overshot.  One JU 88 was shot down over the convoy by Beaufighters.

Night  Two Wellingtons were despatched to attack the enemy tanker which had been beached in Saiada Bay, Corfu, after the Beaufort strike on 21 August.  Thirty-five 45lb fire bombs were dropped, all falling within 400 yards of the vessel, resulting in small explosions on the water and flames lasting about six minutes, followed by black smoke for another five minutes.

Arrivals  One Catalina, four Beauforts, four Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Catalina to Aboukir.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort failed to return from shipping strike:crew missing.  One Beaufort’s tyre burst and crash landed: crew uninjured.

25 August 1942: Pedestal Commander Reports on Convoy

Vice Admiral Syfret

Vice-Admiral E N Syfret today submitted his full report on Operation Pedestal to the Admiralty.  The report gives a detailed account of the convoy, from the assembly of ships in the Clyde, their first passage to Gibraltar and the repeated enemy attacks through the Mediterranean.

READ OPERATION PEDESTAL FULL REPORT – CLICK HERE

RAF ATTACK TANKER

21 Spitfires today carried out a second Rodeo raid over Sicily and six Beaufighters escorted by six Spitfires attacked an Axis fuel tanker off Tripoli.  The raids were not without casualties:  two Spitfires ditched into the sea with the loss of their pilots.  A Baltimore sent on search patrol failed to return.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 25 AUGUST TO DAWN 26 AUGUST 1942

AM  His Excellency the Governor and Commander in Chief returns from the Middle East.

1139 hrs  30 plus enemy fighter aircraft approach the Island but only half cross the coast.  Spitfires engage.

1520 hrs  Six enemy aircraft approach the Island, believed to be on reconnaissance.  Malta Spitfires scrambled: no engagement.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer Basil Butler; Royal Canadian Air Force; Flying Officer Reginald Round, Royal New Zealand Air Force; both 249 Squadron.  Sergeant Eric Cragg, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flying Officer John Foster, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Raymond Harvey, RAF VR; Sergeant Mervyn McCrea, RAF VR; all 69 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 25 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hebe swept Utmost to sea on patrol.

AIR HQ  Arrivals  One DC3 from Bilbeis; two Beauforts, eight Wellingtons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Four Hudsons to Gibraltar; two DC3s, four Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires shot down in the sea: pilots missing, believed killed.  One Baltimore failed to return from search: crew missing.

LUQA  During the period 21-25 August there were no attacks on the aerodrome.  Station strength is decreasing.  Camp Cinema cleared and is running.

26 August 1942: Spitfire Pilots Shot Down in Defence of Malta

Two Spitfires pilots of 229 Squadron were lost this morning after they went to intercept a large formation of enemy aircraft approaching from Sicily:

“Ten miles north-east of the island of Comino the Squadron sighted a pair of Messerschmitts at 27,000 feet and then six more unidentified fighters at sea level. One section dived to investigate the unidentified aircraft during which Sergeant Cornish crashed into the sea, either shot down or having failed to pull out of the dive. Flying Officer Newman flying V S Spitfire EP190 reported that he was circling an aircraft in the sea; this was the last contact with him. Both pilots failed to return. It is thought that Flying Officer Newman had fallen victim to the guns of Ltn Schiess of Stab/JG53, although another pilot of Stab/JG53 also claimed a Spitfire during the same sortie, this was not confirmed.” (1)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 26 AUGUST TO DAWN 27 AUGUST 1942

Day  Two air raid alerts for a total of 56 enemy aircraft: only a few fighters cross the coast.  Army General Officer Commanding visited various gun sites with Commander, Royal Artillery.

JU 88 crashed at Ta Qali (NWMA Malta)

Night  Two alerts for a total of 18 aircraft: 13 cross the coast and drop bombs on Luqa and Hal Far.  One JU 88 is destroyed.

0008-0110 hrs  Thirteen German and Italian aircraft drop high explosive and incendiary bombs on Luqa and the Safi strip, causing superficial damage, and on Hal Far, damaging NAS Offices.  Houses are demolished at Kirkop.

Military casualties  Sergeant Clifford Cornish, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flying Officer Dudley Newman, RAF VR; both 229 Squadron.  Gunner Alec Balaam, 168 Battery, 74 LAA Regiment, Royal Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

Enemy casualties  Crew of JU 88 bomber, shot down and killed: Unteroffizier Franz Diedl, Air Gunner and Unteroffizier Franz Rohringer, Observer.  Survived and taken prisoner: Feldwebel Ernst Klaus, Pilot and Unteroffizier Kurt Klawitter, Wireless Operator.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 26 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Rye swept Rorqual to sea.

AIR HQ Two [bomb-carrying] Hurricanes RNAS, operating with a “Circus” [of Spitfires], dropped bombs on Biscari aerodromes and military buildings.  Results were unobserved.

Night  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron made a successful machine-gun and cannon attack on Marsala flying boat station.  One merchant vessel with a chance light was attacked and the light extinguished, and one De 18 was shot down in flames.

Arrivals  One DC3 from Shallufa; one Bisley, one Wellington, three Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Beauforts, one DC3, four Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  Two Spitfires missing on patrol; presumed enemy action: both pilots missing.

27 August 1942: Malta’s Air and Sea Forces Disrupt Rommel’s Supplies

SPITFIRE RODEO STRIKE SUCCESS

German Junkers aircraft, Comiso airfield

A bold series of Rodeo operations was mounted from Malta today on the aerodromes of Sicily.  Following recent photo-reconnaissance reports of increased numbers of Axis bombers in the area, three Spitfire Squadrons – a total of over 30 aircraft – were sent to carry out the high-risk low-level raids on Biscara, Comiso and Gela.  29 Axis aircraft were destroyed on the ground and 10 more in air combat, plus others damaged – for the loss of two Spitfires.  Wing Commander Arthur Donaldson recalled the loss of his second in command as they attacked Biscara:

“We maintained complete RT silence so as to arrive unheralded.  My Squadron was to attack Biscara.  The flak was intense.  I looked across at poor old Walter Churchill, and at that very moment he was shot down in flames, crashing in the middle of the aerodrome.  I saw a Dornier bomber about to take off and by the time he was in my sights he was airborne.  I chased him for about twenty miles.  He had smoke pouring out of him and he was losing height; and disappeared below a small hill.  I was not able to see him hit the ground, but it was obvious that he was a dead duck.” (2)

AXIS FORCES HARASSED

Meanwhile attacks by Malta-based forces on southbound Axis convoys are hitting home, as war in the Western Desert reaches a critical point.  Beauforts and Beaufighters sank a merchant vessel and damaged its escorting destroyer north of Benghazi, with the loss of one Beaufighter.  A Malta-based submarine sank a second merchant vessel in a torpedo strike.  The attacks are key to deterring a major planned offensive by German forces in North Africa, according to a US news agency:

Field Marshal Rommel in North Africa

“An attack in Egypt by Rommel is expected at any time, according to a radio dispatch from the special correspondent of the “New York Times” in the Western Desert. He says that the RAF is attacking streams of German trucks and supplies which are moving up to the front. They are causing death and havoc, but the stream continues to move up, bringing nearer “Der Tag” [The Day] which many observers believe will be an August day.

There is an air of alertness and expectancy along the El A|amein front: “It may be tonight,” said one British captain. “Our tanks are standing by in case anything happens.” It is not thought that Rommel will delay much longer, unless he has experienced greater supply difficulties than the British observers expected. The British and Dominion forces are taking the utmost precautions to keep themselves informed of Rommel’s movements. They are determined to avert a surprise attack.”  The Advertiser, Adelaide, 28 August 1942

AIR RAIDS DAWN 27 AUGUST TO DAWN 28 AUGUST 1942

Day  Two air raid alerts for a total of eleven enemy aircraft which approach the Island Spitfires intercept and no aircraft cross the coast.

Night  No raids.

Military casualties  Group Captain Walter Myers Churchill, DSO, DFC, Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Force), 605 Squadron; Flying Officer Percy Johnston, Royal Canadian Air Force, 200 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Eric O’Hara, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR), 227 Squadron; Sergeant Kenneth Seddon, RAF VR, Navigator with 227 Squadron.

Civilian casualties (see Air Raids 26 to 27 Aug)  Mqabba  Michael Cachia, age 11; Emmanual Zammit, age 7; Joseph Zammit, age 6.  Qormi  Spiru Saliba, age 40.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 27 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P 35 reported having sunk a southbound MV in position 35-39N, 23-05E and Beaufort aircraft sank another MV in 33-59N, 20-57E.

AIR HQ  Eight Beauforts 39 Squadron and nine Beaufighters 227 Squadron, five with bombs, attacked a convoy comprising one destroyer and one 6000 ton merchant vessel, patrolled by one JU 88 and one Cant Z 1007, in position 329 degrees Cape Aamer 73 miles, course 190 degrees, speed 10 knots.  Beaufighters attacked first, dropping seven 250lb GP bombs and scoring one hit on the stern of the merchant vessel.  They also raked the merchant vessel and destroyer with machine guns and cannons from deck level.  The destroyer was left smoking from the stern.  Beauforts then attacked with torpedoes, scoring three hits on the merchant vessel which blew up and was left ablaze, and sinking with decks awash and back broken. The escorting Cant was destroyed by Beaufighters which also damaged the JU 88.

Night  Two Hurricanes made a bombing attack on Gela and Comiso aerodromes.  Results were unobserved owing to intense flak.  One Beaufighter 89 Squadron attacked the seaplane hangar at Syracuse with machine gun and cannon fire, scoring many hits.  Motor transport near Pachino was also attacked and damaged.

Arrivals  One DC3 from Shallufa; one Spitfire from Burg el Arab; two Beauforts from Gibraltar.  Departures Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire missing on operation due to enemy action: pilot missing, believed killed.  One Spitfire failed to return from fighter sweep; believed force-landed: pilot missing.  One Beaufighter believed hit by enemy flak while on shipping strike: crew missing.

28 August 1942: Malta Must Survive on Minimum Supplies, Warns Governor

In a radio broadcast today, the Governor and Commander in Chief warned the people of Malta of further hardships to come.  He asked their help to ensure the survival of the Island until a future convoy can reach them:

“Recently we have seen four merchant ships and an oiler reach Malta; this represents the largest number of ships which has arrived in the GrandHarbour since September of last year.  No sight could have been more welcome to us all than the arrival of the convoy after so many weeks of anxious waiting…

Ohio is towed into Grand Harbour (NWMA Malta)

When the last ship of the convoy, the US tanker Ohio, entered Grand Harbour as the sun rose on August 15, everyone in Malta was mindful of how the nine days of united prayer had been answered and was thankful.  We are also conscious that, when so many have risked so much and when so many lives have been lost to bring supplies to us from Britain, we also have a duty to perform ourselves.  These convoys are very hazardous operations and, were we to be improvident about the supplies which have reached us, we would do a real disservice not only to those who dared all to succour us, but also to ourselves.  It is our bounded duty to eke out our available stores to carry us forward as far as possible on the road to victory…

Convoys, such as this last convoy, are magnificent achievements, but they cannot be constantly repeated, and we must now steel ourselves to last out until a new target date.  We will play our part, as Malta has consistently played it in the past.  Our aim must be to keep our consumption of all foodstuffs and other commodities at the lowest possible level and so put off, for as long as we can, the date when another convoy has to reach our shores.” (3)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 28 AUGUST TO DAWN 29 AUGUST 1942

Day  One air raid alert for 14 enemy fighters on patrol.

Night  Three air raid alerts for a total of four Italian aircraft, two of which drop bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer George Bishop, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; Flight Sergeant Donald Leitch, Royal Canadian Air Force; Flight Lieutenant Ernest Magruder, Royal Air Force, 229 Squadron; Flight Lieutenant John Wallis, Royal Air Force, 42 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 28 AUGUST 1942

AIR HQ  Rodeo attack by 16 Spitfires over south east Sicily.  Night  Three Hurricanes RNAS carried out an intruder patrol over Comiso aerodrome; bombs were dropped but no results seen.

Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire missing over the sea: pilot missing.  One Spitfire had airscrew failure and crashed on land: pilot uninjured.

29 August 1942: Electricity to Stay Off Until 1 October

CONVOY CREWS VIP WELCOME

Sir Ronald Mackenzie Scobie

The General Officer Commanding Major General Scobie performed the official opening of a boxing match at the Command Fair.  The match, also attended by the Governor, was organised in aid of the Malta Convoy Fund recently set up to assist the widows and families of those lost during Operation Pedestal.  Free seats were allocated to the Merchant Navy for the event.  During his opening speech, Major General Scobie paid tribute to the seamen and thanked them for bringing the surviving convoy ships safely into Grand Harbour.

Today’s free match tickets are part of a series of events to show Malta’s appreciation of the ordeal during the Santa Marija convoy experienced by the merchant seamen.  Welcomed by enthusiastic crowds everywhere, their itineraries have included a tour of Mdina and a visit to Mosta Rotunda, as well as a demonstration of small arms fire at the Weapon Training School at Ghajn Tuffieha Bay.  Despite their exhaustion, a Merchant Navy team managed to hold Sliema Wanderers to a 1-1 draw in a football match at the Empire Stadium in Gzira.

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 29 AUG 42

From: Governor & C in C Malta                To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt: The War Office

1.  Enemy air: activity during daylight confined to small fighter sweeps.  Approx 148 fighters approached Island.  One HE 111, one ME 109 destroyed; three ME 109s probably destroyed; four ME 109s, one MC 202 damaged.  Four Spitfires missing, four damaged (pilots safe).  Approx 25 bombers approached at night, only 13 crossed coast.  Bombs aerodrome area.  No military damage.  One JU 88 destroyed by Beaufighter; one JU 88 destroyed, one damaged by Ack Ack.

2.  Own air:  offensive sweeps by Spitfires over Sicily destroyed six enemy aircraft, four probable, one damaged in the air, others on the ground; shot up personnel and buildings.  Two day attacks by escorted Hurribombers on Sicilian aerodromes.  Beaufighters and Hurribombers also over Sicily by night.  Nine Beauforts and eight Beaufighters sunk one merchant vessel, destroyed two JU 88s, one Cant; damaged one JU 88, for loos of two aircraft.  Other strike unsuccessful.

3.  Military damage and casualties nil.

4.  Convoy completely unloaded without incident.  Slight increase in civilian bread ration announced; kerosene ration increased; electricity to be restored from 1 October; other slight improvements.  Motor transport spirit cut further.  TOO nil.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 29 AUGUST TO DAWN 30 AUGUST 1942

Day  One enemy fighter sweep by 15 aircraft.

Night  One Italian bomber approached and dropped bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Pilot Officer Dennis Pollock, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 1435 Squadron; Private Michael Debono, 3rd Battalion, King’s Own Malta Regiment; Gunner Arthur Mundy, 186 Battery, 74 LAA Regiment, Royal Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 29 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe sailed and anchored at Marsaxlokk for the night.

AIR HQ  Eight Beaufighters 39 Squadron and eight Beaufighters 227 Squadron, four with bombs, attacked an enemy convoy comprising one 4-5000 ton tanker and one destroyer, escorted by one flying boat, one JU 88 and seven Macchi 202s, in position 120 degrees Ugento 10 miles, course 180 degrees 8 knots.  The Beaufighters attacked first, raking the tanker and destroyer with machine-gun and cannon fire, and dropping six 250lb bombs on the tanker, scoring near misses.  Beauforts then dropped four torpedoes scoring one direct hit amidships and one probable hit.  The tanker immediately blew up and burst into flames.  Later photos show the whole tanker ablaze, emitting dense clouds of black smoke.

Arrivals  One DC3 from Shallufa.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one DC3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire overshot on landing; struck hole in aerodrome: pilot uninjured.  One Spitfire believed shot down by enemy fighters: pilot missing, believed killed.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 29.  Dealt with: 4 High Explosives (1 x 500kg; 2 x 250kg; 1 x 50kg); 55 anti-personnel bombs.

(1) From http://chippenham1939-1945; source Wiltshire Gazette, 3 Sept 1942 and Spitfires Over Malta, Brian Cull and Frederick Galea

(2) Papers of Group Arthur Donaldson from The Air Battle for Malta, James Douglas-Hamilton, Pen & Sword 2006

(3) Malta Diary of a War, Michael Galea, PEG Ltd, 1992

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2017 in 1942, August 1942, Uncategorized

 

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16-22 August 1942: Convoy Supplies Will Feed Malta For 3 Months

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Malta is filled with admiration for the gallant efforts made to pass the convoy to the Island.  We thank you and are most grateful.”   Lord Gort to Chief of Naval Staff, Admiralty

WHILE MALTA CELEBRATES SANTA MARIJA CONVOY, COMMANDERS FACE SHORTFALL

Fuel and cooking oil delivered via Pedestal (c) IWM GM1448

While the Island continues to celebrate the arrival of supply ships and the oil tanker Ohio, behind the scenes Malta’s commanders are weighing up the real impact, if any, the delivery will have on rations and military operations.  The fuel off-loaded from Ohio will undoubtedly enable Malta’s air and submarine forces to defend the Island while mounting renewed attacks on enemy convoys.

At the same time, the Governor faces the hard fact that the food and general supplies delivered last week are only enough to extend Malta’s survival for a further three months.  Perhaps the greatest benefit of Operation Pedestal for the Maltese and the military garrison, is improved morale, as they now feel less isolated from their allies far beyond the Mediterranean.  It is hoped that these raised spirits will carry them through the undoubted further hardships to come.

SEAMEN REMEMBER LOST COMRADES

“We were escorting the damaged Indomitable back to Gibraltar. A typical Mediterranean evening, the sea flat calm, the sun still high in a clear blue sky and the silence was sheer bliss after the deafening clangour of the previous few days. Suddenly we could feel the ship losing speed, the flag was lowered to half-mast and our attention drawn to Indomitable. From the stern of the ship we could see bundles toppling into the sea as ‘Indom’ buried her dead. There were some 50 of them – a sight that remains vivid in my memory to this day.”  L Myers, HMS Rodney, WW2 People’s War (1)

16 August: A Day Without Warning

AIR RAIDS DAWN 16 AUGUST TO DAWN 17 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine: visibility 10-15 miles.

0810-0905 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron and two of 229 Squadron Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

0945-0955 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron on patrol: one had an oil leak and radio transmission was not working so they returned.

1045-1145 hrs; 1100-1210 hrs; 1105-1235 hrs; 1115-1230 hrs  Patrols by three to eight Spitfires 229 and 249 Squadrons: no sightings.

PM  Two patrols carried out by four Spitfires from Hal Far per patrol. 

1700-1810 hrs; 1800-1910 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on patrol at a time: nothing sighted.

1820-1918 hrs  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far patrolled at 16000 feet between Grand Harbour and Gozo.

1900-2005 hrs; 1950-2030 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 then two of 249 Squadron on patrol: nothing sighted.  The second patrol returned early due to low cloud.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 16 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Three Albacores of Naval Air Squadron searched without success for a merchant vessel reported to the north west of Malta.

AIR HQ  Departures  Two Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Liberator to Fayid.

17 August: Navy Thanks RAF For Convoy Protection

The following is a précis of a message sent by the Royal Navy to RAF HQ Malta:  “The Navy are loud in their praise of the assistance given to the convoy by our fighter aircraft often operating under difficult circumstances.  They engaged and destroyed a great number of enemy aircraft and greatly contributed to reducing the scale of attack.”

NEW SPITFIRE DELIVERY

HMS Furious

AIR RAIDS DAWN 17 AUGUST TO DAWN 18 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles

0815-0920 hrs; 0820-0855 hrs; 0925-1003 hrs  Four Spitfires at a time of 229 and 249 Squadrons Ta Qali on patrol: no sightings.

1205-1240 hrs  Air raid alert.  Six Spitfires from Hal Far (two of Green Section) are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy fighters.  P/O Stenborg and Sgt Weaver jumps nine ME 109s.  Sgt Weaver shoots down two enemy aircraft and P/O Stenborg shoots down one, before being shot down himself by a ME 109.  He bales out and is picked up by the High Speed Launch.

Four Spitfires 249 Squadron are despatched to cover the arrival of Spitfires: no enemy action.

1300-1350 hrs; 1345-1430 hrs; 1510-1610 hrs; 1600-1710 hrs  Two Spitfires at a time of 229 and 249 Squadrons on patrol: no sightings.

PM  185 Squadron Hal Far fly 16 sorties over shipping in Grand Harbour.

1757-1810 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled to intercept reported enemy raiders: no sightings.

2000 hrs  Penn, Bramham, and Ledbury sailed for Gibraltar.

2320-2350 hrs  Air raid alert for three enemy aircraft which do not cross the coast; all bombs are dropped in the sea.

Military casualties  Flight Sergeant Eugene Connell, Royal Canadian Air Force, 204 Squadron; Sergeant William Davis Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 204 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Edward Jackman, Royal Air Force, 204 Squadron; Flight Sergeant Walter Maconnell, Royal Canadian Air Force, 204 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 17 AUGUST 1942

HMS Hebe

ROYAL NAVY  Beauforts escorted by Beaufighters attacked an escorted merchant vessel west of Linosa and obtained one torpedo hit. This ship was subsequently sunk by [submarine] P 44, the force of the explosion being so great as to necessitate the submarine returning to Malta for repairs.  [Submarine] P 42 was swept into Marsamxett by Hebe.

AIR HQ  1600 hrs  Six Beauforts 86 Squadron escorted by five Beaufighters 252 and 235 Squadrons, and four long-range Spitfires 126 Squadron, attacked a convoy of two destroyers and one 7000 ton merchant vessel, patrolled by four JU 88s and two enemy fighters, in position 280 degrees Lampedusa, 35 miles.  Two torpedo hits were scored on the merchant vessel which was left stationary, pouring white smoke and down by the stern.  Two Beaufighters dropped four 250lb [semi-armour-piercing] bombs, scoring one direct hit on the stern of the merchant vessel.  Beaufighters and Beauforts also attached the merchant vessel and other merchant craft with machine-gun and cannon fire.  During the attack, one JU 88 and one enemy fighter were probably destroyed.  Photographs confirm that the merchant vessel has been sunk.

Arrivals  One Beaufort, one Hudson from Gibraltar; 29 Spitfires from Naval operation.  Departures  17 Maryland to Abu Sueir; three Baltimores to LG 98; one Spitfire to Kilo 8; one Liberator to Fayid.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington crashed on aerodrome: crew uninjured.  One Spitfire shot down into the sea: pilot rescued uninjured.  One Spitfire hit an obstruction on landing: pilot uninjured.

18 August: Malta’s Squadrons Praised For Attacks

Malta Spitfires refuelled and re-armed

“The Air Officer Commanding sends congratulations to Nos 217, 235, 126 and 1435 Squadrons for their successful attack on enemy convoy on 17 August 1942.  This was a fine example of good team-work between Beauforts, Beaufighters and Spitfires.”  Re-armed and refuelled thanks to the arrival of the recent convoy, Malta’s RAF Squadrons last night resumed their attacks on Axis convoys through the Mediterranean, with considerable success.  With the battle for control of the Middle East again reaching a critical point, Malta can resume its key role as a base for disrupting the supply of Rommel’s forces in North Africa.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 18 AUGUST TO DAWN 19 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

Day  Spitfires from Hal Far made eight patrol sorties over Grand Harbour.

0815-0850 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy aircraft.  Sgt Beurling reports seeing five hostile fighters, not seen by the other pilots: no contact made.

1045-1155 hrs; 1135-1230 hrs; 1215-1315 hrs; 1300-1415 hrs; 1400-1515 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 and 249 Squadrons at a time are airborne on patrol: nothing sighted.

1525-1630 hrs; 1550-1634 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron at a time are scrambled to intercept reported enemy aircraft: no sightings.

1650-1715 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 249 Squadron scrambled to intercept approaching fighters see six ME 109s above them, among some flak: no combat.  F/Lt Woods’ aircraft has a malfunctioning wing flap and lands at Luqa; he is unhurt.

2230-2245 hrs; 0035-0042 hrs  Air raid alerts. One enemy aircraft which comes to within 25 miles of Gozo and drops bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 18 AUGUST 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals Four Beauforts, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Baltimore to LG 98; one Beaufighter to EDCU; four Beauforts to LG 224.

19 August: Gort Flies to Cairo to Meet PM Churchill

Winston Churchill at British Embassy Cairo August 1942 (c) OWM E15347

His Excellency the Governor and Commander in Chief Viscount Gort flew to Cairo today to report in person to the British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, on the state of things in Malta following the arrival of the Operation Pedestal convoy.  To cover the Governor’s absence, Vice Admiral, Malta is appointed as his Deputy.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 19 AUGUST TO DAWN 20 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine: little or no cloud, increasing later; visibility 10-15 miles. Wind light, variable, becoming east south east, moderate.

0955-1030 hrs  Air raid alert for twelve approaching enemy fighters.  Two groups of four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept; two aircraft return early.  The others sight three ME 109s above them: no combat.

1005-1050 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali patrol over a minesweeper: nothing to report.

1100-1205 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on patrol: no sightings.

1150-1305 hrs  Enemy aircraft are reported heading for the Islands.  Two Spitfires are scrambled to intercept  but the raid does not approach.

1749-1907 hrs  Seven Spitfires from Hal Far patrol north of St Paul’s Bay and Gozo: nothing sighted.

2315-2320 hrs  Air raid alert for two enemy aircraft which drop bombs in the sea north of Gozo.

Military casualties  Private William Kelly, 1st Battalion, Hampshire Regiment.

Civilian casualties  Birkirkara  Gaetan Mansueto, age 40.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 19 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Rye swept Una and P 44 into harbour.

AIR HQ Arrivals Two DC3 from Bilbeis; Four Beauforts, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beauforts to Shandur; six Beauforts, one DC3 to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufort engine failed; forced to land: crew uninjured.  One Beaufort shot down into the sea while on shipping strike:crew missing.

20 August: Air Crews are Lucky Survivors

One Beaufighter of 227 Squadron and one Beaufort of 39 Squadron have been reported lost following the latest attack by Malta air forces on an enemy convoy.  They were among a formation of twelve Beauforts and ten Beaufighters 227 Squadron on a mission to bomb a tanker and merchant ship with destroyer escort off Cape Stilo.  The two aircraft were hit by flak as the enemy fired barrages to defend their vessels. 

A Beaufort of 39 Squadron at Luqa

The Beaufighter of pilot Warrant Officer Donald Brixo from New Zealand and navigator Sergeant Douglas Paterson crashed into the sea.  Flying Officer Peter Roper of Canada was also shot down in his Beaufort; he radioed that he and his observer were injured while the remaining crew were unhurt.  Nothing more was heard of them and the crews of both aircraft have been officially reported missing. (2)    

Another Beaufighter was shot down today off Kalafrana Bay, killing the Wireless Operator/Observer, Sergeant George Leslie.  The pilot, Flying Officer Eyre, survived and was rescued by the High Speed Launch.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 20 AUGUST TO DAWN 21 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine: wind south south-east, light to moderate; visibility 10-15 miles.

1005-1020 hrs  Air raid alert.  Nine Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali and nine of 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled to intercept a fighter sweep.  Sgt Beurling sights two Me 109s but does not engage.

1115-1135 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept enemy fighters.  They sight four ME 109s at 24000 feet, ten miles north of Grand Harbour: no engagement.

1520-1535 hrs  Air raid alert.  Eight Spitfires 229 Squadron and eight Spitfires from Hal Far are scrambled to intercept reported enemy aircraft (two of 229 return early): no sightings.

1715-1820 hrs; 1955-2035 hrs  Four and two Spitfires 249 Squadron on intercept patrol: no sightings.

Military casualties  Sergeant George Leslie, 227 Beaufighter Squadron; Private Walter Wade, 8th Battalion, King’s Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster).

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 20 AUGUST 1942

Speedy makes a smokescreen over Grand Harbour (NWMA Malta)

ROYAL NAVY  Smoke was made for one large [enemy] formation approaching, but no attack materialized.  705 of QBB 273 searched by 17th Minesweeping Flotilla.

AIR HQ  Twelve Beauforts 39 Squadron escorted by ten Beaufighters 227 Squadron, six carrying bombs, attacked a convoy comprising five destroyers, one 8000 ton tanker and one small merchant vessel, escorted by one Cant Z501 and six single-engined fighters in position 180 degrees Cape Stilo four miles, course 040 degrees, speed 5-10 knots.  It was estimated that the tanker was fully laden and had a draft of 22-24 feet.  Torpedoes were released with a 22 ft setting but no hits were seen on the tanker.

Explosions were, however, seen some distance from the convoy to port, but these may have been caused by bombs.  It is now believed that the tanker was not fully laden at the time of the attack and had a much smaller draft than originally anticipated.  This may have been why no strikes were made, as torpedoes were seen to run well.

Four Beaufighters dropped seven 250lb [semi-armour-piercing] bombs, scoring one possible hit on the stern of a destroyer.  The tanker and other craft were also raked with machine-gun and cannon fire.  A small pilot vessel was sunk by cannon fire a quarter of a mile ahead of the convoy.  One Macchi 200 and the Cant Z501 were damaged.

Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; two Beauforts to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter crashed into the sea: pilot rescued; Wireless Operator/Observer missing, believed killed.  One Beaufort and one Beaufighter  believed hit by enemy flak while on shipping strike: Beaufighter observed crashing into the sea; both crews missing.  One Beaufort hit by enemy flak while on shipping strike: pilot and A/Observer injured; rest of crew uninjured.

21 August: Oil Tanker Disabled in RAF Attack

RAF bombers have stopped a major delivery of fuel to Rommel’s forces in North Africa.  This was the second attempt by Malta Beauforts and Beaufighters to disrupt the enemy convoy, following an unsuccessful attack yesterday.  This time the attackers scored three torpedo hits and two near-misses with bombs on the 8000 ton oil tanker, which was brought to a halt, with oil pouring from both sides.  They also destroyed at least five enemy aircraft in the attack.  The tanker was later photographed beached in shallow water on the Corfu coast.

TIMES OF MALTA LAUNCHES ‘MALTA CONVOY FUND’

Lighters full of supplies for Malta (c) IWM GM1464

Malta’s leading newspaper today announced the launch of a fund to help the dependants of those killed trying to bring vital supplies to Malta in Operation Pedestal.  Subscriptions are already coming in from those keen to express their gratitude for the sacrifice of convoy crews, airmen and gunners who lost their lives in the dangerous mission to relieve the siege.  The funds raised will be co-ordinated by the Anglo Maltese League.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 21 AUGUST TO DAWN 22 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fair.

1335-1500 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron and four 249 Squadron are scrambled to intercept an enemy fighter sweep.  Two aircraft of 249 Squadron lose the formation and return early.  No enemy aircraft are sighted.  The wheel of F/Lt Lovell’s aircraft (229 Squadron) collapses on landing.

1814-1901 hrs  Four Spitfires from Hal Far patrol over a homecoming strike force: no interceptions.

Military casualties  None named.                                                           Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 21 AUGUST 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Gibraltar reported the safe arrival of Penn, Ledbury and Bramham.

AIR HQ  1800 hrs  The tanker was again attacked by nine Beauforts 39 Squadron, escorted by eight Beaufighters 248 Squadron, and five Beaufighters 229 Squadron carrying bombs.  Position 003 degrees Paxos, 12 miles, course 170 degrees, speed 6 knots.  Three torpedo hits and two near-misses with bombs were scored on the tanker and a direct hit by a bomb was made on a destroyer.  All aircraft also attacked the tanker with machine-gun and cannon fire.  The Beaufighter escort shot down two P32s, one JU 52, two BR 20s and probably destroyed a JU 88.  Photographs taken after the attack show the tanker to be stationary and oil flowing from both sides of it.  Later photos show it to be beached in three fathoms of water in Saiada Bay, Corfu.

Departures  Three Beauforts to LG 224; one Beaufort to Shandur.  Transit aircraft missing  One Beaufort en route from Malta to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter forced down into the sea by enemy action: crew missing.  One Beaufort had engine trouble and crashed into the sea: Wireless Operator/Air Gunner slightly injured; rest of crew uninjured.  One Beaufighter’s tyre burst: crew uninjured.  One Beaufort believed hit by enemy flak, force landed in the sea: crew missing.  One Beaufort hit by enemy flak while on shipping strike: Wireless Operator/Air Gunner injured; rest of crew uninjured.  One Baltimore;s engine cut on landing: Wireless Operator/Air Gunner and A/Observer injured.  One Beaufighter damaged by enemy flak crash-landed: crew injured.

22 August: Convoy 32000 Tons of Supplies but No Ration Increase

From: Governor & C in C Malta                To:  C in C Middle East              Rpt: The War Office

Military situation report for week ending [22 Aug] 1942

Convoy brought limited supplies (c) IWM GM1429

1.  Unloading convoy almost complete.  32000 tons unloaded, dispersed to and cleared from dumps mainly by army in 8 days.  This will provide approx. 3 months additional food at present reduced ration scale.  Slight increase in civilian bread ration may be possible; Army bread ration already increased one ounce to compensate shortage potatoes.  Certain variety items received will make Army rations less monotonous but no major alteration practicable.  Further economy in [motor transport] spirit necessary however.

2.  No attempt by enemy to attack convoy in harbour.  Activity confined to small fighter sweeps.  No bombers crossed coast day or night; almost constitutes a record.  3 ME 109s destroyed for loss of one Spitfire.

3.  29 torpedo-carrying Beaufort sorties escorted by bomb-carrying Beaufighters attacked enemy convoys to Libya.  One merchant vessel 7000 tons damaged – subsequently sunk by submarine P44.  One tanker hit and stopped.  Hits or near misses on two destroyers.  One Ju 52 and six other aircraft certainly destroyed and five damaged over convoys.  Three Beauforts, three Beaufighters missing.

4.  Winter accommodation in the form of a simple section hut being built by troops as civil labour used on aerodromes.  1400 Army still working on aerodromes.

5.  Military damage and casualties nil.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 22 AUGUST TO DAWN 23 AUGUST 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

1715-1810 hrs  Ten Spitfires 185 Squadron Hal Far are scrambled to intercept approaching enemy aircraft: no engagement.  One Hurricane force-landed with undercarriage trouble: Pilot S/Lt Elliot unhurt.

Military casualties  Flying Officer Norman Adams, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (VR); Sergeant George Form, Royal Air Force VR, 202 Squadron; Sergeant Cecil Lee, Royal Air Force, 202 Squadron; Sergeant Alan Morgan, Royal Air Force VR, 202 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 22 AUGUST 1942

AIR HQ  Arrivals One DC3 from LG 224; two Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Hurricane in accident on aerodrome: pilot uninjured.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 19.  Dealt with: 3 High Explosives, all 250kg, plus 42 anti-personnel bombs.

(1)  ‘WW2 People’s War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The archive can be found at bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar’

(2)  Warrant Officer Donald Brisco and Sergeant Douglas Paterson 227 Squadron and Flying Officer Peter Roper, 39 Squadron, and his crew survived and were taken Prisoners-of-War.

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

 
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Posted by on August 22, 2017 in 1942, August 1942, Uncategorized

 

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