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6-12 September 1942: Malta Prays as Children Cry for Bread

12 Sep

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DON’T MISS NEXT WEEK – 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF GEORGE CROSS PRESENTATION TO MALTA ON 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

 

“We were very close to starvation…I remember one particularly moving scene when a five year old boy with tears streaming down his face kept asking his mother for a slice of bread and the mother, weeping, saying, I haven’t got any, my son’… none of us there had any food to give him.”  Carmen Sapiano (1)

6 September 1942: Malta Unites to Pray for Deliverance

Barracca Chapel, Valletta

The population of Malta, military and civilian alike, attended churches across the Island today to mark a National Day of Prayer.  At 10 o’clock this morning the Army’s General Officer Commanding joined troops at the Barracca Church for a special service, followed by a parade outside the church and march back to barracks.  This evening the GOC inspected the Home Guard at Qormi, Birkirkara, Sliema and St Julian’s.

ATTACK ON AXIS CONVOY COSTS THIRTEEN AIRMEN

This morning two 7000 ton merchant vessels from Taranto were seen to join up with 4800 ton SS Ankara and another 7-8000 tons merchantman from Brindisi.  The convoy then proceeded south eastwards towards the Greek coast, escorted by eleven destroyers and patrolled by six Macchi fighters and six JU 88s.

Receiving details of the convoy, Air HQ Malta ordered nine Beauforts of 39 Squadron into the air, with eleven Beaufighters of 89 and 227 Squadrons.  At 1330 hrs this afternoon, the attacking force caught up with the convoy 30 miles south of Cape Santa Maria di Leuca and attacked.  Five of the Beaufighters drew the fire of the enemy air escort, destroying one JU 88, probably destroying a Macchi 200 and damaging one JU 88, one Macchi 200 and a flying boat.

Meanwhile the remaining six Beaufighters swooped in to divert defensive flak from the convoy, raking the destroyers and merchant ships with machine-gun and cannon fire, and dropping twelve 250 lb bombs, scoring several near-misses.  Cleared to reach their target, the Beauforts released eight torpedoes, scoring at least one hit and another possible on a merchant vessel, which began to belch smoke.  The Beauforts also destroyed one Macchi 200 and damaged two others as well as one JU 88.

Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or anti-aircraft flak during the raid.  One Beauforts and three Beaufighters failed to return from the raid: thirteen Air Force personnel have been reported missing, presumed killed.  The crew of the Beaufort piloted by Flight Sergeant Watlington had a lucky escape when their aircraft was hit and damaged by enemy fighters.  Wireless Operator, Sergeant Hugh McIllaney and Air Gunner, Sergeant Leslie Tester, were both wounded by shrapnel.  The Navigator Sergeant Charles Grant, rushed help, administering first aid to stop the bleeding.  Sgt Grant then took over the Vickers gun to ward off further enemy attackers.  Despite damage to The Beaufort’s hydraulics, flaps, tail assembly and turret, Flt Sgt Watlington managed to fly it back to Luqa and make a safe landing.

Later reconnaissance missions report that only three merchant ships and ten destroyers remained in the convoy: one merchantman was reported beached near Corfu.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 6 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility good.

1405-1414 hrs  Air raid alert.  Two enemy aircraft come to within 20 miles of the coast and then recede.

1720-1830 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are airborne to cover a returning fighter sweep: no sightings.

1910-1935 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron search for missing aircraft.

Maqluba Church

2038 hrs  HQ Coy, 3rd Bn Kings Own Malta Regiment report a ‘golden rain’ rocket over west Zurrieq, moving towards Maqluba Church.  C Company patrol but report seeing nothing.  Rocket believed to have been used by villagers.

Military casualties  Sergeant Arthur Calvert, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR); Flight Sergeant James Cunningham, RAF VR, Wireless Operator/Air Gunner; Sergeant Edward Cox, RAF VR; Sergeant Kevin Duncan, RAF VR; Lieutenant R Clifford Evans, South African Air Force, pilot; Flight Sergeant Roy Gibbons, RAF VR; Flight Lieutenant Donald Sharman, RAF, pilot; Sergeant Michael Wadham, RAF VR; Pilot Officer Robert Watson, RAF VR, all 39 [Beaufort] Squadron.

Sergeant Albert Cusworth, RAF VR, Navigator; Lieutenant Frederick Noome, South African Air Force, pilot; Flying Officer Dennis Partridge, Royal Australian Air Force, pilot; Sergeant Anthony Vivian, RAF VR, navigator; all 227 [Beaufighter] Squadron.

Gunner Carmel Buttigieg, 3 LAA Regiment, Royal Malta Artillery.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SUNDAY 6 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P44 to sea and then anchored at Marsaxlokk.  An enemy merchant vessel was attacked when in convoy off Cape Ducato, by Beaufighters and Beauforts, and was hit and probably sunk.

AIR HQ  Night  Four Wellingtons were despatched to attack enemy shipping: no sightings.  Arrivals  One DC3 from LG 224; five Wellingtons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one DC3, two Wellingtons to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Wellington ran off the runway during take-off and crashed into a Beaufighter: crew uninjured. One Beaufort crashed on landing with hydraulic and turret trouble: crew uninjured.  Six Beauforts and two Beaufighters were damaged by enemy fighters or flak while on shipping strike: one Beaufighter was seen crashing into the sea, two others and one Beaufort failed to return to base: all four crews are missing.  One Beaufort’s Wireless Operator/Air Gunner was killed but the rest of its crew returned uninjured.  Two Wireless Operators/Air Gunners were injured on board another Beaufort; the rest of the crew were unhurt and all returned to base.  The crews of the remaining two Beauforts escaped injury and returned to base.

LUQA  0730 hrs  Holy Communion in Poor House Cinema.  2030 hrs  Community hymn singing.

TA QALI  0700-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron were despatched on offensive reconnaissance.  S/Ldr Woods attacked one of two 25 ton grey motor-driven two-masted craft, obtaining strikes on the hull and cabin with a four-second burst of cannon and machine-guns.  The other Spitfires did not fire, in some doubt as to the identity of the craft.  1110-1220 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no sightings.

7 September 1942: Wellingtons Attack Surviving Axis Ships

RAF armourers prepare 500lb bombs for convoy attacks

The surviving vessels of the Axis convoy attacked by Malta air forces yesterday were today reported continuing on their course south eastwards.  Today three Wellingtons of 69 Squadron were sent to carry out a further attack.  Fifty miles north of Cape Aamer the Wellingtons came upon two merchant vessels with three destroyers as escort.  The bombers released twelve 500lb bombs which they reported landing within 10 yards of the larger merchant ship.  No damage report has yet been received.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 7 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0645-0745 hrs  Two Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali search for a missing Beaufort crew: no sightings.

1210-1256 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and orbit the Island at 12000 feet: nothing seen.

0103-0118 hrs  Air raid alert: one enemy aircraft drops bombs in the sea five miles north east of Grand Harbour.  A Malta night fighter is airborne and chases the unidentified raider but is unable to intercept.

Military casualties  Flight Lieutenant Wallis Brown, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS MONDAY 7 SEPTEMBER 1942

P46 HMS Unruffled returns to Malta after patrol

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy swept P46 and Utmost in from sea.  While towing targets in St Paul’s Bay area, WD vessel Clive swept two mines with her towing wire.

AIR HQ 1928-2300 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, four Hudsons from Gibraltar.  Departures  Two Beauforts, three Wellingtons to LG 224.

HAL FAR  0748-0850 hrs  Seven Spitfires (one spare) flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing sighted.

LUQA  Camp cinema: Tarzan Finds a Son.

TA QALI   1130-1240 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two returned early): no enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  B Coy fired light machine guns on Pembroke Range.  Other Coys on intensified training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Brigade ordered special vigilance for mine-watching posts.

Tuesday 8 September 1942: Maltese Go Hungry As Rations Prove Inedible

Thousands who were served at Victory Kitchens today with a new rationed version of Balbuljata (2), using powdered eggs with minced vegetables, threw the food away in protest.  This is the second time a dish has been rejected as unpalatable: a week ago liver stew was found to be too bitter to stomach.

As well as claiming the Balbuljata was inedible, people expressed fury at the small portion on offer: no more than two tablespoonfuls, with another two of peas.  The Government decided that due to shortages the dish must remain on the Victory Kitchen menu but subscribers will be allowed to opt out of the meal by paying for six meals instead of seven weekly.  So far, very few have taken up the offer as they have no alternative way to feed themselves.  (3)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 8 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch

1008-1032 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four ME 109s cross the Island at great height.  Heavy Ack Ack fire pointer rounds.  Malta fighters are scrambled to intercept: one Spitfire is shot down into the sea off Bubaqra Battery.  The pilot bales out and is later picked up uninjured by the Rescue Launch.

1050-1125 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1550-1700 hrs  Ten Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled to intercept three unidentified enemy aircraft: no engagement.

1855-1920 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0001-0010 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within 15 miles of the Island.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                                         Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS TUESDAY 8 SEPTEMBER 1942

AIR HQ   2240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Departures  Three Hudsons to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire was shot up by enemy fighters: pilot baled out, landed in the sea and was rescued uninjured.

HAL FAR  1127-1251 hrs  Ten Spitfires (two spare, which returned early) flew over Lampedusa: nothing seen.  1824-1932 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily as far as Comiso on Rodeo: no enemy aircraft seen.

LUQA  Camp cinema:  Rhythm on the River

TA QALI  0750-0845 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (two return early): no enemy aircraft sighted.  1500-1600 hrs  Ten Spitfires 229 Squadron and twelve of 249 Squadron on Rodeo (four of 229 return early).  Four enemy aircraft were sighted but no interception possible.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy commenced firing on Pembroke Range.  B Coy commenced changeover of billets Polverista to Dockyard.  C Coy normal training.

1st Bn DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT  Lighter down in the sea 214 degrees Ta Silch Observation Post, two miles out.

9 September 1942: Black Marketeers Face Jail

32 days prison for stealing a tin of corned beef

…we could no longer get enough bread to satisfy our hunger on the grounds that supplies of flour are just about enough to meet the needs of the registered families.  At that stage my family began to really feel the hunger brought on by the shortages…Protection Officers, with their staff, had the job of organizing the distribution and control of food to the families in their district. Each family was issued with a Ration Card. On it was written the number of men, women and children and the total weight of bread the family is allowed per day. Besides the allowance of bread, on the card was written the quantities of other foodstuff allowed per fortnight… At the back of the card there used be a number of squares printed with a number in each square [to] represent the day of the month.

Black market was rampant in towns and villages. The suppliers were normally the farmers who insisted on gold rather than paper money for payment…In view of the very grievous situation Malta was in at the time, the authorities took an extremely serious view of any stealing of goods which was costing so many lives and ships to bring in to the starving population and the garrison. Just one typical example: caught stealing one tin of corned beef off an unloading operation in the ports was punishable with thirty two days imprisonment.”  J A Zahra, 2011

AIR RAIDS DAWN 9 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-0935 hrs; 1010-1040 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron at a time scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1330-1342 hrs  Air raid alert.  15 enemy fighters approach but none cross the coast.

1313-1409 hrs  Ten Spitfires are scrambled from Hal Far and patrol over St Paul’s Bay and the Island: nothing seen.

2236-2308 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy aircraft approach to within five miles of Dingli, dropping bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                              Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS WEDNESDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Speedy, Hebe, Rye and 4 motor launches carried out a clearance sweep from position 210 miles to the northward. No mines were swept. The sweepers were reported as a convoy by German fighters.  The two mines cut by Clive‘s towing wire the previous day were sunk by gunfire.

De Havilland Flamingo

AIR HQ   Twelve Spitfire sorties on offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  One Macchi 202 and one ME 109 destroyed for the loss of one Spitfire.  2250 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Wellington, one Flamingo, one Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.  Aircraft casualties  One Spitfire failed to return from a fighter sweep over enemy territory; believed force-landed: pilot missing.

HAL FAR  0930-1045 hrs  Seven Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo and attacked 3-4 enemy aircraft over Biscara.  Captain Kuhlmann shot down a Macchi 202.  Sgt Weaver, DFM crash-landed in Sicily and was taken prisoner.  1730-1840 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over Sicily on Rodeo: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert: Fly Gang in a new show.

TA QALI  0650-0745 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance: no enemy sighted.  1400-1500 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on offensive reconnaissance (one spare returned early).  A few bursts of light flak 45 miles north east of Gela.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  B Coy continued move and D Coy moved from St Clements to Polverista.  Remainder on training.

10 September 1942: Victory Kitchens Need Urgent Review, Says Strickland

Colonel R Strickland today moved a motion in the Council of Government to appoint a Select Committee to report on the running of the Victory Kitchens and make recommendations for improvements.  The food distribution system is now struggling under the sheer weight of demand: since 1st August, the number of subscribers has trebled to 60,000.  Many have felt forced to join since the Communal Feeding Department is now commandeering all available produce, leaving those outside the scheme unable to obtain meat or vegetables.  Introducing his proposal, Col Strickland highlighted the people’s complaints:

“Extreme dissatisfaction prevails regarding the running of the Victory Kitchens, and the lot of the housewife has become well nigh impossible…The personnel employed in the Victory Kitchens is not suitable…[lacking] adequate knowledge of local customs and of Maltese habits and tastes…The Department is buying supplies at prices above the established controlled price…Cooks maintain that too much food is given to them, they do not cook it, by next morning it disappears…The cooking is bad…Another serious thing [is the] unequal portions being meted out…” (2)

AIR RAIDS DAWN 10 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather   Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0735-0815 hrs  Four Spitfires 249 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

0835-0930 hrs  Four  Spitfires 249 Squadron are airborne to cover 1435 Squadron returning from a fighter sweep.

1003-1111 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far area scrambled on intercept patrol: nothing seen.

2000 hrs  Observers report three shipping plots three miles north east of the island.

2020 hrs  C and D Coys, 1st Bn Dorsetshire Regt report small craft in DELs, 30 degrees RA3. 

2030 hrs  Dorsetshire Regt report more craft in DELs: guns fire.

0005-0036 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach to within 10-15 miles of Gozo and drop bombs in the sea.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Sergeant Roland Ainsworth, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAF VR);  Sergeant Thomas Kirkham, RAF VR; Sergeant William Law, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant James Pilling, RAF VR; Pilot Officer John Pope, RAF VR; Flight Sergeant Ruskin Rice, Royal Canadian Air Force; Sergeant Joseph Sloan, RAF VR; all 202 Squadron.

Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS THURSDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  2130 hrs  Three MTBs were reported from the plot one mile from the coast between Madliena and St. Paul’s Bay. Nothing was sighted.

AIR HQ  0010-0240 hrs  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily: no enemy aircraft seen.  Arrivals  One Beaufort from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar.

HAL FAR  0636-0756 hrs  Five Spitfires flew over south east Sicily on Rodeo: nothing seen.

LUQA  Luqa beat the Merchant Navy in a cricket match at Marsa:  Luqa 107 for 6 declared; Merchant Navy 104.  Camp cinema:  Lady of the Tropics.

TA QALI  1000-1105 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on offensive reconnaissance.  Enemy aircraft were reported but none sighted.

1st Bn CHESHIRE REGIMENT  A Coy fired rifles on Pembroke Range.  One Officer and one NCO attended bomb recce course under Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal.  B, C and D Coys held weekly night exercise.

11 September 1942: Malta Commanders Gather in Secret

Bomb damage in Palace Square, Valletta

Malta dignitaries, military and civil defence personnel gathered in Valletta today in conditions of the utmost secrecy to rehearse for the formal presentation of the George Cross to the Island which takes place on Sunday next.  With the recent reduction in air attacks and the evident superiority of the RAF in the skies over Malta, the Governor and Commander in Chief has decided it is now safe for the important ceremony to take place.  However, for security reasons it has been decided not to announce details of Sunday’s event beyond Malta’s shores.

The George Cross will be officially handed over by Lord Gort to Sir George Borg, Chief Justice of Malta at 9.15 am in Palace Square, which has been cleared of debris for the occasion.  The Royal Malta Artillery have been chosen to provide the guard of honour and the band of the King’s Own Malta Regiment will play for the ceremony.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 11 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

1024-1038 hrs  Air raid alert.  One enemy fighter approaches the Island at 6000 feet to within eight miles of Grand Harbour, then recedes.

1200-1250 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on patrol: no enemy aircraft sighted.

2330-0042 hrs  Air raid alert.  Three enemy bombers approach the Island.  One comes within five miles north of St Paul’s Bay and another 15 miles west of Dingli: both drop bombs in the sea.  The third crosses the coast and drops bombs on the northern end of Ta Qali.  Heavy Ack Ack engage.  Malta night fighters are airborne: no engagement.

Military casualties  Nil.                                                                          Civilian casualties  Nil.

OPERATIONS REPORTS FRIDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  P35 was swept out by Hebe and proceeded on patrol.

AIR HQ  Two Wellingtons were despatched to locate and destroy a submarine in the Benghazi area: no sighting.  Arrivals  One Hudson, two Wellingtons from Gibraltar; one DC3 from Shallufa.  Departures  One Flamingo, one DC3 to LG 224; one Hudson to Gibraltar.

LUQA  Camp cinema: At the Circus.

TA QALI  0725-0820 hrs  Five Spitfires 249 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1125-1300 hrs  Five Spitfires 229 Squadron (one spare returned early) on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast: no enemy aircraft sighted.  1830-1940 hrs  Two Spitfires 249 Squadron on shipping patrol: no sightings.

10th Bn KING’S OWN MALTA REGIMENT  Dress rehearsal for presentation of George Cross to Malta.

12 September 1942: Malta Air Forces 40 Attacks in 7 Days

MILITARY SITUATION REPORT WEEK ENDING 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

From:  Governor & C in C Malta               To:  C in C Middle East              Rptd:  The War Office

Ta Qali

 

1.  Enemy air activity slight.  22 fighter sorties by day, 18 bomber sorties by night.  One bomber crossed the coast: bombs on Ta Qali.

2.  Beauforts and Beaufighters attacked a convoy of four merchant vessels and eleven destroyers.  One merchant vessel hit, one probably hit.  Two enemy aircraft escorting destroyed, one probable, six damaged.

3.  Military damage and casualties [in Malta] nil.  Training continues.

AIR RAIDS DAWN 12 SEPTEMBER TO DAWN 13 SEPTEMBER 1942

Weather  Fine; visibility 10-15 miles.

0925-1025 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron Ta Qali are scrambled on intercept patrol: no sightings.

1122-1226 hrs  Five Spitfires Hal Far are scrambled and patrol the Island between Comino and Zonqor at 14000 feet: nothing seen.

1216-1308 hrs  Four Spitfires Hal Far are airborne as cover for returning Spitfires, patrolling ato 14000 feet, 30-40 miles north of Grand Harbour: nothing seen.

2143-2203 hrs  Air raid alert.  Four enemy aircraft approach the Island at 23-26000 feet but drop all bombs in the sea.

Military casualties  Nil.

Civilian casualties  Qrendi  Grezzju Dalli, age 52.

OPERATIONS REPORTS SATURDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 1942

ROYAL NAVY  Hythe carried out search of QBB 273.

AIR HQ  Twelve Spitfires carried out an offensive reconnaissance over Sicily.  Four Beaufighters were despatched on shipping strike: no sightings.  Night  One Beaufighter on intruder patrol over Sicily.  Arrivals  One Hudson from Gibraltar.  Departures  One Hudson to Gibraltar; one Wellington to LG 224.  Aircraft casualties  One Beaufighter swung off the runway during take-off: crew uninjured.

HAL FAR  1530-1626 hrs  Four Spitfires were despatched on Rodeo to south east Sicily: nil report.

LUQA  Camp cinema concert.

TA QALI  1135-1235 hrs  Four Spitfires 229 Squadron on reconnaissance patrol over Sicilian coast encountered heavy Ack Ack at 16000 feet, accurate at height being only 250-500 yards behind Spitfires.  No enemy aircraft sighted.

FORTRESS ROYAL ENGINEERS  Bomb Disposal UXB  Reported 18.  Dealt with: 10 High Explosives inc 2 delayed action (1 x 1000kg; 1 x 500kg; 4 x 250kg; 3 x 50kg; 1 x 12kg AP); 18 anti-personnel bombs.

(1) The People’s War, Malta 1940/43, Laurence Mizzi, Progress Press, Malta 1998

(2)  Normally made with scrambled eggs, tomatoes and onion

(3)  Adapted from When Malta Stood Alone (1940-1943), Joseph Micallef, Interprint Malta, 1981

 

All written content © maltagc70 unless otherwise attributed.  For conditions of use contact bdmalta@btinternet.com

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1 Comment

Posted by on September 12, 2017 in 1942, August 1942, Uncategorized

 

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One response to “6-12 September 1942: Malta Prays as Children Cry for Bread

  1. morawel@mymts.net

    September 12, 2017 at 6:28 pm

    Makes You think, listening to the fireworks tonight – our world is so different now, thanks to them all! >

     

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